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Old April 3rd, 2012, 11:23 AM
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Default Caution: Weight restrictions

Weight restrictions can be imposed on certain activities. A weight restriction can ruin the day for a cruiser if they violate them. Two activities that come to mind are for horse back riding and cable slides. The maximum weight for each was 250 pounds. Most people would not be concerned about this weight restriction since all cruisemates are slim and svelte, but if the cruisemate is a bit portly it would be better to check beforehand so that you are not disappointed.

Disclaimer: Some activities of the type mentioned may not have any weight restrictions. This depends on the operator. This caution is extended to help cruisemates have a more enjoyable time.
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Old April 3rd, 2012, 11:46 AM
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Exclamation Weight restrictions

Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyprincecharlie View Post
Weight restrictions can be imposed on certain activities. A weight restriction can ruin the day for a cruiser if they violate them. Two activities that come to mind are for horse back riding and cable slides. The maximum weight for each was 250 pounds. Most people would not be concerned about this weight restriction since all cruisemates are slim and svelte, but if the cruisemate is a bit portly it would be better to check beforehand so that you are not disappointed.

Disclaimer: Some activities of the type mentioned may not have any weight restrictions. This depends on the operator. This caution is extended to help cruisemates have a more enjoyable time.
Indeed this is true. In almost every case, the weight restriction is carefully spelled out in advance. Read the descriptions carefully.

If you plan to just get off the ship and find the activities locally, you may be disappointed.

In particular, Alaska helicopters usually have weight restrictions. Passengers over the weight limit may be charged extra and require advance reservations.

Also note that in some cases the vehicles used for tours may be difficult for heavy passengers to fit into.

When you are (like me) in the oversize class you have to do a bit more homework. In many instances we find it is worth our while to book a private tour and check out the vehicle used in advance.
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Old April 3rd, 2012, 12:34 PM
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Statistics say that almost 25% of americans are truly overweight, by as much as 100 pounds.

It seems as if the standard for normal weight has changed in this country, while most of us used to be on the slim side, now most of us tend to be on the other side.

I am not sure why - maybe taking cruises has something to do with it?
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Old April 4th, 2012, 12:31 PM
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I was in really good shape about 10 years back, but still was right up to the 250 range. Went on a horseback riding excursion with the wife & sons... They let me go, but I can still hear the stable hand who was getting us mounted up yell back to his co-worker after sizing me up, "YA BETTER BRING OUT DIABLO!" That's never a good sign...
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Old April 4th, 2012, 01:31 PM
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It is also a good thing to remember that weight restrictions for the helicopter/glacier tours include the coats and boots. So if you are 245 lbs. you will be over when you weigh in. BTW: They do weigh you.

I am also disappointed when I see some of the Mexican horseback riding excursions where they put the 260+ person on a horse that shouldn't handle that weight. They will tell you that the breed can handle these heavy people but that is a load of horse dung. They are just going for the money and could care less about the animal.

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Old April 4th, 2012, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike M View Post
It is also a good thing to remember that weight restrictions for the helicopter/glacier tours include the coats and boots. So if you are 245 lbs. you will be over when you weigh in. BTW: They do weigh you.

I am also disappointed when I see some of the Mexican horseback riding excursions where they put the 260+ person on a horse that shouldn't handle that weight. They will tell you that the breed can handle these heavy people but that is a load of horse dung. They are just going for the money and could care less about the animal.

Take care,
Mike
You know I had not even thought of the helicopter ride weighins. Your caution about clothes and boots as another weight factor is an excellent input. This warning could save people a lot of heartache and lightening up of their wallets.
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Old April 4th, 2012, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Motter View Post
Statistics say that almost 25% of americans are truly overweight, by as much as 100 pounds.

It seems as if the standard for normal weight has changed in this country, while most of us used to be on the slim side, now most of us tend to be on the other side.

