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Old October 11th, 2006, 10:34 AM
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Default Solstice offically started

Celebrity announced today they began the building process...

http://www.rclinvestor.com/phoenix.z...813&highlight=

Don
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Old October 11th, 2006, 12:36 PM
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A new era emerges for Celebrity. I think it is going to be interesting but I miss the smaller ships but will reserve any judgment until I sail a Solstice ship.

Take care,
Mike
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Old October 11th, 2006, 05:38 PM
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Don,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don
Celebrity announced today they began the building process...
From your link:

The line's President Dan Hanrahan today ceremoniously pressed the start button for the plasma cutter at shipbuilder Meyer Werft in Papenburg, Germany, creating the ship's first steel plate.

Sigh....

Remember the good old days when the start of construction of a ship was the ceremonial laying of the keel?

Actually, new ships do not have keels in the strict sense and there are no more ways. Now, most shipyards build new ships in sections, then weld the sections together in a drydock. To launch the ship, they simply flood the drydock and move the hull to a pier for fietting out.

Norm.
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Old October 12th, 2006, 02:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
Remember the good old days when the start of construction of a ship was the ceremonial laying of the keel?
Actually, new ships do not have keels in the strict sense and there are no more ways. Now, most shipyards build new ships in sections, then weld the sections together in a drydock. To launch the ship, they simply flood the drydock and move the hull to a pier for fietting out.
Norm.
Remember that in the "good old days", steel cutting also began long before keel laying. Today´s "keel laying" is when the first section is put into the building dock. At JLM this usually takes place some 18 weeks after first steel has been cut. That is also a more ceremonial event, when the coin is laid under the "keel".
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Old October 12th, 2006, 08:36 PM
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Hi Roland,

I'm not familiar with this :

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland
At JLM this usually takes place some 18 weeks after first steel has been cut. That is also a more ceremonial event, when the coin is laid under the "keel".
Can you expound?
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Old October 13th, 2006, 02:17 AM
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Fern,
I meant to say that the "ceremonial laying of the keel" will take place in Papenburg some 18 weeks after first steel cutting.
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Old October 13th, 2006, 08:18 PM
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Fern,

Can you expound?

In traditional construction of ships, the first step in the actual assembly of a ship was to lay the keel on the ways. The "ways" basically were long bars leading to the ocean, often fitted with rollers to faciliate the launch ofhte vessel in modern times, and the keel was essentially a very stury horizontal beam that effectively became the structural spine running along the centerline at the very bottom of the ship. Once the keel was in place, the shipyard would attach ribs curved to the form the hull to both sides of the keel, fit horizontal braces between the ribs to maintain proper spacing, and affix an exterior covring to the ribs. They also attach the stem to the front of the keel (it actually becomes part of the keel structure, bending upward in a tight arc called the "knee," and attach additional ribs to the stem with associated bracing and exterior covering. They would then attach interior supports for the decks, machinery, and internal systems to the ribs. The main deck, at the top of the ribs, also had extensive bracing so the overall structure. Once the hull was complete, the shipyard could launch it (slide it down the ways into the water) and move it to a pier for completion of construction ("fitting out") before the ship entered service. Nonetheless, the laying of the keel and the launching were major events marking the beginning of construction and the floating of the vessel, and thus came to be occasions for speical ceremonies. At the launching ceremony, it's traditional for the ship's "sponsor" (by custom, always a woman) to break a magnum of champagne over the bow of the ship just before the actual launch. Naval ships have a third formal ceremony, called "commissioning," at the completion of construction when the crew formally takes posession of the ship and goes aboard to place her into service.

As I noted in my earlier post, most shipyards now build ships by a completely different method. They divide the length of the ship into seven or eight sections, then build each section on dry land in a modular fashion. Each module may, but need not, have a segment of keel. When the modules are structurally complete, they hoist each module with a crane, lower it onto blocks in a drydock, and weld it to the adjacent modules. When all the modules are in place, they flood the drydock, float out the completed hull, and move the hull to a pier for "fitting out" as before. On many of Princess's new ships, you can tell where the module boundaries are because the first digit of each cabin's number is the module in which the cabin is located. The process of floating the hull out of drydock for the first time is analogous to a traditioanl launch, and often accompanied by the same ceremony (the sponsor smashes the magnum of champagne over the bow just before the yard workers open the valves to flood the drydock), but there's not really an event analogous to the laying of the keel because the construction does not start in the same way. What Roland said, in essence, is that some shipyards hold a ceremnoy similar to a traditionl keel laying when they weld the first two sections of the ship together because this marks the beginning of final assembly.

