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Old May 23rd, 2006, 10:33 AM
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Default How Rough are the Seas?

For the cruising experts out there that have done Alaska, how rough do the seas get & at what point or where?

Only been on a cruise once, so we never had bad seas (April in the Caribbean). When folks mention "ship was really rocking", what does that exactly mean? Is it front to back or side to side? Someone said 18-20 foot waves can be common in bad weather????

Are you being tossed into walls as you are walking? Walking around like a drunken sailor & just stumble a bit? I know the ships are huge with stablizers & such, I'm just trying to understand something I've never experienced.

I hear "ship really rocking" & think of the TV show (on tonight BTW) "Deadliest Catch" with the Alaskan king crab fisherman & see their 100 foot ships getting tossed around by 20 foot waves.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 12:22 PM
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Is your cruise the Inside Passage or to/from Anchorage and Vancouver? The Inside Passage is generally more calm than the open water which can get pretty rough. The last Carribean cruise that I took, we had 12 foot seas so it can happen wherever you may go. You do have to steady yourself in that high of a sea. If rough water is a concern, I would recommend a cabin on the lower midship where it would be less noticeable.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 12:30 PM
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Cassandra,

For the cruising experts out there that have done Alaska, how rough do the seas get & at what point or where?

The ships on Alaska cruises do not go out into really open waters. The "inside passage" is just that -- a series of channels between islands or between and islamd and the mainland, far from open waters. Even the Gulf of Alaska is sheltered on three sides, so it's usually pretty smooth.

That said, all modern cruise ships have hydraulic stabilizers that really do work. A few years agio, I was aboard (the original) MV Royal Princess in a gale in the North Sea and there was no discernable motion whatsoever. Realistically, you might feel some gentle motion aboard a cruise ship in open waters if there are significant swells but nothing that would cause discomfort.

When folks mention "ship was really rocking", what does that exactly mean?

If said in reference to a cruise ship, it probably means that the person who made that comment has never been on a ship in rough waters because cruise ships simply don't go there.

Is it front to back or side to side?

In rough seas, usually both.

The nuclear missile cruiser USS California (CGN-36) had the unusual property that her roll and pitch periods were the same. The result was rocking about some arbitrary axis not aligned either fore and aft or side to side. The weird axis of motion was a bit disconcerting at first, but one quickly adjusted. She also did not have stabilizers, so she took 35 degree rolls in twenty foot seas. On msot ships, though, the periods differ so the rolling and pitching components are not synchronized and each helps to dampen the other.

Someone said 18-20 foot waves can be common in bad weather????

Well, in a bad storm in realatively open waters. Normal waves are the result of friction between water and air, so they grow larger with higher wind speed and longer longer distance of interaction. They also propagate in the direction over which the wind has acted to form them. They tend to spiral outward from a storm system and diminish as they get further from it.

But, again, cruise ships do everyting possible to avoid major storms at sea. They will revice their itineraries completely if necessary. A couple years ago, some cruises operating out of New York that were scheduled to go to Bermuda actually went to Canada's maritime provinces instead because a hurricane was heading in Bermuda's direction.

Are you being tossed into walls as you are walking?

You very quicly learn to stand with your feet slightly apart and knees flexed (not locked) to absorb the motion of the deck under you. It's not as bad as standing on a subway car, even when taking 35 degree rolls on a Navy cruiser.

Walking around like a drunken sailor & just stumble a bit?

No, that happens when you go ashore the ship in a port of call and your legs are still adjusting in the same way even thought you are standing on terra firma rather than a rolling deck.

know the ships are huge with stablizers & such, I'm just trying to understand something I've never experienced.

The only way to understand it is to experience it, but that won't happen on a cruise ship.

Borm.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 01:38 PM
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Default How rough are the seas?

We just returned from the Diampnd Princess. WE did the tour of the Glaciers. The water was not rough at all. The cruise director advised if you were prone to sea sickness to take Bonine when we finished the cruising of the Glaciers. I believe the most rough the wave were was 3 ft.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 01:54 PM
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good information to know! We haven't planned our trip yet as we want to do it for our Honeymoon, so we're looking at this point. Probably within 2 years is my guess.

