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Old September 22nd, 2010, 08:22 PM
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Paul Motter Paul Motter is offline
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Henry - I am very sorry but I hope you realize that there is absolutely nothing personal in any of this at all.

I sympathize with you and I can even stop posting here, but I think this is bigger than you or me.

The guy who left these jokes (where I found them) said the people who capsized in Antarctica a few years ago used them to keep their spirits up while they waited to be rescued. I have been in that kind of environment and I am sure they are scared as h***

So, I don't joke about the holocaust because there is nothing funny about it. But what you are saying is that humor is inherently bad. I disagree.

If you read the most famous Holocaust book there is, "Night" by Elie Wiesel you would see he learned to survive by learning to accept his situation - not by protesting or living in anger, but by accepting even his father's death for what it was and letting go. I think humor is a tool to do that. He said "The opposite of love is not hate, it is indifference.

Titanic happened in 1912, before they even had the technology they have today. I am not making fun of the people who died. I am joking about the irony of the situation where a company thought they had "the ultimate" and it totally failed.

I watch TV night after night where "murder" is merely considered a theme to hang a plot around. Every comedian says there is a fine line between comedy and tragedy. They say "I killed out there, they were dyin', I was killin' 'em." In fact, among comedians it is like an inside sport to use comedy for "taboo subjects" they generally dont use in public. There are holocaust jokes out there, and they are not funny, but a writer on the Daily Show brags she got the job by dropping a Holocaust joke with Jon Stewart when they first met.

My point is that in our society it is perfectly acceptable to use death as a tangential concept not truly related to the real act of dying.

How many shows on TV or movie would disappear of you outlawed death as an acceptable topic of conversation?

Are the Three Stooges are not funny because people can really get hurt hitting other people with hammers and saws? Or is there a distinction between being serious and finding humor in the any given situation.

But the holocaust was an act of genocide, extremely racist and cruel. The Titanic did not have the same element of hate and cruelty. It was just fate. We all die.

I truly hope that the day I die I am able to smile about it.
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