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Old February 16th, 2008, 01:50 AM
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Default Stockholder Shares/discount

Can anyone tell me about this and how one goes about purchasing them?
What type of discount do you receive and does it depend on how many
shares of stock you buy? How far ahead do you have to do this before
you reserve a cruise??
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Old February 16th, 2008, 04:54 AM
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There is no discount but an onboard credit for people holding 100 or more shares of RCI stock. The credits are:

$250 Onboard Credit per Stateroom on Sailings of 14 or more nights.
$200 Onboard Credit per Stateroom on Sailings of 9 to 13 nights.
$100 Onboard Credit per Stateroom on Sailings of 6 to 8 nights.
$50 Onboard Credit per Stateroom on Sailings of 5 nights or less.
Applicable on any Royal Caribbean, Celebrity Cruises or Azamara Cruises Sailings. (excludes Celebrity Xpeditions)

This is how you go about taking advantage of this benefit.

Provide your name, address, confirmation number, ship and sailing date along with a copy of your shareholder proxy card or a current brokerage statement showing proof of share ownership in Royal Caribbean Cruises, Ltd.
Via Mail: RCL Investor Benefit, PO Box 025511, Miami, Florida 33102-5511
Via Fax: 1-305-373-6699
Via Email: shareholderbenefit@rccl.com

Take care,
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Old February 16th, 2008, 05:23 AM
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I have been using the shareholders credit for several years, and I have
received shipboarb credit on 6 celebrity cruises, and this coming may I'm getting a credit on a RCL cruise. I think I'ts a good deal.

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Old February 17th, 2008, 09:17 PM
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Default Re: Stockholder Shares/discount

Sherrie,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Platt
Can anyone tell me about this and how one goes about purchasing them?
You can buy and sell shares of Celebrity's parent company, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. (NYSE: RCL), only through a licenced stock broker.

Quote:
What type of discount do you receive and does it depend on how many
shares of stock you buy? How far ahead do you have to do this before
you reserve a cruise??
As others have stated, you must own at least one hundred (100) shares to obtain the benefit, which is in the form of a shipboard credit (not a reduction of the price of a cruise). The amount of the credit depends upon the length of the cruise, as Mike posted. You will not get an additional credit for ownership of more shares, and it's limited to one credit per cabin (so if two eligible shareholders with separate shipboard accounts share a cabin, each gets half). The benefit is in addition to the normal returns (dividends and growth in price over the long term) that you would expect on the stock, and you can use it as often as you cruise. The company introduced this benefit for an initial period of one year about four or five years ago, and has renewed it annually since.

The official announcement of the benefit, which includes instructions as to how to obtain it, and a FAQ about the benefit are available on the parent company's investor web site.

Personally, I hold considerably more than the minimum 100 shares to obtain the benefit because I think that this company has a great future that will pay nice returns to its investors. Nonetheless, I need to state the usual disclaimers that the stock of Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. mignt or might not be a suitable investment for you and that informing you of this benefit does not constitute either a solicitation to buy or an offer to sell the stock. You should consult your broker, accountant, or other personal financial advisors for advice tailored to your financial situation.

Norm.
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Old February 18th, 2008, 01:53 PM
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Norm: Thanks for all the info - question?? - can you get double shipboard
credits?? for instance - as a stockholder and if that particular cruise is
offering onboard credit to all bookings in general??
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Old February 18th, 2008, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherrie Platt
Norm: Thanks for all the info - question?? - can you get double shipboard
credits?? for instance - as a stockholder and if that particular cruise is
offering onboard credit to all bookings in general??
Often times the share holder credit can not be used in conjunction with any other coupon or certain discounts. In all fairness it should be mentioned that these stock holder credits are also available on virtually every other cruise line.

One thing that I might add to Norm's well written dissertation on buying RCL stock is that I can't think of any poorer reason to buy RCL stock than to maybe get a $100 on board credit for a cruise. I am not a big stock holder in RCl, as Norm said he was, and in fact I do not own any cruise lines stocks.