I should point out that there's another major difference between the design of traditional ships and the design of many modern crusie ships. In tradtional ships, the hull physically stops on the main deck (or the promenade deck on a cruise ship) and the portion of the ship that's above that deck is constructed as a separate building -- usually after the launch of the vessel, at the "fitting out" pier. On many modern cruise ships, by contrast, the hull extends all the way up to the top of the ship and the promenades, balconies, etc., are formed by either uncovered areas or cut-outs in the covering, located between the structural members of the hull in either case.

BTW, the first shipyard to use the modern methos of shipbulding was Kaiser's shipyard, turning out "escort carriers," in World War II. As a publicity stunt, that yard once "built an aircraft carrier" (mated and welded together the modules) in a week.

Norm.
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Old October 13th, 2006, 08:54 PM
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Thanks, Norm!
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Old October 13th, 2006, 10:12 PM
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BTW, the first shipyard to use the modern methos of shipbulding was Kaiser's shipyard, turning out "escort carriers," in World War II. As a publicity stunt, that yard once "built an aircraft carrier" (mated and welded together the modules) in a week.

Norm.[/quote]

And they built one of the transports that they were most famous for in 1 day, also as a publicity thing I think to push war bonds. Boy do we need a few of those people now in a lot of different ways.....

Don
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Old October 13th, 2006, 10:27 PM
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Don,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
And they built one of the transports that they were most famous for in 1 day, also as a publicity thing I think to push war bonds. Boy do we need a few of those people now in a lot of different ways.....
There are some brilliant people working on national defense even today. Theck out this web site!

Norm.
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Old November 19th, 2006, 01:29 PM
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I wonder if it will have the azipod system that M class have? when is the projected completion date?
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Old November 19th, 2006, 06:41 PM
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hcat,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
I wonder if it will have the azipod system that M class have?
In view of the ongoing lawsuit between Celebrity Cruises and the manufacturer of the Azipod units on the vessels of the Millennium class, I doubt that Celebrity would approve use of Azipod units from the same manufacturer on any new vessels. I'm not aware of any public information regarding the propulsion system, but I think that a conventional shaft would be the better choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
when is the projected completion date?
Solstice - Fall 2008

Equinox - Summer 2009

Third Vessel (Unnamed) - Fall 2010

Norm.
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Old November 19th, 2006, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
In view of the ongoing lawsuit between Celebrity Cruises and the manufacturer of the Azipod units on the vessels of the Millennium class, I doubt that Celebrity would approve use of Azipod units from the same manufacturer on any new vessels.
I believe Celebrity will be using the Azipod propulsion system in their newbuilds. Though no doubt they'll be going with a different manufacturer.

There's several companies which manufacture these systems, and there's many other ships sailing that are equipped with them that have had very few difficulties.

Carnival was one of the first cruise lines to equip ships with Azipods, and you rarely hear about problems with theirs.

The fuel savings and manouverablity of these systems offer the cruise line's significant savings..... when they're working properly.
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 05:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuki
Carnival was one of the first cruise lines to equip ships with Azipods, and you rarely hear about problems with theirs.
HAL's Oosterdam is limping along with a defective pod until dry dock in the spring. She is sailing weakly weekly out of San Diego.

But yes Celebrity is truly special with their M-class problems.
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 08:09 PM
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C 2 C,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
HAL's Oosterdam is limping along with a defective pod until dry dock in the spring. She is sailing weakly weekly out of San Diego.
That strikes me as totally irresponsible on the part of the cruise line. If the other pod fails at sea in the interim, the ship will be without propulsion -- a VERY dangerous situation -- and the company will have a pretty steep bill to get a tug to the ship to tow it back to port. I salute Celebrity for getting ships into drydock promptly for repairs whenever these pods break down.

Yes, I'll admit that Celebrity's diecsion to cancel cruise to Alaska when GTS Summit went into emergency drydock in June 2005 was a downer, but the full refund and free cruise on the same itinerary a month and a half later more than made up for the initial disappointment!

Norm.
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