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Old February 10th, 2011, 12:32 PM
ToddDH ToddDH is offline
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Greeneville, Tennessee
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Hawkeye, you are very perceptive.

HOWEVER, if indeed the situation occurred as the cruiser presented it, the actions of Thompson Cruises are absolutely abominable.

Epilepsy is certainly not uncommon. While not all that common, gran mal seizures which it appears this man suffered, are not that often seen by the public, that type of seizure is not all that rare. It is incomprehensible to me that a ship wouldn't have sufficient supplies of the two drugs (at least years ago these were the drugs that were used for decades...I'm sure they've since been upgraded but in an emergency they both still work) of Phenobarbitol and Dilantin (Mike can correct me or at least update me if their use was completely abandoned a long time ago). The following are the procedures I was taught many years ago and may have changed, again, Mike is better versed (or any medical person) on this subject so I hope he/they will correct any major changes in what I'm about to write.

If indeed a person has a Gran Mal seizure (as opposed to a petite mal in which the person basically sits or lies and stares; this type of seizure can actually go unnoticed by passersby who are not familiar with epilepsy) it's best to do the following: Do not put anything in their mouths such as a tongue depressor allegedly used to prevent someone from "swallowing their tongue, which in fact is not possible) but to move any endangering objects such as furniture and/or articles that could injure the victim if he/she hit them or could fall on them. In no way shape or form should a person suffering a gran mal seizure be restrained merely to "calm" them simply because they can be significantly injured. When the seizure ends (it's usually albeit not always, very brief) the victim should then be carried to a bed as they will be absolutely exhausted and sleep (sometimes for several hours) following the event.

Todd
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