Go Back   CruiseMates Cruise Community and Forums > Destinations > Alaska
Register Forgot Password?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old September 14th, 2006, 08:05 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Default steroom port or starboard?

I'm sure this has been asked before but after doing a search I couldn't find anything.

I'm looking at the Vision of the Seas to Alaska it's from Seattle return.
If I get a cabin on the starboard side, will I be on the land side on the return portion? Will I be on the land side at all?

Thanks
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old September 14th, 2006, 08:07 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Default

wwhhhooooppppsss.
I meant to write Stateroom not steroom!!
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old September 14th, 2006, 08:26 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 153
Default

Just to clarify your question... are you on a round trip cruise leaving from Seattle and returning to Seattle?????
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old September 14th, 2006, 08:44 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Default

yes.
It leaves from Seattle, then sea day then the Alaksa ports and inside passage and victoria back to Seattle.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 02:43 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,771
Default

tracey12,

If I get a cabin on the starboard side, will I be on the land side on the return portion? Will I be on the land side at all?

The "inside passage" is a series of deep, and thus navabable, channels between the barrier islands and the mainland extending from Washington's Puget Sound to Icy Strait, at the northern end of the Alaskan panhandle. When a ship is in the inside passage, it has land on both sides. If the captain chooses to navigate on open water instead, the ship will have land on the starboard side when headed northbound and on the port side when headed southbound, but that land might be beyond the horizon in either case.

That said, I would not worry about having a cabin on one side of the ship or the other. How much time will you actually spend in your cabin when you are not either sleeping or engaged in other activities that prevent you from looking at sceneray, anyway???

Norm.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 08:39 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,539
Default

Open ocean sailing in Alaska, has NO views on any side. Unless you want to count- barely spects with binoculars. Round trip Seattle sailings have the most open sailing, the time necessary for the "foreign port" eats up valuable time. If you truely want the most scenic sailing definately go out of Vancouver, inside Vancouver Island is nonstop- CLOSE viewing.

There were considerable changes to the Vision itinerary this year. But in time for many to change.

It won't matter what side you are on. The priority for only glacier viewing from a cabin, requires a port side if sailing Glacier Bay and/or College Fjords.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 04:07 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 25
Default

Thanks for the info.
Sounds like I won't see as much Glacier stuff on the Seattle round trip cruise, but this is one a few other people picked so I'm just going along.
Is it still a worth while cruise, will I get to see glaciers like on the north and south sailings?

My main reason for the post was if I get a balcony, would I have a nice view from the Starboard side or does it not matter which side.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 05:21 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

We've sailed with balcony on both port and starboard and found it made little difference. These were all inside passage cruises round trip from Vancouver or Seattle. When the ship is facing away from the glaciers in Glacier bay you'd want to be up top anyway and the on the balcony when facing the glaciers. One advantage to port when entering Glacier bay is that the main chunk of narration is when entering the bay so you can sit on your balcony, turn on the tv to hear the narration, and enjoy.
It seems as if the Vision is not going to Glacier bay however and is going in Tracy arm to the Sawyer glaciers. You will be very close to land on both sides of the ship when in the fjord. Early in the season you probably won't get close to the glaciers since there will be too many bergs in the water. Later the path is clearer and you can get closer.
Of course in Juneau you can easily get to Mendenhall glacier.
So if you go later in the summer you should be fine for glacier viewing.
I highly recommend the balcony. Some will disagree with me on this but to me, even open ocean is scenery and a balcony is a must.
We did sail once from Seattle by the way and were never out of sight of land during the daylight hours. We weren't really close at times but unlike Karen's trips, we didn't need binoc's to see a speck of land. The land on both sides of the ship was large and beautiful.....just not really close. The scenery obviously depends on the route the Captain chooses.
Enjoy the cruise, you'll have a great time.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Yukon's Avatar
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
Posts: 210
Send a message via MSN to Yukon Send a message via Yahoo to Yukon
Default

If you want to see any glaciers, you need to re-think being on the Vision. They do sail into Tracy Arm in 2007, but most large ships don't get within sight of the Sawyer Glaciers due to ice and/or time contraints. They've also traded Icy Strait (which they went to this year) for Prince Rupert, which I think is a poor trade even though I really like Prince Rupert. As has been said, you get far less Inside Passage scenic sailing on a Seattle departure than on a Vancouver departure, too.