There was a few reviews done on Princess/RCCL & some mentioned some heavy seas. But hey, if its more bumpy than a subway car, guess we'll be fine! I don't think anything on this planet is more bumpy than NYC subways! 8)
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 07:12 PM
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We had some rough seas when sailing between Juneau and Hubbard Glacier and then heading back to Sitka. You leave the inside passage when visiting Hubbard.

Many crew and pax were ill. The crew were drinking ginger ale which is said to help. I've been seasick on smaller vessels in the past but I luckily had no problems in spite of having no sea sick medicine. This being the case, the rocking and rolling was actully fun for me.

We rocked pretty good but no banging into walls but a lot of staggering.

If you choose a cruise round trip inside passage to/from Vancouver and visit Glacier Bay and/or Sawyer glaciers you will stay in the inside passage and there will be less chance of rocking. You are on the ocean however so it could happen.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
Cassandra,

For the cruising experts out there that have done Alaska, how rough do the seas get & at what point or where?

The ships on Alaska cruises do not go out into really open waters. The "inside passage" is just that -- a series of channels between islands or between and islamd and the mainland, far from open waters. Even the Gulf of Alaska is sheltered on three sides, so it's usually pretty smooth.

That said, all modern cruise ships have hydraulic stabilizers that really do work. A few years agio, I was aboard (the original) MV Royal Princess in a gale in the North Sea and there was no discernable motion whatsoever. Realistically, you might feel some gentle motion aboard a cruise ship in open waters if there are significant swells but nothing that would cause discomfort.

When folks mention "ship was really rocking", what does that exactly mean?

If said in reference to a cruise ship, it probably means that the person who made that comment has never been on a ship in rough waters because cruise ships simply don't go there.

Is it front to back or side to side?

In rough seas, usually both.

The nuclear missile cruiser USS California (CGN-36) had the unusual property that her roll and pitch periods were the same. The result was rocking about some arbitrary axis not aligned either fore and aft or side to side. The weird axis of motion was a bit disconcerting at first, but one quickly adjusted. She also did not have stabilizers, so she took 35 degree rolls in twenty foot seas. On msot ships, though, the periods differ so the rolling and pitching components are not synchronized and each helps to dampen the other.

Someone said 18-20 foot waves can be common in bad weather????

Well, in a bad storm in realatively open waters. Normal waves are the result of friction between water and air, so they grow larger with higher wind speed and longer longer distance of interaction. They also propagate in the direction over which the wind has acted to form them. They tend to spiral outward from a storm system and diminish as they get further from it.

But, again, cruise ships do everyting possible to avoid major storms at sea. They will revice their itineraries completely if necessary. A couple years ago, some cruises operating out of New York that were scheduled to go to Bermuda actually went to Canada's maritime provinces instead because a hurricane was heading in Bermuda's direction.

Are you being tossed into walls as you are walking?

You very quicly learn to stand with your feet slightly apart and knees flexed (not locked) to absorb the motion of the deck under you. It's not as bad as standing on a subway car, even when taking 35 degree rolls on a Navy cruiser.

Walking around like a drunken sailor & just stumble a bit?

No, that happens when you go ashore the ship in a port of call and your legs are still adjusting in the same way even thought you are standing on terra firma rather than a rolling deck.

know the ships are huge with stablizers & such, I'm just trying to understand something I've never experienced.

The only way to understand it is to experience it, but that won't happen on a cruise ship.

Borm.
There is misinformation in this post. Alaska cruises can indeed encounter very rough sailing. And they most certainly DO sail open ocean. Very few ships actually sail mostly inside passage anymore. It is far more common for the ships to come out, make up a lot of time then go back in. It's been years since "inside passage" sailings did all coastal sailing. I've been on those sailings, and none are like that anymore.

I also have encountered very rough sailing- almost knocked out of bed on one. My trip 3 weeks ago had 2 days of very rough pitching and rolling. Plates knocked down in the dining room.

One way trips sailing across the Gulf, have a potential for some movement.


So bottom line- no way to predict, 1/4 of my Alaska trips had at least one day of rough sailing, interesting- all were round trip Vancouver.

Round trip Seattle are noted for being the "roughest" since they do a great deal of open ocean.

Be prepared if prone to motion sickness. Enjoy the sailing, I like knowing I'm on a boat.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 07:38 PM
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Karen,

Alaska cruises can indeed encounter very rough sailing.

