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-   -   Telescope on board ship? (http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/all-things-cruising/388205-telescope-board-ship.html)

aerospace March 10th, 2012 05:42 PM

Telescope on board ship?
 
First off would this be allowed?

I've always thought of buying one but light pollution of the city is one of the reasons I've held off. Seems like the middle of the ocean would be ideal(though minimal outside lights on deck might interfere just the same).

Anyone have good experience with a telescope and could offer their thoughts?

I would think it would be an extremely cheap attraction cruiseships could offer as well. All they would need is to mount it on the side somewhere and maybe man it a few hours daily to help find POI. They could lock it down during the day if the risk of damage was to high.

zdgp March 11th, 2012 06:08 AM

Wouldn’t the motion of the ship turn this into an exercise in frustration?

PeterC March 12th, 2012 09:45 AM

as ZDGP suggests, the motion of the ship would make a telescope for looking at the sky, useless. And remember, the motion of the ship is magnified by the same amount as the sky objects being sought out.

MercedMike March 12th, 2012 10:50 AM

Motion
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PeterC (Post 1420166)
as ZDGP suggests, the motion of the ship would make a telescope for looking at the sky, useless. And remember, the motion of the ship is magnified by the same amount as the sky objects being sought out.

Probably true.

HMMM -- it makes you wonder how they got an accurate reading with a sextant?

Paul Motter March 12th, 2012 05:03 PM

Well, I have seen telescopes on many ships, on tripods, in observation lounges, etc.

Now - looking at astral bodies would he harder than islands or other ships, but many ships are actually very stable with almost no movement or even vibration, especially up front (away from the propellers).

PeterC March 12th, 2012 06:03 PM

Looking at the sky wouldn't work at all. If for example you're looking thru a scope at 100 power which would easily resolve the rings of Saturn and the clouds on Jupiter, and if the ship is moving up and down at only 1 ft. That means the planets are moving up and down at 100ft. No way you could watch a planet with that massive movement, even in a wide-field scope.

kandajones March 12th, 2012 06:11 PM

We had a lecturer on board a cruise last year & he set his telescopes up on a couple of the evenings to show everyone the various red, white & blue stars out there (No, he wasn't focused on your flag ;))

He had to readjust every 5 minutes or so, and to be honest, our cheap binoculars were able to give us equally as good images, and a lot easier to pack.

We did have some light polution from the ship, but compared to back home here our part of the UK it was pretty amazing.

Alan & Katrina

Donna March 12th, 2012 08:26 PM

They did have some on Allure of the Seas, aft by the flowriders if I remember correctly.

Marsdude March 13th, 2012 11:58 AM

I would strongly recommend a really good pair of binoculars over a telescope. We forgot our binoculars on our cruise and we really wished we had them several times.

Donna March 13th, 2012 09:01 PM

We always bring them when cruising Alaska, used them a lot.


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