I am not sure why - maybe taking cruises has something to do with it?
I like to think it isnt that people are gaining more weight, perhaps what is considered overweight may have changed. I think we all look like our mothers, therefore, our mother's weren't skinny minnys, either!!
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Old April 5th, 2012, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Golden1 View Post
I like to think it isnt that people are gaining more weight, perhaps what is considered overweight may have changed. I think we all look like our mothers, therefore, our mother's weren't skinny minnys, either!!
Plus you can't just go by average weight. With improved nutrition people are getting taller, so you'd expect them to weigh more. In my family my generation is much taller than my older aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc. Same gene pool, but notably different heights.
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Old April 6th, 2012, 11:14 AM
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Exclamation Gene pool?

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Originally Posted by Doug S View Post
Plus you can't just go by average weight. With improved nutrition people are getting taller, so you'd expect them to weigh more. In my family my generation is much taller than my older aunts, uncles, grandparents, etc. Same gene pool, but notably different heights.
I make a huge splash when I belly flop into the gene pool.

Honestly, I am just plain shorter and fatter than any of my ancestors!

Da Truf.

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Old April 6th, 2012, 06:18 PM
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Doug s.....the diablo comment actually made me almost do a 'spit take'

My husband and his friends are going on a cruise in may...all four are over 250....and they all have zip line excursions planned.I keep telling them they may want to look into this more,, but hey, what do I know. So I may be sending them to this thead so they don't think im just being a jerk...lol
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Old May 8th, 2012, 06:11 PM
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Default Coast Guard is addressing weight restrictions but are other countries doing the same.

In Cozumel I saw the ferry boats going leaving the pier and I thought about the new Coast Guard regulation concerning weight. The following article made me think more about the importance of passenger weight.

This article is from the New York Times SEATTLE — In this season of expanding waistlines, even the Coast Guard has been forced to monitor midsections: specifically, the drafts of passenger vessels burdened with transporting an increasingly heavy population.
Related
Times Topic: Obesity: The Big Picture
Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @NYTNational for breaking news and headlines.

The Coast Guard in December formally put into effect rules requiring certain passenger vessels to comply with its new Assumed Average Weight per Person. That new weight, 185 pounds, is a full 25 pounds more than the previous average, 160, a figure put in place about half a century ago — after French fries were invented but before billions and billions had been served.

“Are people bigger now?” said Mark Cedergreen, who began running a charter sport fishing boat out of Westport, Wash., in the 1970s, when the salmon population was healthier and people apparently were, too. “Yes.”

And so vessel operators across the country have faced a reckoning: shed weight, and potentially revenue, by reducing the number of passengers they carry, or find a way to keep squeezing people on without falling out of compliance with the Coast Guard.

Many bigger boats, including the fleet operated by the Washington State Ferries here, have avoided real practical change by simply revising their vessels’ capacity downward. For example, the ferry boat Wenatchee, previously capable of holding 2,000 people, is now said to hold about 1,700. But while the Wenatchee’s vehicle hold sometimes fills, its passenger decks virtually never reach capacity. It is one of the largest ferries in the world. So the chance that the lowered capacity will ever mean turning away passengers is very low.

(“Some fine examples of what we’re talking about just went down the stairs,” said William H. Matchett, a retired English professor at the University of Washington, lifting an eye from Henry James’s “The Golden Bowl” to nod toward some formidable passengers on the Wenatchee recently. “But this is a big boat.”)

Some larger private boats have also avoided real impact. In Savannah, Ga., ferries that cross the Savannah River had to reduce capacity on paper but expect no real impact because they rarely are full. In New York, the World Yacht and Circle Line cruises, which depart from Piers 81 and 83 in Midtown Manhattan, deliberately operate at about 50 percent of capacity, about 300 people, to make for a roomier, more pleasant experience, said Jason Hackett, a spokesman.

The same has been true for the popular Argosy Cruises that operate in the many waterways around Seattle. Argosy had to reduce capacity on four of its boats, said Maureen Black, a spokeswoman for the company, but still had plenty of room to accommodate its usual customer base. Ms. Black also noted that some other details of Argosy boats would allow for bigger bodies.

“Chairs are armless,” she said.

Not every boat can handle extra pounds so easily. The Coast Guard inspects about 6,000 passenger vessels across the country, and many owners of smaller boats have been scrambling to comply. Rather than concede any capacity, many have chosen to undergo new stability tests to try to prove that they can meet the new weight rules and still maintain the same number of passengers.