Murray
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old September 15th, 2006, 06:27 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

You might want to look at HAL which has ships that go both to Glacier Bay and Tracy arm on the same cruise. Are you locked on using Seattle? Vancouver trips are more scenic we found but we did like Seattle as well.
IMHO Glacier bay is a must for first and maybe only Alaskan cruise.
Hubbard glacier would be my second choice and then Tracy arm.
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old September 16th, 2006, 03:09 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3,539
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterC
We did sail once from Seattle by the way and were never out of sight of land during the daylight hours. We weren't really close at times but unlike Karen's trips, we didn't need binoc's to see a speck of land. The land on both sides of the ship was large and beautiful.....just not really close. The scenery obviously depends on the route the Captain chooses.
Enjoy the cruise, you'll have a great time.
I am not referring to this, IF you saw "land" on BOTH sides. Seattle sailings DO not sail Inside Vancouver Island unless specifically routed, which few are. I am referring to the first and last sailing day, OF which round trip Seattle, is at best may have distant viewing on ONE side. So your reference is elsewhere, which every ship sails at some point since you can not get to Juneau or Skagway without Inside Passage.

A decent round trip sailing, are NCL Glacier Bay itineraries. Especially with your glacier preference- this is superior if you choose to sail out of Seattle.

My point is the overall, you get way more scenic sailing out of Vancouver. But frankly, FEW people notice, most often, people look "out" coming and going along with ship activites. There are few who truely spend sailing time parked viewing all day, even with balconies.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old September 16th, 2006, 01:13 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

I suppose it's because I consider the first sailing day actually day 2 of the cruise since the ship leaves early 5ish or so on day one......at least on our sailings. Yes, we sailed outside of Vancouver Island that first evening and when we woke the next morning we were surrounded by land although not close. I spend most of the day on our balcony or on deck watching the world go by.
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old September 16th, 2006, 01:20 PM
Senior Member
First Mate
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Stephenville, Texas
Posts: 397
Default stateroom port or starboard side?

Hope it's OK to change the post a little but keep on the same type subject.

We will be on the Volendam mid-June 2007 and will start our cruise in Seward. Can anyone tell me if this will this be a "scenic" cruise through the inside passage or an open water cruise???

June cannot get here quick enough for our first time Alaskan cruise.

Thanks for the info. in advance.

crabbie1
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old September 17th, 2006, 09:48 AM
Yukon's Avatar
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
Posts: 210
Send a message via MSN to Yukon Send a message via Yahoo to Yukon
Default

crabbie - you end up at Vancouver, so its as much of an Inside Passage cruise as it can be when you start off by crossing the Gulf of Alaska. I don't say that as a bad thing, having been on the same itinerary this June.

Murray
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old September 17th, 2006, 11:02 AM
Senior Member
First Mate
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Stephenville, Texas
Posts: 397
Default stateroom port or starboard side?

Thanks Yukon

Have read some posts about not being happy because their brochure said "scenic" route through inside passage and all they saw was sea.

crabbie1
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old September 17th, 2006, 07:03 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

Karen, FYI, I rechecked our home video and we even had land on our first evening after leaving seatle until dark. For some reason we must have gone on the inside of Vancouver island on this trip. I assumed that we'd gone outside.
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old September 21st, 2006, 03:26 PM
Lightsluvr's Avatar
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 221
Default Port side for the Sea Lion colony

Back on topic, on the Vision, either side will be fine, but if the captain stops for the huge sea lion colony, it will be on the port side of the ship. We really enjoyed our portside JS in June. Breathtaking views. Even saw a lone Orca on our way to Juneau. Lots of humpback whales!

