Go Back   CruiseMates Cruise Community and Forums > Cruise Deals. Cruise Questions and Answers! > Ask CruiseMates Staff
Register Forgot Password?

Ask CruiseMates Staff Got a question? Our staff will do its best to help.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old May 9th, 2011, 09:37 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 208
Default Power strips : Banned or not?

I've seen several people suggest taking a power strip, especially if you've got more than one or two things to plug in ( electric razor, various chargers, etc.). However, I also read that Carnival won't allow them and the cabin stewards will confiscate them. We've booked a cruise on the Liberty, and having a power strip is a great idea, but not if it's banned. So, can anyone tell me what Carnival's policy is on power strips? Thanks.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old May 9th, 2011, 11:16 PM
Marc's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 3,625
Default

This is what I found on Carnival website:

Quote:
• Electrical devices such as fans, power strips, multi plug box outlets/adaptors, and extension cords will be removed if determined to pose a hazard and returned the last day of the cruise prior to debark.
Going over their banned items, I was really surprised to see dive tanks. What happens when you want to bring your own dive equipment?

Here is the link to FAQ which includes baggage restrictions:

Frequently Asked Questions, Information | FAQs | Carnival Cruise Lines

Here is another surprise:

• Fish Caught on Fishing Expeditions: The fish cannot be brought on board; it must be shipped home.

When we cruise and people have caught fish, they have often brought them back onboard to be cooked. Why go on a fishing expedition if you can't eat your catch?
__________________
Marc

"The test of a first rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."

F Scott Fitzgerald

Seven Seas Voyager (30nts) - Dubai - Cape Town - Nov 14
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 12:31 AM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 208
Default

Electrical devices such as fans, power strips, multi plug box outlets/adaptors, and extension cords will be removed if determined to pose a hazard and returned the last day of the cruise prior to debark.

Thanks, Marc. Now my question is, who determines if a power strip or extension cord poses a hazard? The Purser's Desk? Housekeeping? Maintenance? If the item is in good condition ( no exposed wires, no electrical/duct tape holding it together), then it shouldn't be a problem.
Has anyone recently sailed on a Carnival Ship and had their power strip or extension cord confiscated?
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 01:24 AM
HawkeyeFLA's Avatar
Senior Member
First Mate
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 417
Default

On a side note, I just use my laptop to charge everything. All of my portable devices use some nature of USB cable to charge, with the exception of my digital cameras. The 20D has its own charger, and the A720IS uses AA batteries and I just bring a pack of disposables for it. But everything else I might bring with me has some kind of USB option to charge it. So as long as I have a power plug for my laptop, everything else is going to get charged.
__________________


Past cruises:

Disney Dream - Dec 2013 4n Bahamas
Disney Dream - Dec 2012 4n Bahamas
Carnival Imagination - Dec 2011 4n Western
Carnival Imagination - Nov 2010 4n Western
Costa Atlantica - Dec 2009 7n Eastern

My opinions are mine and mine alone. They do not represent the opinions of The Walt Disney Company nor any of its subsidiaries.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 03:05 AM
Kuki's Avatar
Moderator
Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Right here :)
Posts: 22,385
Send a message via AIM to Kuki
Default

When the rule was initiallly put in place to ban power strips and extension chords they were actually enforcing the rule and confiscating them. I'm not sure who that has played out over time, as the negative reaction was pretty strong.

I do know if anyone needs chords for devices, like CPAP machines, they just had to explain the medical need and they were allowed to bring them onboard.

I also believe, rather than bare wires, they were more concerned with extra demands on the wiring, and power necessary to multipule devices.
__________________
Kuki
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 12:04 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: So Ca
Posts: 117
Default

We just got off a Carnival cruise two days ago. Upon boarding, my bag didn't get to our cabin and about eight I went down to find out why.

The girl at the counter asked me if I had any liquor in it and I said no. She then sent me to an area where a bunch of bags were that the tags had fallen off of, it wasn't there either. When I went back she took me into a room that had about ten or so bags in it and one of them was my bag. She then asked out loud if anyone knew why this bag was there and no one seemed to know so she told me to take it.

After reading this thread, I'll bet that the X-ray screener had it pulled because of my power strip. BTW, I used it and my cabin steward never said a word.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 03:50 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc View Post
This is what I found on Carnival website:



Going over their banned items, I was really surprised to see dive tanks. What happens when you want to bring your own dive equipment?

