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-   -   Motion Sickness - First time Cruisers (http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/all-things-cruising/373410-motion-sickness-first-time-cruisers.html)

DanVik April 22nd, 2010 11:51 AM

Motion Sickness - First time Cruisers
 
We are taking our first cruise the end of May and we are so excited. We obviously want to be as prepared for everything as we can be. To you experienced cruisers, what is the best preventative/relief medication for motion sickness. Some of our friends who have cruised recommended the patch. Tell me what has worked best for you! Thanks for your help!

Mike M April 22nd, 2010 12:09 PM

First of all; congratulations on your cruise.

The truth is that very few people actually get seasick on most of today's cruise ships. If you do not get motion sickness riding in a car or in a small boat it is highly unlikely you will get sick on a cruise ship. My wife is quite susceptible to motion sickness and she has never had a problem on the ship. She used the patch on our first couple of cruises but when she left the patch on for the full seven days she realized that it was more of a placebo effect. :D She hasn't worn one in years.

Having said that: There are a number of "preventatives" that will help in not becoming seasick. The best is Meclizine (brand name Bonine) that is non-drowsy for most people and effectively prevents motion sickness in most people. It is available in almost any drug store, Wal-Mart or Target type of store. If you ask for Meclizine, directly from the pharmacist, it is very inexpensive and non-prescription.

I emphasize "prevent" because almost all of the motion sickness medications such as "The Patch" (scopolamine and only available with a prescription), Meclizine, Dramamine and Gravol are not effective once you become sick. You must begin taking it before you become ill. The only non-prescription treatment that has been medically tested to relieve the nausea of motion sickness is "ginger".

Some people recommend the accu-pressure wrist bands but I have seen no clinical evidence of their effectiveness.

Take care and don't become overly worried about motion sickness.
Mike

april_4_us April 25th, 2010 05:04 PM

I used the patch as well and it worked fine I had no side effects at all and even found if I used it during the flight I didnt get nauseated. Anyways my husband and kids didnt use anything. Hope that helps.
april

LisaK April 28th, 2010 09:59 AM

Mike hit all the points right on, if you aren't prone to motion sickness when you fly or ride in a car then you should not have any problems on a ship, ships have wonderful stabalizers and most of the time you hardly feel the movement except at night when the captain "floors it" lol to get to the next port of call. The patch is for people who suffer from motion sickness, The OTC formulas work really well, i have had great results with the ginger remedy, if i am feeling the least bit queasy i will munch on a ginger candy or have a glass of REAL gingerale.

AF1 April 29th, 2010 12:09 PM

The ships I have sailed on sold the wrist bands in their onboard store. My wife wore the patch behind her ear on our first cruise; she has not needed to wear it since then. The ships are pretty stable, especially if u cruise in the caribbean when the sea is smooth. I have sailed the caribbean and thru europe; no problem with the ship rocking and rolling

colorcrazie May 1st, 2010 02:21 PM

I am very prone to motion sickness. WHile the new, huge ships have very little movement, even there I can have a problem. So, I take ginger daily and if I start feeling just a tad dizzy, which, for me, is the very first hint of motion sickness, I take a meclizine. I carry them in a pocket.
One thing not mentioned here is that if you have ports where you have to tender into shore, using the smaller boats, you can run into a lot of motion, so on those days, I take the meclizine 1/2 hour before I get on the tender.
Marty

mustang sally May 29th, 2010 06:55 PM

I too tend to be carsick so on our first cruise I wore the wrist bands and I never had a problem. Since then I sailed on newer and bigger ships and have never used them again nor have I had a problem.

johnthed0g May 29th, 2010 07:06 PM

Now.... last year we cruised quite a lot & I got dizzy spells on land after the cruise, this eventually went away.....well it's back since we went on Eclipse, coincidence? I have heard of this elsewhere, I think it has a name any clues?? Never get ill onboard & I think the best thing is not to worry about it.

Paul Motter May 30th, 2010 11:44 AM

John...

I forget what people call post-cruise lightheadedness but it is common. It should go away within a week or two.

My wife and I had a very rough cruise om a small ship (about 18,000-tons) which we sailed through the North Atlantic. In fact, our itnerary took us from Hamburg to Scotland and then back to Norway, so we crossed it twice. Then we headed north from Norway towards the Arctic circle.

We had rough seas almost every night for two weeks - and my wife was sick most of the time. It was our worst cruise ever, and in fact we didn't even have much to enjoy in terms of ports either. It was supposed to be an adventure cruise, but we saw no whales, no polar bears, etc. Just a huge disappointment.

Sometimes good cruises go bad. There isn't much you can do about it. I do know now that I will never take a small ship in known rough seas again. The smaller the ship the more you feel the motion. A ship as big a Equinox, however, I would expect you did not feel nearly as much (although I do realize you can feel motion on any ship if the seas are rough enough).

The smoothest ship I have ever sailed on is Oasis - I never even felt it tip.

In rough water, the Queen Mary 2 handles high seas, steaming acrosss the Atlantic as 30 knots, amazingly well. But they did a LOT of original hull design on that ship.

johnthed0g May 30th, 2010 11:58 AM

Eclipse never moved that I noticed, but I reckon it's an inner ear thing that needs to settle down.