A cruise anywhere can encounter very rough sailing, but such conditions are the exception rather than the rule in sheltered waters. I have been aboard a relatively small (11,000 tons) ship taking 35 degree rolls in 20' seas in the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is very well sheltered by Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily, and Italy (the "boot"), and I can assure you that both the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico -- as sheltered as they are -- also get quite rough when a hurricane comes through. Such weather is readily predictable, though, so the major cruise lines invariably send ships elsewhere to avoid it for the comfort of their passengers.

And they most certainly DO sail open ocean. Very few ships actually sail mostly inside passage anymore. It is far more common for the ships to come out, make up a lot of time then go back in. It's been years since "inside passage" sailings did all coastal sailing. I've been on those sailings, and none are like that anymore.

I can't speak for other lines, but GTS Summit very definitely went up the Inside Passage while I was aboard her last summer. Not only was this the route marked on the naviagation charts on public display, but the visibility of land on both sides was wholly consistent (there are a few gaps in the chains of barrier islands).

I also have encountered very rough sailing- almost knocked out of bed on one.

That sonds more indicative of an aberration, such as a tidal wave, than the normal movement of the ship.

Plates knocked down in the dining room.

That's an indication of improper stowage of plates rather than unusual roughness.

One way trips sailing across the Gulf, have a potential for some movement.

Yes, in so far as the Gulf of Alaska is not as sheltered as the Inside Passage. Nonetheless, discernable movement does not mean that conditions are rough.

Let me see if I can put this in perspective. On my last Navy deployment, which was aboard the helicopter carrier USS Saipan (LHA-2) (photo with crew on deck), we crossed the northern Atlantic Ocean in both directions -- eastbound in February and westbound in April -- with thirty foot seas both ways. The ship's chaplain arranged a "steel beach picnic" on the flight deck for Easter Sunday -- but we had to cancel the event because surf was up on the steel beach. There were, quite literally, ten foot to twelve foot waves rolling down the whole length of the flight deck the whole way. In the wardroom (officers' mess), the stewards routinely poured a couple glasses of water on each tablecloth before setting the table to provide enough adhesion so neither the tablecloths nor the dishes would slide off the tables. Ever see that done on a cruise ship?

Round trip Seattle are noted for being the "roughest" since they do a great deal of open ocean.

The Strait of Juan de Fuca (between Vancouver Island and Washington's Olympic Peninsula) is notoriously choppy, so I would expect cruise ships to avoid this route. The Strait of Georgia (between Vancouver Island and the mainland portion of British Columbia) is much smoother.

Be prepared if prone to motion sickness. Enjoy the sailing, I like knowing I'm on a boat.

Seasicness is a question of mind over matter.

If you don't mind, then it doesn't matter. :-)

Seriously, I don't recommend taking medicine for motion sickness. In the very rare circumstance in which one does start to feel queezy, it's best to go out on deck, stand at the rail, get some wind in your face, and look off at the horizon until the feeling subsides.

Norm.
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Old May 25th, 2006, 09:22 AM
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Default The Gulf of Mexico is Sheltered?

"I can assure you that both the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico -- as sheltered as they are -- also get quite rough when a hurricane comes through"

I live on the Gulf of Mexico I am really surprised to find that it is sheltered. I can assure you that during a hurricane is not the only time it gets rough.
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Old May 25th, 2006, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
Karen,

Alaska cruises can indeed encounter very rough sailing.

A cruise anywhere can encounter very rough sailing, but such conditions are the exception rather than the rule in sheltered waters. I have been aboard a relatively small (11,000 tons) ship taking 35 degree rolls in 20' seas in the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is very well sheltered by Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily, and Italy (the "boot"), and I can assure you that both the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico -- as sheltered as they are -- also get quite rough when a hurricane comes through. Such weather is readily predictable, though, so the major cruise lines invariably send ships elsewhere to avoid it for the comfort of their passengers.

And they most certainly DO sail open ocean. Very few ships actually sail mostly inside passage anymore. It is far more common for the ships to come out, make up a lot of time then go back in. It's been years since "inside passage" sailings did all coastal sailing. I've been on those sailings, and none are like that anymore.

I can't speak for other lines, but GTS Summit very definitely went up the Inside Passage while I was aboard her last summer. Not only was this the route marked on the naviagation charts on public display, but the visibility of land on both sides was wholly consistent (there are a few gaps in the chains of barrier islands).