Here is the link to FAQ which includes baggage restrictions:

Frequently Asked Questions, Information | FAQs | Carnival Cruise Lines

Here is another surprise:

Fish Caught on Fishing Expeditions: The fish cannot be brought on board; it must be shipped home.

When we cruise and people have caught fish, they have often brought them back onboard to be cooked. Why go on a fishing expedition if you can't eat your catch?
A charged scuba tank has the explosive power of several sticks of dynamite. All you have to do to set it off is leave it in a corner and wait for the ship to roll a bit. The tank falls over and the valve on top breaks off. Many passengers will be killed by the explosion.

Unfortunately we can't fix stupid. Far too many people go to Walmart and purchase those 99 cent made in china power strips that have no fuses or breakers inside them. They do not even have copper wires, but some cheap material that burns when overloaded.
Then they manage to plug these strips into the 220 volt power points in their cabins.
As soon as they plug a 110 volt appliance into the power strip, the appliance is fried and the power strip bursts into flames.

The Center for Disease Control in the USA requires all cruise ships calling at US Ports to purchase fish and beef only from US Certified Vendors. The idea is that these vendors guarantee that the fish and beef have no poisons, sewage, drugs, or other harmful substances in them.
There are no US Certified Vendors outside the USA.
The captain of a fishing boat in central America really doesn't care what substances might be in the fish you are catching from his boat.
The cruise lines don't want to take any chances cooking something you bring onboard. If you get sick, who is blamed and sued?
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 04:46 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 208
Default

"Unfortunately we can't fix stupid. Far too many people go to Walmart and purchase those 99 cent made in china power strips that have no fuses or breakers inside them. They do not even have copper wires, but some cheap material that burns when overloaded.
Then they manage to plug these strips into the 220 volt power points in their cabins.
As soon as they plug a 110 volt appliance into the power strip, the appliance is fried and the power strip bursts into flames."

There may be some validity to what you say, Bruce. However, after making a couple of phone calls to Carnival,at both their 1-800 number and the
Guest Relations number, and talking to three or four people, I think the answer is a bit simpler than that. While I wasn't able to find out how many cabins are linked together on a circuit breaker, or what those circuit breakers are rated for, my guess would be 30 amps, which is sufficient for each cabin's light fixtures and a two or three items that draw a low amount of amperage. Throw in a couple of items (such as a blow dryer or curling iron) that draw a higher amount of amperage, and (sing along with me) "Pop Goes The Breaker". Happens to us every Christmas when the vacuum sweeper is plugged into the same circuit as the Christmas tree. While I wouldn't call that a hazard, it sure is aggravating. And I'm sure the maintenance people on the ship have better things to do with their time than to go around resetting popped circuit breakers. So, to prevent the breakers from being overloaded, Carnival prefers that guests not use power strips or extension cords. I would guess if someone did have a power strip and it wasn't confiscated, that meant somebody (security or the cabin steward) looked the other way. I don't think I'll risk it, and limit the items we take that require electricity.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 05:00 PM
Marc's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Chafkin1 View Post
A charged scuba tank has the explosive power of several sticks of dynamite. All you have to do to set it off is leave it in a corner and wait for the ship to roll a bit. The tank falls over and the valve on top breaks off. Many passengers will be killed by the explosion.

Unfortunately we can't fix stupid. Far too many people go to Walmart and purchase those 99 cent made in china power strips that have no fuses or breakers inside them. They do not even have copper wires, but some cheap material that burns when overloaded.
Then they manage to plug these strips into the 220 volt power points in their cabins.
As soon as they plug a 110 volt appliance into the power strip, the appliance is fried and the power strip bursts into flames.

The Center for Disease Control in the USA requires all cruise ships calling at US Ports to purchase fish and beef only from US Certified Vendors. The idea is that these vendors guarantee that the fish and beef have no poisons, sewage, drugs, or other harmful substances in them.
There are no US Certified Vendors outside the USA.
The captain of a fishing boat in central America really doesn't care what substances might be in the fish you are catching from his boat.
The cruise lines don't want to take any chances cooking something you bring onboard. If you get sick, who is blamed and sued?
Empty tanks are also banned.