For boats under 65 feet long, the Coast Guard oversees what it calls a simplified stability test, in which owners simulate full capacity by loading 55-gallon drums of water in various locations on board. The test also requires moving all of the drums to one side in an attempt to simulate what might happen in the event of strong waves, a wildlife sighting — or perhaps a rush to watch a fisherman battle a huge tuna.

Some say the test bears little resemblance to real conditions.

“What we’re finding out is that the test that was designed in the ivory tower of Washington, D.C., doesn’t work in reality, in real water,” said Mr. Cedergreen, of the Westport Charterboat Association.

While most of the boats in the Westport fleet operate well below capacity so there is plenty of space for casting and catching, some say the new Coast Guard rules will hurt their bottom line in other ways.

Dave McGowen, who has led charters on his 50-foot boat Ms. Magoo for 30 years, said his capacity had been reduced to 26 passengers from 30 under the new rules. Mr. McGowen, who is 59, said that he hoped to sell his boat to another charter operator within the next few years, but that the new rules would reduce the number of potential buyers. He estimated that his boat would lose more than $100,000 in resale value. “A buyer wants more capacity so they can make more income,” he said.

Lt. Cmdr. David Webb, an inspector with the Coast Guard Office of Vessel Activities in Washington, noted that while the new capacity rules were only now taking effect, the Coast Guard had been promoting the 185-pound average weight since at least 2006. Changing the weight capacity had been under discussion for several years before that, but momentum increased quickly after 20 people died on a crowded tour boat on Lake George in New York in 2005.

Commander Webb said the Coast Guard had arrived at the new weight figure by averaging the average male weight (194.7 pounds) and female weight (164.7 pounds), as calculated by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, then adding a few pounds for clothing and personal items.

Boat operators are not typically required to weigh passengers, but Commander Webb emphasized that they could not simply trust that the weights of passengers on a given trip indeed averaged 185 pounds or less. While a group of, say, 100 schoolchildren on a tour of Puget Sound might come in well under a boat’s overall capacity, 100 other people could weigh much more.

“Their obligation is really not to exceed overall capacity,” Commander Webb said. “If they’re going to load the college football team on, they have to give that some consideration.”

I did not edit the article because I felt that it would take away from the significance of the report.
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Old May 8th, 2012, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyprincecharlie View Post
Weight restrictions can be imposed on certain activities. A weight restriction can ruin the day for a cruiser if they violate them. Two activities that come to mind are for horse back riding and cable slides. The maximum weight for each was 250 pounds. Most people would not be concerned about this weight restriction since all cruisemates are slim and svelte, but if the cruisemate is a bit portly it would be better to check beforehand so that you are not disappointed.

Disclaimer: Some activities of the type mentioned may not have any weight restrictions. This depends on the operator. This caution is extended to help cruisemates have a more enjoyable time.
Helicopter tours charge a sutcharge for people that weight over 250LBS.
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Old May 10th, 2012, 11:43 AM
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Default What about the life boats on ships, Don't they have to have capacity changed?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bonnyprincecharlie View Post
In Cozumel I saw the ferry boats going leaving the pier and I thought about the new Coast Guard regulation concerning weight. The following article made me think more about the importance of passenger weight.

This article is from the New York Times SEATTLE — In this season of expanding waistlines, even the Coast Guard has been forced to monitor midsections: specifically, the drafts of passenger vessels burdened with transporting an increasingly heavy population.
Related
Times Topic: Obesity: The Big Picture
Connect With Us on Twitter
Follow @NYTNational for breaking news and headlines.

The Coast Guard in December formally put into effect rules requiring certain passenger vessels to comply with its new Assumed Average Weight per Person. That new weight, 185 pounds, is a full 25 pounds more than the previous average, 160, a figure put in place about half a century ago — after French fries were invented but before billions and billions had been served.

“Are people bigger now?” said Mark Cedergreen, who began running a charter sport fishing boat out of Westport, Wash., in the 1970s, when the salmon population was healthier and people apparently were, too. “Yes.”

And so vessel operators across the country have faced a reckoning: shed weight, and potentially revenue, by reducing the number of passengers they carry, or find a way to keep squeezing people on without falling out of compliance with the Coast Guard.