I also have encountered very rough sailing- almost knocked out of bed on one.

That sonds more indicative of an aberration, such as a tidal wave, than the normal movement of the ship.

Plates knocked down in the dining room.

That's an indication of improper stowage of plates rather than unusual roughness.

One way trips sailing across the Gulf, have a potential for some movement.

Yes, in so far as the Gulf of Alaska is not as sheltered as the Inside Passage. Nonetheless, discernable movement does not mean that conditions are rough.

Let me see if I can put this in perspective. On my last Navy deployment, which was aboard the helicopter carrier USS Saipan (LHA-2) (photo with crew on deck), we crossed the northern Atlantic Ocean in both directions -- eastbound in February and westbound in April -- with thirty foot seas both ways. The ship's chaplain arranged a "steel beach picnic" on the flight deck for Easter Sunday -- but we had to cancel the event because surf was up on the steel beach. There were, quite literally, ten foot to twelve foot waves rolling down the whole length of the flight deck the whole way. In the wardroom (officers' mess), the stewards routinely poured a couple glasses of water on each tablecloth before setting the table to provide enough adhesion so neither the tablecloths nor the dishes would slide off the tables. Ever see that done on a cruise ship?

Round trip Seattle are noted for being the "roughest" since they do a great deal of open ocean.

The Strait of Juan de Fuca (between Vancouver Island and Washington's Olympic Peninsula) is notoriously choppy, so I would expect cruise ships to avoid this route. The Strait of Georgia (between Vancouver Island and the mainland portion of British Columbia) is much smoother.

Be prepared if prone to motion sickness. Enjoy the sailing, I like knowing I'm on a boat.

Seasicness is a question of mind over matter.

If you don't mind, then it doesn't matter. :-)

Seriously, I don't recommend taking medicine for motion sickness. In the very rare circumstance in which one does start to feel queezy, it's best to go out on deck, stand at the rail, get some wind in your face, and look off at the horizon until the feeling subsides.

Norm.

I'm glad you are so knowledgable on Alaska sailings, and can determine what went on in my personal examples. And yes, all those sick passengers- shame on them for not having mind over matter.
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Old May 30th, 2006, 01:09 PM
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When we were there in June 06 the OPEN water between Glacier bay and Whittier was 10 foot swells. The bow of the boat would rise and settle over those waves. It was not bad though. If you are prone to motion sickness take the medication or see your doctor for the patch that you put behind your ear. I would rather take the medicina and not need it than not take it and be miserable.

Yes we hit the waves in the Carribean in 2005 when Tropical storm Mitchell went through. The seas were rough and the boat did rock side to side some. You just did not know who was drinking and who was not from the stagering. When the wind is strong from the side it will move the boats some, with or without stabilizers.

Both boats had the stabilixers.
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Old May 30th, 2006, 08:55 PM
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arrowhead55

When we were there in June 06 the OPEN water between Glacier bay and Whittier was 10 foot swells. The bow of the boat would rise and settle over those waves. It was not bad though. If you are prone to motion sickness take the medication or see your doctor for the patch that you put behind your ear. I would rather take the medicina and not need it than not take it and be miserable.

Even the Gulf of Alaska is not as open as you might think. The south side is unprotected, but there's land to the north, east, and west. Although you would feel some motion in ten foot seas on modern cruise ships, though, it would be disturbing only for those who are very prone to motion sickness.

Yes we hit the waves in the Carribean in 2005 when Tropical storm Mitchell went through. The seas were rough and the boat did rock side to side some. You just did not know who was drinking and who was not from the stagering. When the wind is strong from the side it will move the boats some, with or without stabilizers.

A tropical storm certainly would be pretty nasty even with stabilizers, but most cruise ships change itieneraies if necessary to go elsewhere when they come through.

Norm.
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Old June 1st, 2006, 03:39 PM
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[quote="Rev22:17"]arrowhead55



A tropical storm certainly would be pretty nasty even with stabilizers, but most cruise ships change itieneraies if necessary to go elsewhere when they come through.

It is hard to change the itenerary when you are on you last day at sea at the end of the cruise. The captain did go as far west as he could before he headed north according to one gentleman that was on the deck. We had rougher seas before heading into the storm because the wind was hitting the side of the boat. I think they did all they could do to make the last day as easy as they could.