LL
__________________
Previous cruises:
Rhapsody - W. Caribbean - 2004; Rhapsody - W. Caribbean - 2005; Sovereign - Bahamas - 2005; Enchantment - Canada/NE - 2005; Rhapsody - W. Caribbean - 2006: Vision - Alaska - 2006
Future cruises:
Navigator - E. Caribbean - 11/2006
Vision - West Coast - 4/2007
Grandeur - Canada/N.E. - 9/2007
Voyager of the Seas -"R"W. Caribbean - 1/2008
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old September 22nd, 2006, 07:31 PM
Senior Member
First Mate
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 282
Default

I just booked aft on Serenade of the Seas Vancouver to Vancouver June 07. I am concerned will it be like looking down a tunnel? But I bet we can see bothsides if we walk to back of balcony. So whats the opinion? Sides or back.
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old February 1st, 2007, 07:31 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 18
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterC
We've sailed with balcony on both port and starboard and found it made little difference. These were all inside passage cruises round trip from Vancouver or Seattle. When the ship is facing away from the glaciers in Glacier bay you'd want to be up top anyway and the on the balcony when facing the glaciers. One advantage to port when entering Glacier bay is that the main chunk of narration is when entering the bay so you can sit on your balcony, turn on the tv to hear the narration, and enjoy.
So if we wanted to hear the narration from our room, which side would we want to be on?
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old February 1st, 2007, 08:46 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

Port....the narration mostly occurs as you're entering Glacier bay and all the glaciers on on port. The narration was heard in the room thru the tv channel and we turned it up and watched from our balcony.
When the ship rotated at Margerie glacier we ran outside to continue viewing.
Reply With Quote
  #21 (permalink)  
Old February 1st, 2007, 09:01 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 18
Default

Is this true for all ships?.....southbound or northbound?

we are going from either seattle or vancouver..so we would be northbound in either case
Reply With Quote
  #22 (permalink)  
Old February 2nd, 2007, 02:26 PM
PeterC's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 534
Default

This is true whether you're coming from northbound or southbound. As you enter the bay the glaciers will be on the port side of the ship. In our 2 trips in the bay we sailed by the Johns Hopkins inlet and all the way to the Margerie glacier. The ships then stopped in front of the glacier and after a period of time they rotated so the other side of the ship had equal time. Once the ship got pretty close and pivoted and the other time the ship was farther away and then did a U-turn and was much closer. All this time the ranger/naturalist is narrating.
As we left the bay (narration pretty much stops then), on one trip we slowed down and hovered at the mouth of the Johns Hopkins inlet. The other trip the ship actually entered the inlet all the way in to the head of it. This is a seal calving sanctuary and whether you go in or not depends on the seals. I think we were lucky when we got to enter.

With luck the Margerie glacier will calve while you're there.
Reply With Quote
  #23 (permalink)  
Old March 15th, 2007, 11:56 AM
Junior Member
Beginner
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1
Default

This is my first visit to this site, as I have been playing elsewhere, but
I HAD to COMMEND you folks on you wonderful explanation of Starboard VS Port.....

I have asked this question several times before, on the other site, and for the life of me, still never understood what they were telling me.....

Our TA had stated, that if you are on a Northbound Cruise, you would want to have a Starboard room, BUT NOW I understand the desire to have PORT!!!!

It's ALL ABOUT GLACIER BAY!!!!
You want PORT for Glacier Bay!!!!!

Now I get it!
Reply With Quote
  #24 (permalink)  
Old March 16th, 2007, 11:18 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 12
Default

UTVOLS, Just curious. There's discussion on the other site. Are you banned and for how long? It's just a shame if you are!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
alaska, alaskan, cruise, land, ncl, northbound, port, portside, round, seattle, ship, side, starboard, trip, vancouver

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PORT OR STARBOARD? Boiler Cuiser Princess Cruise Lines 5 April 1st, 2008 09:28 PM
Port or starboard? Toddie Ask CruiseMates Staff 9 March 11th, 2005 01:27 AM
Port or Starboard butterfly Royal Caribbean International 7 March 8th, 2005 06:32 AM
port or starboard? Willy Princess Cruise Lines 10 September 22nd, 2004 08:46 PM
Port or Starboard stuff&things First-Time Cruisers 3 November 7th, 2002 08:02 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:14 PM.
design by: Themes by Design

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1