My opinion, which has the exact amount of twenty-twenty hindsight as Norm's has, would be that given the poor economic climate here in the US and world wide, coupled with rising fuel prices and world wide terrorist threats, would make buying stock in any cruise line not very appealing to me. If tough times should come, and I sure hope they don't, common sense says that cruising would be the first thing that people would take out of their budget and thus cruise stock prices would fall.

Just my opinion.
Debra
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Old February 18th, 2008, 09:53 PM
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Thanks Debra: You made some very good points - I am new to this stockholder "perk" and didn't realize that most other lines do this as well.
I certainly know what you mean about the economy - I am in cosmetic
sales (direct selling) and even though my company is a household name
for over 100 years - I find that doing business with me when my customers cut back on spending is tops on their list. Also, living in Western
New York where the general economy is not that great and the NYS system of taxation is killing our middle class is no picnic.
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Old February 19th, 2008, 06:52 PM
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Sherrie,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Norm: Thanks for all the info - question?? - can you get double shipboard
credits?? for instance - as a stockholder and if that particular cruise is
offering onboard credit to all bookings in general??
It's not "double credits," but the shareholder benefit is fully combinable with any other offer. On my first Transatlantic cruise, for example, I had a total of $650 shipboard credit -- $200 onboard booking credit, an additional $200 rebooking credit for rebooking after Celebrity changed the ship's schedule, and $250 shareholder credit. A combined credit of $400 or $450, depending on the length of the cruise, has been more typical.

Norm.
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Old February 19th, 2008, 09:15 PM
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IMO a weak economy may not be so bad for the cruise industry. A land vacation is usually a lot more expensive when you factor in all the things that you have to spend money for.

Manuel
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Old February 19th, 2008, 11:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherrie Platt
Thanks Debra: You made some very good points - I am new to this stockholder "perk" and didn't realize that most other lines do this as well.
I certainly know what you mean about the economy - I am in cosmetic
sales (direct selling) and even though my company is a household name
for over 100 years - I find that doing business with me when my customers cut back on spending is tops on their list. Also, living in Western
New York where the general economy is not that great and the NYS system of taxation is killing our middle class is no picnic.
Sherrie:

You are very welcome.

Debra
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Old February 26th, 2008, 04:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
Sherrie,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Norm: Thanks for all the info - question?? - can you get double shipboard
credits?? for instance - as a stockholder and if that particular cruise is
offering onboard credit to all bookings in general??
It's not "double credits," but the shareholder benefit is fully combinable with any other offer. On my first Transatlantic cruise, for example, I had a total of $650 shipboard credit -- $200 onboard booking credit, an additional $200 rebooking credit for rebooking after Celebrity changed the ship's schedule, and $250 shareholder credit. A combined credit of $400 or $450, depending on the length of the cruise, has been more typical.

Norm.
Norm - there has been an instance where the shareholder credit was not combinable. Celebrity held a sale earlier that had decreased deposits and onboard credits and you could not use your shareholder credit with it. We were thinking of booking, but our shareholder credit was more than the onboard credit that was offered with that sale.
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Old February 27th, 2008, 09:16 PM
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Debra,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
One thing that I might add to Norm's well written dissertation on buying RCL stock is that I can't think of any poorer reason to buy RCL stock than to maybe get a $100 on board credit for a cruise. I am not a big stock holder in RCl, as Norm said he was, and in fact I do not own any cruise lines stocks.
One obviously should evaluate the stock as an investment, just as one would with any other investment.

That said, the amount of the credit depends on the length of the cruise. I have been averaging about $450/year in shipboard credit since I typically take a cruise of ten or eleven nights and a cruise of fourteen nights. At the current stock price, that represents an annual return of about 12% on an investment of the minimum of 100 shares to qualify for the credit -- and it's in addition to the company's quarterly dividend (currently $0.15 per share per quarter, or $60 per year on 100 shares, which is about average for "blue chip" stocks) and likely appreciation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
My opinion, which has the exact amount of twenty-twenty hindsight as Norm's has, would be that given the poor economic climate here in the US and world wide, coupled with rising fuel prices and world wide terrorist threats, would make buying stock in any cruise line not very appealing to me. If tough times should come, and I sure hope they don't, common sense says that cruising would be the first thing that people would take out of their budget and thus cruise stock prices would fall.
Historically, cruise lines have done very well in times of economic difficulty because cruises are a lot less expensive than vacations at most resorts ashore. It seems that people who decide that they can't afford to go to Disney World are likely to take a cruise instead. I took several in 2002 and 2003, in the wake of the "9/11" attack, and every one of them was sold out.