As far as Alaska the rise and fall of the bow was not bad but if you are prone to motion sickness then take the medicine. It does not mean you are a wimp, it means you are smart to plan ahead.
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Old June 1st, 2006, 04:18 PM
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I have been fortunate, while I have missed some excellent chances, I have never been seasick. (knock on wood) I have been boating all of my life in the Gulf, the Pacific northwest and the Great Lakes which either body of water can get very nasty. The Great Lakes are especially treacherous. I have had waves breaking over the flybridge on my 30 footer which is 15 foot high.

On the other hand however, I have had people with me that got so seasick they would lay on the deck and relieve their stomachs all over the place. They would have appreciated being tossed overboard to drown. If you want to see something different, I have even seen a seasick dog.

To make a long story short, if you have any doubt at all about becoming seasick, take the prevention. My wife uses the seasick patch with great success. As it said in a previous post, this isn't being a wimp, this is being highly intelligent. If I had a choice, I would rather be intelligent and enjoy myself that trying to impress someone with my machoism.
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Old June 2nd, 2006, 11:17 AM
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Exactly!!
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Old June 3rd, 2006, 12:00 PM
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Dear me Cassandra what a lot of advice. Rough seas depend on the weather. We have seen 25 and 30 foot seas on two cruises. (East coast of Australia and South Pacific). But we just got off a 35 day cruise from Hong Kong to Vancouver and it was as smooth as a table top the whole way except for one night which was mildly rough. your chances of encountering really rough water on an Alaska cruise are slim. Take some Bonine with you and don't worry about it, You'll be fine
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Old March 17th, 2007, 05:07 PM
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Norm, you do a disservice to those who experience motion sickness. We don't find it amusing. It is not 'mind over matter' - it is a medical condition that you must be very fortunate not to suffer from. I have been in seas up to 30 feet on a cruise (not in Alaska of course) and believe me, it was the rare person who was not sick, crew included.

As to Alaska, as many have said the main problem area is when you are going into open seas heading from the glacier areas towards Seward. You may or may not experience choppy waters there. In the Inside Passage cruises, the vast majority of time you are in sheltered waters. Check your map and itinerary. If you are heading out of the sheltered areas, and suffer from motion sickness, take your dramamine as a precaution.
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Old March 19th, 2007, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenix_dream
Norm, you do a disservice to those who experience motion sickness. We don't find it amusing. It is not 'mind over matter' - it is a medical condition that you must be very fortunate not to suffer from. I have been in seas up to 30 feet on a cruise (not in Alaska of course) and believe me, it was the rare person who was not sick, crew included.

As to Alaska, as many have said the main problem area is when you are going into open seas heading from the glacier areas towards Seward. You may or may not experience choppy waters there. In the Inside Passage cruises, the vast majority of time you are in sheltered waters. Check your map and itinerary. If you are heading out of the sheltered areas, and suffer from motion sickness, take your dramamine as a precaution.

I agree. But even on the so called "Inside Passage" round trip sailings, can and do a portion of open ocean, some more than others. So I would not make the determination based only on route, which isn't fixed anyway. The cpt. can make route adjustments due a big variety of factors. In fact 4 of my rough sailings- with a significant number of people sick, were all round trip Vancouver.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 06:55 PM
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i am going on my very first cruise this july, to alaska, and want to bring anti-motion sickness medication,just in case. can you make suggestions as to the best choices, i don't want to be drowsy from it though. what is the patch?what is the medicine in it? what is bonine? is that a pill? i am definitley a novice at this.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 07:24 PM
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My DD, age 21, unfortunately gets seasick, so we've gone prepared on her 2 cruises. In Alaska, we used the pills called Bonine, which is a less-drowsy version of Dramamine (generic name is meclazine). It worked well for her and didn't make her very drowsy. Unfortunately, we didn't start her on it prior to sailing, so it did take a little while for it to kick in once we realized she was not feeling well. The crew will recommend green apples, and ginger capsules also seemed to help her -- get them at a health food store. A lot of people recommend taking one before bedtime at night, which seems to be enough to get them through the next day without trouble.