As for fish, Captains have bought fish straight from fishing boats before. In the one instance I saw, it was off Norway. I have also heard of it happening in other locations around the world. These have been on ships that occassionally call in the USA.

I have also seen people bring their fish onboard and have it cooked; not in American waters.

I guess all rules have their exceptions????
__________________
Marc

"The test of a first rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."

F Scott Fitzgerald

Seven Seas Voyager (30nts) - Dubai - Cape Town - Nov 14
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 05:25 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc View Post
Empty tanks are also banned.

As for fish, Captains have bought fish straight from fishing boats before. In the one instance I saw, it was off Norway. I have also heard of it happening in other locations around the world. These have been on ships that occassionally call in the USA.

I have also seen people bring their fish onboard and have it cooked; not in American waters.

I guess all rules have their exceptions????
ALL compressed gas tanks are banned by US Coast Guard and the cruise line's insurance company.
They do make exceptions for compressed oxygen for health purposes, but will only allow very small bottles, and never more than 3 in one cabin.

Captains bring fresh fish onboard all the time. But the CDC officially will not allow us to cook and serve it to passengers. Strangely they do not seem to care if crewmembers eat it.
Every time my ship stops in Cabo San Lucas, I bring several kilos of fresh fish onboard for sashimi - unfortunately only for me.
Ships that do not call at US ports do this all the time - for passengers and crew.
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 05:37 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RTALLEN View Post
"Unfortunately we can't fix stupid. Far too many people go to Walmart and purchase those 99 cent made in china power strips that have no fuses or breakers inside them. They do not even have copper wires, but some cheap material that burns when overloaded.
Then they manage to plug these strips into the 220 volt power points in their cabins.
As soon as they plug a 110 volt appliance into the power strip, the appliance is fried and the power strip bursts into flames."

There may be some validity to what you say, Bruce. However, after making a couple of phone calls to Carnival,at both their 1-800 number and the
Guest Relations number, and talking to three or four people, I think the answer is a bit simpler than that. While I wasn't able to find out how many cabins are linked together on a circuit breaker, or what those circuit breakers are rated for, my guess would be 30 amps, which is sufficient for each cabin's light fixtures and a two or three items that draw a low amount of amperage. Throw in a couple of items (such as a blow dryer or curling iron) that draw a higher amount of amperage, and (sing along with me) "Pop Goes The Breaker". Happens to us every Christmas when the vacuum sweeper is plugged into the same circuit as the Christmas tree. While I wouldn't call that a hazard, it sure is aggravating. And I'm sure the maintenance people on the ship have better things to do with their time than to go around resetting popped circuit breakers. So, to prevent the breakers from being overloaded, Carnival prefers that guests not use power strips or extension cords. I would guess if someone did have a power strip and it wasn't confiscated, that meant somebody (security or the cabin steward) looked the other way. I don't think I'll risk it, and limit the items we take that require electricity.
Cruise ship cabin electrical systems are quite complex. We group the cabins together in 3s and 4s.
There are actually 2 systems in each cabin.
The ship's working voltage in accommodations areas is 220 volts.
Since so many people from North America are challenged with the voltage the rest of the world uses, we install step-down transformers in the void spaces between the cabins, to reduce the ship's working voltage to limited 110 volts in cabins.
These step-down transformers are very expensive and can produce 110 volt power with limited wattage.
If passengers plug in too many high wattage machines in to the 110 volt power points, these transformers can overheat. In extreme cases, they can burn. A fire between the walls of passenger cabins would be very hard to extinguish.
You would be amazed at how many geniuses bring - or try to bring - blenders, electric BBQs, coffee makers, high wattage hair dryers, microwaves, electric steamers, etc.
Since we can't fix stupid, we can only hope to slow them down.
Taking away power strips forces the dumber ones to plug in one dangerous device at a time.
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 06:15 PM
reverendjeff's Avatar
Senior Member
First Mate
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Norman,Oklahoma (Home of the SOONERS)
Posts: 495
Red face

Bruce, excuse my ignorance, but do you work on a ship? I enjoy the information you post and if you do work on a ship I would like to ask you technical questions from time to time. (At least technical to me.)
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 08:12 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

Reverend,
Yes, I do work on a ship.
I have managed more than 2 dozen cruise ships in my career.
Ask away.
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 09:12 PM
Phil&Liz's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,979
Send a message via Yahoo to Phil&Liz
Default

If you truely need the strip, take it. Tag it with a note that says it is for medical equipment.