Norm.
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Old February 28th, 2008, 01:27 PM
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[quote="daysatsea"]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
Sherrie,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Norm: the shareholder benefit is fully combinable with any other offer.
Norm.
Norm - there has been an instance where the shareholder credit was not combinable. Celebrity held a sale earlier that had decreased deposits and onboard credits and you could not use your shareholder credit with it. We were thinking of booking, but our shareholder credit was more than the onboard credit that was offered with that sale.
daysatsea: Thanks for confirming what I said early, on this thread, that these stockholder credits are not combinable with all other offers from Celebrity.

Besides the glowing report and statistics of the small benefits of having a stock holder credit, the risk inherent to in any such purchase should be the prime consideration. Since we had some statistics on the wonderful benefits of owning RCI stock then there should also be a few facts about the other side of the coin, which is often neglected.

Had one purchased the minimum 100 shares of RCI stock the first week of last November for the price at that time which was about $52 per share, to get a stock credit and took a one week cruise you would have received a $100 on board credit from Celebrity. Initial investment $5,200. With the RCI stock price, as of the close yesterday of about $39 per share, (value $3,900) you would be looking at a loss of about $1,300, for your 100 share minimum purchase. Now in that case you would have needed to take 13 one week cruises to be even, not counting trade commisions and what interest you could have made elsewhere with your $5,200 investment. Now I am sure someone would say, well the solution is to take more cruises on Celebrity but then there is this little problem that I have, and that is, that I can not afford to take 13 cruises!!! In fact, I can barley scrape enough to take one cruise per year.

Granted, there can be some small benefit to owning stock but the downside for me far outweighs any benefit from a small on board credit. I am not "in love" with any particular cruise line and enjoy going on different cruise lines and ships and the change adds to the enjoyment of my vacation. Not owning stock in any particular cruise line also allows me to price shop when looking for a particular itinerary and this almost always more than offsets any stockholder credit that I could have received. It is great that we all can have different opinions but both sides of any issue should always be considered and not just one side.
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Old February 28th, 2008, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Debra
daysatsea: Thanks for confirming what I said early, on this thread, that these stockholder credits are not combinable with all other offers from Celebrity.

Besides the glowing report and statistics of the small benefits of having a stock holder credit, the risk inherent to in any such purchase should be the prime consideration. Since we had some statistics on the wonderful benefits of owning RCI stock then there should also be a few facts about the other side of the coin, which is often neglected.

Had one purchased the minimum 100 shares of RCI stock the first week of last November for the price at that time which was about $52 per share, to get a stock credit and took a one week cruise you would have received a $100 on board credit from Celebrity. Initial investment $5,200. With the RCI stock price, as of the close yesterday of about $39 per share, (value $3,900) you would be looking at a loss of about $1,300, for your 100 share minimum purchase. Now in that case you would have needed to take 13 one week cruises to be even, not counting trade commisions and what interest you could have made elsewhere with your $5,200 investment. Now I am sure someone would say, well the solution is to take more cruises on Celebrity but then there is this little problem that I have, and that is, that I can not afford to take 13 cruises!!! In fact, I can barley scrape enough to take one cruise per year.

