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Old September 30th, 2013, 02:40 PM
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Paul Motter Paul Motter is offline
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THAT IS JUST ABOUT AS GOOD A SUMMATION OF THE INEVITABILITY OF ALWAYS TRYING TO GET BIGGER AND BIGGER AS A BUSINESS AS I HAVE READ.

On Wall street that is called commoditization - when a product becomes commodity it means it has become all about volume and less about quality. You make your money by selling more units, usually developed in some kind of assembly plant where everything is reduced to its simplest produced and most easily managed and maintained form.

I agree that the cruise lines participated in making this happened, but it also has a lot to do with the price of fuel AND new ecological standards that have been put upon the cruise lines when sailing anywhere near US waters. Soon they will not be allowed to burn their traditional fuel and will have to go to more expensive fuels for more of each trip. This leads to shorter itineraries where the destinations are secondary to the ports of call.

It was inevitable.

But I am actually more interested in exactly what has happened lately. I agree it is "money" but I think it boils down to Carnival having to cut rates so much just to get people on board - and pricing then affects every cruise line. When stock prices go down so do executive bonuses.

However, a lot of the people I named were not board members, they were just below that - more like top management. Maybe they are just tired of the bean counters dictating everything - making it so mechanical and less innovative.

Also - we are at something of a stagnation point, especially at Carnival corp. where there are very few new and innovative ships coming out. Kind of like the music business in 1969 - sometimes I get the feeling the cruise industry peaked in 2008.
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