If you can do without it, leave it at home.
__________________
The Original Phil & Liz

The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money. Margaret Thatcher

Never take an idiot travelling, you can always pick one up when you get there. Billy Connolly

I Didn't Come here and I ain't Leaving.
Willie Nelson

9/01/2013 Carnival Legend
2/16/2014 BC 7

Bill Murray
20 years ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old May 10th, 2011, 10:57 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 208
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Chafkin1 View Post
Cruise ship cabin electrical systems are quite complex. We group the cabins together in 3s and 4s.
There are actually 2 systems in each cabin.
The ship's working voltage in accommodations areas is 220 volts.
Since so many people from North America are challenged with the voltage the rest of the world uses, we install step-down transformers in the void spaces between the cabins, to reduce the ship's working voltage to limited 110 volts in cabins.
These step-down transformers are very expensive and can produce 110 volt power with limited wattage.
If passengers plug in too many high wattage machines in to the 110 volt power points, these transformers can overheat. In extreme cases, they can burn. A fire between the walls of passenger cabins would be very hard to extinguish.
You would be amazed at how many geniuses bring - or try to bring - blenders, electric BBQs, coffee makers, high wattage hair dryers, microwaves, electric steamers, etc.
Since we can't fix stupid, we can only hope to slow them down.
Taking away power strips forces the dumber ones to plug in one dangerous device at a time.

Yes, transformers do tend to get a bit warm. Unless the step-down transformers are well ventilated, putting them in the void spaces between cabins doesn't seem to be a very good idea. I can certainly understand the potential for some serious problems, and banning items that draw a lot of amperage is the best way to avoid those problems. But I would think that certain safeguards (i.e. quick-blow circuit breakers) have been wired into the electrical system to keep the risk of fire to a minimum. And although I've never looked before, aren't all of the outlets in each cabin the GFCI type? If not, they should be.
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old May 11th, 2011, 02:18 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

There are many safeguards built into modern ship's electrical systems. If they are all working properly, we are safe. But as anyone who cruises frequently can tell you, cruise ship equipment and systems quite frequently experience problems and do not operate as designed, hoped, and planned.
The recent Carnival fire off the Mexican coast is a very good example of an electrical system going wrong.
Rather than tempt fate, we try to err on the side of caution and keep all our passengers alive.
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old May 11th, 2011, 03:04 PM
Snoozeman's Avatar
Moderator
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bosque County, Texas
Posts: 5,430
Send a message via AIM to Snoozeman Send a message via Yahoo to Snoozeman
Default

Bruse, I have really enjoyed your posts over the years.

Thanks for a very good perspective.
__________________
Ray McDonald / Snoozeman

My Personal Cruise Blog: My Cruise Blog

Future Cruises:
Carnival Triumph-Caribbean-7/28/2014, Carnival Legend-South Pacific-8/30/2014, MSC Preziosa-Mediterranean-10/25/2014, MSC Fantasia-Mediterranean-11/2/2014, Navigator of the Seas-12/14/2013, Norwegian Jewel-1/3/2015, Emerald Princess-1/11/2015, Carnival Freedom-2/2/2015, Carnival Freedom-2/15/2015.
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd, 2011, 02:56 PM
Junior Member
Welcome Newcomer
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 6
Default

We went on Carnival Elation at Christmas 2010 and took a power strip. It was not confiscated.
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd, 2011, 05:57 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ibiza
Posts: 517
Default

Most cruise companies - including the one I work for - didn't ban the cords in 2010.
Now they do.

What is your point?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
ban, bring, california, cheap, chinese, code, cord, cords, cruise, extension, hide, outlets, power, ship, ships, strip, strips

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Power Strips djstrachan Norwegian Cruise Lines 1 March 1st, 2007 04:22 PM
Balcony and power strips questions glasshalffull99@yahoo.com Ask CruiseMates Staff 5 August 5th, 2006 06:13 PM
Power/Outlet strips, Question Set2cruz Ask CruiseMates Staff 13 August 29th, 2004 10:03 AM
Power strips??? Seebee Cruise Dress / Packing 6 April 7th, 2004 04:59 PM
Power Strips CruiseJune Carnival Cruise Lines 5 April 2nd, 2004 10:16 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:06 PM.
design by: Themes by Design

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1