Granted, there can be some small benefit to owning stock but the downside for me far outweighs any benefit from a small on board credit. I am not "in love" with any particular cruise line and enjoy going on different cruise lines and ships and the change adds to the enjoyment of my vacation. Not owning stock in any particular cruise line also allows me to price shop when looking for a particular itinerary and this almost always more than offsets any stockholder credit that I could have received. It is great that we all can have different opinions but both sides of any issue should always be considered and not just one side.
The shareholder benefit is combinable with a lot of other onboard credits such as the onboard booking credit, an onboard credit given by Celebrity for problems that happened, etc.. The reason that it was not combinable with that special promotion is covered in both the FAQ's on the Investors Relations Website and on the form for the shareholder credit. I was pointing out to Norm that Celebrity did just have an instance where the shareholder credit could not be used if you used the special sale.
We have used a combination of onboard credits several times - for example: shareholder credit, onboard booking credit, and a delay of sail credit on the same cruise.
From the Royal Caribbean Investor Relations website IR FAQ's regarding the credit:
Quote:
Can this offer be combined with other offers, onboard credits and coupons?
Yes, this offer is combinable with other offers, onboard credits and coupons. The offer is NOT available to company employees, travel agents, tour conductors and/or others utilizing complimentary or reduced-rate cruise fares.
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Old February 29th, 2008, 07:33 PM
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Debra,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse
Besides the glowing report and statistics of the small benefits of having a stock holder credit, the risk inherent to in any such purchase should be the prime consideration. Since we had some statistics on the wonderful benefits of owning RCI stock then there should also be a few facts about the other side of the coin, which is often neglected.

Had one purchased the minimum 100 shares of RCI stock the first week of last November for the price at that time which was about $52 per share, to get a stock credit and took a one week cruise you would have received a $100 on board credit from Celebrity. Initial investment $5,200. With the RCI stock price, as of the close yesterday of about $39 per share, (value $3,900) you would be looking at a loss of about $1,300, for your 100 share minimum purchase. Now in that case you would have needed to take 13 one week cruises to be even, not counting trade commisions and what interest you could have made elsewhere with your $5,200 investment. Now I am sure someone would say, well the solution is to take more cruises on Celebrity but then there is this little problem that I have, and that is, that I can not afford to take 13 cruises!!! In fact, I can barley scrape enough to take one cruise per year.

Granted, there can be some small benefit to owning stock but the downside for me far outweighs any benefit from a small on board credit. I am not "in love" with any particular cruise line and enjoy going on different cruise lines and ships and the change adds to the enjoyment of my vacation. Not owning stock in any particular cruise line also allows me to price shop when looking for a particular itinerary and this almost always more than offsets any stockholder credit that I could have received. It is great that we all can have different opinions but both sides of any issue should always be considered and not just one side.
Some years ago, a passenger on a train got talking to a famous investment guru who happened to be in the next seat. The passenger told the investment guru that he would like to invest in stocks, but that he was very reluctant to do so because he could not figure out what the market was going to do. "Oh, I can tell you exactly what the market will do!" the guru replied. Overhearing this, dozens of heads in nearby seats perked up their ears to hear what the guru was going to say. The guru continued, "The market will fluctuate."

And the stock markets do indeed fluctuate. For every stock on the market, you can find a period when its price dropped by 25% -- as in your example -- without trying very hard. Nonetheless, the market's fluctuations are biased upward. Over the course of two centuries (from 1801 to 2000), the New York Stock Exchange posted a compound annual return of 10.8% per year in dividends and appreciation of share value, for a net real return of 8.8% per year after adjustment for inflation -- and that's including every listed company that went bankrupt during that period due to mismanagement, obsolecense, and other causes. Healthy growth companies often produce returns that are much higher than the market average for their investors.

The stock market is not an appropriate place to invest money that you will need to spend in the near term (less than five years) precisely because it does fluctuate. Nonetheless, stocks produce the largest average compound rate of return, over the long term, of any investment that's available to most individual investors.

Let me repeat that statement. Stocks produce the largest average compound rate of return, over the long term, of any investment that's available to most individual investors.

You don't have to take my word for this, since many highly respected authors in the area of personal finance including Dave and Tom Gardner (The Motley Fool Investment Guide), Berton Malkiel (A Random Walk Down Wall Street), and Jeremy Siegel (Stocks for the Long Run) have demonstrated it beyond question. In fact, the real danger to one's financial security is supposedly "safe" investment vehicles, like savings accounts and "money market" funds, that don't even match the rate of inflation, thus eroding the real value of one's capital over time.