For her 2nd cruise, since we knew by then that she was susceptible, we got the patch for her. It did keep her from getting seasick, but one of the side affects can be blurry vision -- and by the 4th day, she couldn't read the menu. The drug in the patch is called scopolomine, and there is a long list of side affects. Some people seem to tolerate it better than others. She's not very big - about 110 pounds -- and from what I've read, larger people tend to have fewer side affects. Personally, she won't be using the patch again.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 08:47 PM
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i do not know a single thing about how rough the water can get because i am going on my first cruise but i DO know an excellent cure for nausea that i'm sure would be great for seasickness...

GINGER!

any form can be helpful but the best is to get either the raw sugared stuff (found in a dried fruit section of the market) or better yet chewy ginger candies (milder flavor but same effectiveness...yummy even if you don't feel sick!) you can also melt the candies into some hot water to make into a tea to sip.

i always recommend it and people are always amazed at its effectiveness... a friend of mine gets terribly carsick (as a passenger it takes her less than 10 minutes to start to feel queasy) nausea medications such as dramamine never had worked for her... i had her eat one piece of ginger candy at the begining of our trip and she did not feel one bit of sickness on our 2 hour drive up windy mountain roads!

regular markets usually do not have ginger candy but health stores and stores that carry a lot of dried fruits do... i know trader joe's has some... even if you bring some other form of cure i recommend bringing a little stash of the candies too... you will not be disappointed!
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Old April 11th, 2007, 09:03 PM
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megs, would this include the altoids ginger candy?
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Old April 12th, 2007, 02:45 AM
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hmmm never tried the altoids stuff... maybe? peppermint is supposed to soothe the stomach as well so it might be worth a try... generally though you want to go for stuff in the rawest form... the altoids i am guessing are ginger flavored but probably mostly made up of other ingredients... crystalized ginger is the strongest and seems to be the most effective (my car sick friend took one little nibble, grimaced, but had a very happy stomach for the rest of the 2 hour trip without having to eat any more) ginger chews are still potent but have a little less bite to the flavor... those two forms are the ones i have always used as they have consistently provided excellent and fast acting relief.

this is one of my favorite brands for the chews... http://www.gingerpeople.com/order_chews.html


the other form of "alternative therapy" for nausea is to get wristbands (i think they sell them at most drugstores) they are designed to press particular acupressure points... i have never tried the bands but one point is about 3 fingers (1 1/2 inches) past the beginning of the wrist... you use two fingers to press on this spot almost as if you are taking a pulse... i have seen some results with the method but the ginger is definitely much more reliable...
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Old April 14th, 2007, 03:38 PM
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For the best options for motion sickness, consult your health care professional. Even over the counter meds can have side effects and interactions with other meds taken.
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Old April 15th, 2007, 07:07 PM
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It can get very rough the first day when you sailed out Seattle. Check with your doctor and see if there is any medicine or wristband as remedy with minimal impact on your daily activities
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Old June 28th, 2007, 03:34 AM
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Just for the record,while crossing the Gulf of Alaska on the Veendam one particular night in 2005 the seas were registering 25-35 ft with the ocasional 50 footer thrown in. I must say I was impressed with the way the ship handled herself but the dining room sure wasn't busy
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Old June 28th, 2007, 04:52 PM
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We always carry the candied pieces of ginger you can buy in bulk at the health food stores (or bug grocery stores). I doubt if any "ginger-flavored" such as altoids or ginger ale will do you much good.

We also use the sea-band wrist-bands.

But those of these are there to prevent sea-sickness and will only have a mild effect (or none at all) it you get the full-blown sea-sickness which is NOT pleasant.

I personally recommend the over-the counter pills meclizine (generic for Bonine), but people should consult their physician. They make you less drowsy that dramamine does.

The mani thing is to take it AT THE FIRST SIGN you are getting seasick. Do not wait until you are nauseated. The first signs are a slight headache, a slight feeling of dizzyness, and maybe a tiredness. If those symptoms come on at about the same time the ship starts moving - then take the medicine.

My DW hates taking any medicine, but even she will give in at this point because true seasickness is no fun at all. Sometimes she just takes a half of one, sometimes a whole one. It has never failed to help her.

If you are already nauseated, though, nothing will help you beyond a shot at the infirmary. You will throw up the pills almost as soon as you swallow them.

They work great for me, by the way. I have endured thirty foot seas with rocking and pitching with no nausea at all. One time I did not take one in time, and I was so sick I wanted to die.

The patch does give a lot of people side-effects - especially doublevision. Not pleasant in my opinion, (but I have never tried one). Some people wear them all the time.
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