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  #1 (permalink)  
Old March 13th, 2002, 06:25 PM
HannaS77
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Default Weighing A Cruise Ship

How and why do they weigh a cruise ship ? Should be right up the alley for those cruise ship afcionados.
Hanna S77
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Old March 13th, 2002, 06:44 PM
Rix Rix is offline
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

Hanna;

I would guess its much like the way they have weigh stations for big semi trucks. By size and weight they can charge more for ports and Canal transits etc. As lager ships in tons are introduced, comes and aray of environmental impact issues to deal with as well.. sure there are plenty more reasons Rix :-)
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Old March 13th, 2002, 07:44 PM
Billie Jo Jack
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Default Wine

Sailing on Victory. Are you allowed to bring your own wine?
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Old March 13th, 2002, 10:22 PM
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

First, they get this REALLY BIG scale ....
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Old March 13th, 2002, 11:36 PM
Carole Dunham
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Default Re: Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

I believe they weigh the amount of water a ship displaces. Not that they actually do it since they know the weight of water. Just calculate it.

Carole
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Old March 14th, 2002, 12:30 AM
Rix Rix is offline
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

Sorry Pamda I think Carol is on the right trax.
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Old March 14th, 2002, 08:58 AM
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

Google strikes again ...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Background Discussion - Peter Stocker; gohaze@telus.net

It has been said that the measurement of tonnage is as much an art as it is a science. As soon as a tonnage regulation is brought out myriad Naval Architects, Engineers, Designers, et al immediately see how they can get around it to their benefit.

The word 'tun' was originally a size of cask in which wine was shipped from Iberia (Spain & Portugal) to England, and in 1347 a tax of 3 shillings per tun was imposed and this was called 'tonnage'. A ship's size became known by the number of casks it could carry, and gradually the word tonnage superceded the word burthen which had been used previously. It was found that with the design of ships in those days that if one took the length x the breadth x the depth of the hold under the deck and divided by 100 it was close to the number of casks. Hence we have the "Measurement ton" of 100 cubic feet per ton still in use today.

Gross Tonnage - the one most commonly quoted in the cruise industry because it makes ships seem bigger - is the internal volume in cubic feet of the ship minus certain spaces above the main or tonnage, deck which are called "exemptions" .

Net Registered Tonnage - this one Ship Owners like to keep as small as possible as it is commonly used for things like harbor dues and other taxes - is the Gross Tonnage less certain non earning spaces and allowances which are called "deductions"

Displacement Tonnage - is the actual weight of the water "displaced" by the ship and is usually quoted in long tons of 2240 lbs.

Light Displacement Tonnage - this is when the ship is built with nothing in it.

Loaded Displacement Tonnage - this is when a ship is fully loaded to the maximum and is on her Summer draft in Salt Water..

Deadweight Tonnage - is the difference between Light and Loaded Displacement Tonnage....the Actual carrying capacity of the vessel.

Panama & Suez Canal Tonnages - these are different to the international ones. There used to be a lot of variations between countries and they thought they were being conned, so they came up with their own for everyone.

Other tons in common use are the "Short Ton" of 2000 lbs, particularly in the US, but not much at sea. The "Metric Ton" or tonne which equals 2204 lbs. and this is becoming more used.

So, we have different "tonnages" for different uses. Passenger ship owners like a large Gross to make their ships appear bigger than the competition, and a small Net to save money. Tanker owners use Deadweight tonnage to show how many actual tons of oil the ship will carry, and the World's Navies use Displacement as their ships weigh heavy for their volume, and to impress or lie to their friends and enemies.

Peter Stocker; gohaze@telus.net
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Old March 14th, 2002, 09:57 AM
Robocop
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

Pamda's last is the guide. Cruise ships use the Gross Regerstered Tons for thier use. This is why the Voyager Class is so much more than say the Destiny Class even though from the outside they are very close to the same size. It is the huge main street on the Voyager Class that makes the big differance.
Jim
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Old March 14th, 2002, 08:42 PM
mlbcruiser
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Default Re: Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

Thanks for the very interesting explanation. I knew it was space, but could not have explained it. This subject came up on our last cruise & I think my neighbor, who was along & is an engineer, probably thought I didn't know what I was talking about when I said it wasn't weight per se, like 2,000 lbs. per ton. I'm glad you set many people straight on this!
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Old March 15th, 2002, 01:41 AM
Ken Ken is offline
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

This brings up the ever-confusing passenger/space ratio equation, which is Gross Tonnage divided by Passenger Capacity. The Gross Tonnage of the GTS Summit, for example is 91,000 tons and the listed capacity is 1,950 passengers. Dividing 91,000 by 1,950 gives you a space ratio of 46.67 per passenger Ė but 46.67 what? Is that 46.67 square feet per passenger? I recall having read that any ratio over 40.00 would be considered generous, meaning spacious, but these figures can be misleading. The Summitís listed capacity of 1,950 is based on double occupancy of each cabin, but some of those cabins can hold more than two passengers, which lowers the space ratio, which leads to confusion which meansÖ well, I donít know what it means except that Iíll be the one searching out a quiet space on deck without a lot of traffic so I can look at the ocean in peace!
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Old March 18th, 2002, 09:03 AM
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Default Re: Weighing A Cruise Ship

I. Space ratio is an artificial figure useful only as a comparison. In the Premium Brands, 46.something is not bad at all! It is a very useful tool in evaluating ships and in placing them within their categories.

2. Gross Registered Tonnage. The "official" definition of a gross registered ton:

"100 cubic feet of ENCLOSED space to which PASSENGERS HAVE ACCESS". To be counted, the space must be enclosed (which is why GRT changes so frequently on vessels) and must be open to passengers (hence the engine room, for one, is not counted in the calculation.

Ernie
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