So the real question here is not whether the volatility of the market can cause a stock to drop in value in the short term, but rather whether Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. (NYSE: RCL) presents a greater risk than the other stocks that one might have in one's portfolio.

And there, I think not. In fact, I think that Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. will post above average growth going forward -- which is precisely why I own more than the minimum number of shares to obtain the shareholder benefit.

Norm.
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Old February 29th, 2008, 08:14 PM
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Good conversation here. So glad the risks vs rewards have been discussed!
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Old March 1st, 2008, 12:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
...................................... I think that Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. will post above average growth going forward -- which is precisely why I own more than the minimum number of shares to obtain the shareholder benefit.

Norm.
Hi Norm: We clearly disagree about the long term prospects for RCL stock and it certainly can be said that both our opinions are just that -- just the opinions of two people and nothing more. My Gardner may very well have much better financial advice than either one of us. I never thought anybody would buy "pet rocks", so that shows how good my crystal ball is working! Sometimes I am reminded of a person who you can ask what time it is and they will tell you how to build a watch!

My opinion (with no ownership of any cruise line stock) as I said before, is that given the current world financial conditions and the current conditions and mechanical problems of some Celebrity ships that in my opinion RCL will not post above average growth going forward.

I am not pushing Carnival, parent company to Princess (sorry I can't give the NYSE code!) but the benefits of the Princess past passenger program out weigh any stockholder credit from Celebrity. That coupled with the Carnival stock shareholder program would make the deal even better. I however would never take it upon myself to encourage anyone to buy any stock based on my recommendation.

The best stock advice that you will see on this thread is this; if you are thinking about investing in the stock market seek advice from a qualified professional, who is unbiased, and not from any anonymous person on the Internet. If the stock professional happens to recommend a cruise line stock then you are in luck with those on board shareholder credits!!!!!
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Old March 3rd, 2008, 07:02 PM
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Debra,
Quote:
Hi Norm: We clearly disagree about the long term prospects for RCL stock and it certainly can be said that both our opinions are just that -- just the opinions of two people and nothing more. My Gardner may very well have much better financial advice than either one of us. I never thought anybody would buy "pet rocks", so that shows how good my crystal ball is working! Sometimes I am reminded of a person who you can ask what time it is and they will tell you how to build a watch!

My opinion (with no ownership of any cruise line stock) as I said before, is that given the current world financial conditions and the current conditions and mechanical problems of some Celebrity ships that in my opinion RCL will not post above average growth going forward.
Yes, we have different takes. Nonetheless, the market tends to overreact to bad news. In the wake of the "9/11" attack, the price of Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. plummeted to about $13/share because, after all, nobody would travel outside the United States so the cruise industry was a-going to die... or so many investors thought! Of course, those of us who recognized the overreaction and thus took advantage of the "fire sale" have been rewarded quite handsomely.

I am not pushing Carnival, parent company to Princess (sorry I can't give the NYSE code!) but the benefits of the Princess past passenger program out weigh any stockholder credit from Celebrity. That coupled with the Carnival stock shareholder program would make the deal even better. I however would never take it upon myself to encourage anyone to buy any stock based on my recommendation.[/quote]

Carnival Corporation (NYSE: CCL) and Carnival Plc. (LSE: CCL) have a weird corporate structure that effectively causes both companies to share a common fate. They have the same directors and corporate officers, and each owns a "special voting share" in the other that effectively maps the share of each company's stockholders into the other so that they effectively operate as one company. The "special voting share" becomes an absolute veto if the other company's stockholders reject a proposal on a matter that requires separate approval by the shareholders of each company. Thus, shares of both companies are effectively equivalent and will remain so unless the shareholders of both companies vote to terminate the current relationship.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
The best stock advice that you will see on this thread is this; if you are thinking about investing in the stock market seek advice from a qualified professional, who is unbiased, and not from any anonymous person on the Internet. If the stock professional happens to recommend a cruise line stock then you are in luck with those on board shareholder credits!!!!!
I agree.

Of course, it would not be imprudent to ask one's broker or other financial advisors specifically about Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. and specifically about the additional return that the shareholder benefit would provide.