Many bigger boats, including the fleet operated by the Washington State Ferries here, have avoided real practical change by simply revising their vessels’ capacity downward. For example, the ferry boat Wenatchee, previously capable of holding 2,000 people, is now said to hold about 1,700. But while the Wenatchee’s vehicle hold sometimes fills, its passenger decks virtually never reach capacity. It is one of the largest ferries in the world. So the chance that the lowered capacity will ever mean turning away passengers is very low.

(“Some fine examples of what we’re talking about just went down the stairs,” said William H. Matchett, a retired English professor at the University of Washington, lifting an eye from Henry James’s “The Golden Bowl” to nod toward some formidable passengers on the Wenatchee recently. “But this is a big boat.”)

Some larger private boats have also avoided real impact. In Savannah, Ga., ferries that cross the Savannah River had to reduce capacity on paper but expect no real impact because they rarely are full. In New York, the World Yacht and Circle Line cruises, which depart from Piers 81 and 83 in Midtown Manhattan, deliberately operate at about 50 percent of capacity, about 300 people, to make for a roomier, more pleasant experience, said Jason Hackett, a spokesman.

The same has been true for the popular Argosy Cruises that operate in the many waterways around Seattle. Argosy had to reduce capacity on four of its boats, said Maureen Black, a spokeswoman for the company, but still had plenty of room to accommodate its usual customer base. Ms. Black also noted that some other details of Argosy boats would allow for bigger bodies.

“Chairs are armless,” she said.

Not every boat can handle extra pounds so easily. The Coast Guard inspects about 6,000 passenger vessels across the country, and many owners of smaller boats have been scrambling to comply. Rather than concede any capacity, many have chosen to undergo new stability tests to try to prove that they can meet the new weight rules and still maintain the same number of passengers.

For boats under 65 feet long, the Coast Guard oversees what it calls a simplified stability test, in which owners simulate full capacity by loading 55-gallon drums of water in various locations on board. The test also requires moving all of the drums to one side in an attempt to simulate what might happen in the event of strong waves, a wildlife sighting — or perhaps a rush to watch a fisherman battle a huge tuna.

Some say the test bears little resemblance to real conditions.

“What we’re finding out is that the test that was designed in the ivory tower of Washington, D.C., doesn’t work in reality, in real water,” said Mr. Cedergreen, of the Westport Charterboat Association.

While most of the boats in the Westport fleet operate well below capacity so there is plenty of space for casting and catching, some say the new Coast Guard rules will hurt their bottom line in other ways.

Dave McGowen, who has led charters on his 50-foot boat Ms. Magoo for 30 years, said his capacity had been reduced to 26 passengers from 30 under the new rules. Mr. McGowen, who is 59, said that he hoped to sell his boat to another charter operator within the next few years, but that the new rules would reduce the number of potential buyers. He estimated that his boat would lose more than $100,000 in resale value. “A buyer wants more capacity so they can make more income,” he said.

Lt. Cmdr. David Webb, an inspector with the Coast Guard Office of Vessel Activities in Washington, noted that while the new capacity rules were only now taking effect, the Coast Guard had been promoting the 185-pound average weight since at least 2006. Changing the weight capacity had been under discussion for several years before that, but momentum increased quickly after 20 people died on a crowded tour boat on Lake George in New York in 2005.

Commander Webb said the Coast Guard had arrived at the new weight figure by averaging the average male weight (194.7 pounds) and female weight (164.7 pounds), as calculated by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, then adding a few pounds for clothing and personal items.

Boat operators are not typically required to weigh passengers, but Commander Webb emphasized that they could not simply trust that the weights of passengers on a given trip indeed averaged 185 pounds or less. While a group of, say, 100 schoolchildren on a tour of Puget Sound might come in well under a boat’s overall capacity, 100 other people could weigh much more.

“Their obligation is really not to exceed overall capacity,” Commander Webb said. “If they’re going to load the college football team on, they have to give that some consideration.”

I did not edit the article because I felt that it would take away from the significance of the report.
e
Don't the lifeboat capacity on the cruise ships have to be revised due to these new Coast Guard regulations?
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