Fern May 30th, 2010 08:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnthed0g (Post 1294665)
Now.... last year we cruised quite a lot & I got dizzy spells on land after the cruise, this eventually went away.....well it's back since we went on Eclipse, coincidence? I have heard of this elsewhere, I think it has a name any clues?? Never get ill onboard & I think the best thing is not to worry about it.

John, it's called Mal de Debarquement Syndrome and many people experience that feeling. If it doesn't go away within a few days, taking Dramamine (or another sea sickness med) can help. I agree, not worrying about it is best.

The more we cruise, the less I've noticed this, so the "cure" is to take more cruise's LOL!

johnthed0g May 31st, 2010 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fern (Post 1294831)
John, it's called Mal de Debarquement Syndrome and many people experience that feeling. If it doesn't go away within a few days, taking Dramamine (or another sea sickness med) can help. I agree, not worrying about it is best.

The more we cruise, the less I've noticed this, so the "cure" is to take more cruise's LOL!

Thanks Fern...Is that like alcoholics never getting a hangover!!

Parrot Mom May 31st, 2010 01:39 PM

Sea sick
 
Until recently there was NEVER a cruise I didn't get seasick...The one secret for me is ginger tablets from the health food store..It works on the same thought process or whatever your mother gave you flat gingerale when you had a bad tummy.. I take them as soon as I set foot on the ship...if by chance y ou do get an upset stomach I ask for (although i take the tea bags) mint tea..MD's do not recommend the patches because of the side effects, but if you insist.. at least cut them in half.. The other product I carry with me is Sturgeron..that the yachtsmen in Bermuda use for sailing.. Haven't had a sea sick day in several years... and that is wonderful.

jackharrison September 12th, 2012 07:48 AM

At the time we went for cruise ***Edited to remove commercial reference*** last year, we stored some ginger which provides immediate relief. If you look medicines, the best one will be scopolamine patches; it is worn behind the ear like a tiny band-aid. It is the most common prescription drug for seasickness. Scopolamine also comes in pill form. The patches last up to three days, provide time-release doses of the drug, and are usually very effective for preventing nausea.

Marsdude September 12th, 2012 08:42 AM

I would like to chime in on the ginger bandwagon. I purchased some 100mg ginger capsules and took one everyday. I also had some crystalized ginger root candy that I would munch on on occasion.

We hit some rough seas where everyone was staggering up the stairs and I was fine.

storybookcruises.com September 12th, 2012 04:12 PM

First, all the newest ships have all the latest computerized stabilizing devices. Because of this, they are now alot more stable than cruise ships of old.

Now, with that said, it does not mean you won't get seasick, but chances are fairly slim. And any movement that you get will be completely different that the movement you get on smaller boats. I know people who never get seasick on a small boat but will on a big ship. And I know people who get seasick on a big ship but never on a small boat. Obviously, it affects everyone different. I spent 6 years in the Navy and the first time we ever hit a bad storm and I was on a small ship, I got seasick for 3 days! I would not have been surprised to see my shoes coming out of my mouth I was throwing up so hard!! But as they say, once you get seasick that bad, you'll never get seasick again. And they weren't kidding - I've never gotten seasick or motion sickness again.

They did an episode on Mythbusters about seasickness that I thought was very informative. They tried several different remedies to see which one worked best. They tried the wristbands, Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine is one brand), non-drowsy Dimenhydrinate, Scopolamine patches, and ginger tables. What was most interesting is that they had the best results with simple ginger tablets, which the Chinese have used for thousands of years to help prevent motion sickness. You can get it cheaply over the counter at any drugstore. Who knew?

The thing about any of these medications is that you have to begin using them about 3 days in advance. If you wait until you need them, it's too late.

Alot of people have adverse reactions to the various drug items, which can ruin your vacation, so personally I would want to try the non-drug items first since there are no side affects with them.

If you have a problem with motion sickness on small boats does not necessarily mean you'll have any problems on large cruise ships or vice versa. We were on the Allure of the Seas and at times it was really hard realizing we were even at sea. It is an extremely stable platform, that's for sure.

Pete

JeanW September 12th, 2012 05:27 PM

Thanks for all the replies everybody. I am also very prone to motion sickness, so I'm pretty nervous about our first cruise. I find I don't get sick on deck, hmm, I wonder if the cabin staff would mind making me up a bed on the balcony if the boat is pitching? :-P

I also get terrible dizziness after sailing. (Although I haven't been on a cruise before, I've done quite a lot of sailing on friends' boats.) It lasts for as many days as the sailing trip lasted. I didn't know travel meds were effective in treating that! Oh, if only I'd known I might have saved myself a lot of days spent lying in bed while the whole room went back and forth and round and round every time I shut my eyes. That is a really good tip!

Quote:

Originally Posted by colorcrazie (Post 1289557)
I am very prone to motion sickness. WHile the new, huge ships have very little movement, even there I can have a problem. So, I take ginger daily and if I start feeling just a tad dizzy, which, for me, is the very first hint of motion sickness, I take a meclizine. I carry them in a pocket.
One thing not mentioned here is that if you have ports where you have to tender into shore, using the smaller boats, you can run into a lot of motion, so on those days, I take the meclizine 1/2 hour before I get on the tender.
Marty

Thanks especially for mentioning this, Marty. I hadn't thought about the tenders.


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