Norm.
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Old March 4th, 2008, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nurse Debra
The best stock advice that you will see on this thread is this; if you are thinking about investing in the stock market seek advice from a qualified professional, who is unbiased, and not from any anonymous person on the Internet. If the stock professional happens to recommend a cruise line stock then you are in luck with those on board shareholder credits!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by you

I agree.

Of course, it would not be imprudent to ask one's broker or other financial advisors specifically about Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. and specifically about the additional return that the shareholder benefit would provide.

Norm.
It would also not be imprudent to ask one's broker or other financial advisors about Carnival Corp or many other great cruise lines that are out there. Given the far superior past passenger program for Princess and the fact that Princess as well as many other cruise lines offers the same or better stock ownership program for getting those on board credits. Another fact that can not be denied is that the past passenger program on Princess far exceeds the meaningless past passenger offered by Celebrity. As I said I do not own nor do I have any large interest, or any interest for that matter, in pushing any stocks of any cruise line given the economic climate that now exists around the world.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 12:02 AM
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Well, Debra, I, for one, am not a fan of Princess so unless they gave me
the Presidential Suite, with prepaid tips, onboard credits, and R/T airfare,
I won't have to worry about owning any of their stock.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:13 PM
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Debra,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
It would also not be imprudent to ask one's broker or other financial advisors about Carnival Corp or many other great cruise lines that are out there.
Of course not.

But this is the Celebrity Cruises discussion board, so I suspect that most of the folks here are looking for information about Celebrity Cruises and not some other line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Given the far superior past passenger program for Princess and the fact that Princess as well as many other cruise lines offers the same or better stock ownership program for getting those on board credits. Another fact that can not be denied is that the past passenger program on Princess far exceeds the meaningless past passenger offered by Celebrity. As I said I do not own nor do I have any large interest, or any interest for that matter, in pushing any stocks of any cruise line given the economic climate that now exists around the world.
This is precisely where we diverge.

>> MV Grand Princess has the most dysfunctional layout of any ships on which I have cruised, and Princess's subsequent classes of "Post-Panamax" vessels have copied all of the deficiencies. I have no desire whatsoever to cruise aboard any of these tubs. Ever.

>> I'm also very turned off by Princess's horrible implemetation of "Personal Choice Dining" that routinely fails to accommodate passengers who prefer "Traditional Dining," especially on the larger vessels. In my experience, service suffers when one does not have the same waitstaff every evening. On my Dad's last cruise, which was aboard MV Golden Princess, he was about No. 476 on the wait list for first seating in "Traditional Dining" -- which means that they had enough passengers on the wait list for first seating to fill another main dining room -- and the ship made no attempt to accommodate them.

>> There was a noticeable change in the attitudes of passengers aboard Princess's vessels after changed its policies for the new millennium. The combination of relaxation of dress codes (which consisted, specifically, of (1) replacement of "semiformal" evenings with "casual" evenings and (2) reductions in the number of "formal" evenings on some cruises) and the "personal choice cruising" advertising campaign drew a significant number of passengers with belligerent attitudes ("It's my #@$%ing vacation and I'll do what the #@$% I want!") who did not comply with stated policies, including dress codes, resulting in a marked change in the ambiance of the cruise.

So if you like Princess, please cruise with Princess. I promise that our paths will never cross aboard ship because I, for one, will play "propulsion pod roulette" on Celebrity's Millennium class any day rather than returning to what Princess has become!

Norm.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 06:31 PM
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Sherrie,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Well, Debra, I, for one, am not a fan of Princess so unless they gave me
the Presidential Suite, with prepaid tips, onboard credits, and R/T airfare,
I won't have to worry about owning any of their stock.
You're easy!

My requriements (as of today):

>> 1. Ship must be MV Sun Princess, MV Dawn Princess, MV Sea Princess, MV Coral Princess, MV Island Princess, MV Pacific Princess, MV Tahitian Princess, MV Royal Princess, or a new ship that I deem acceptable.

>> 2. Contractual guarantee of second seating in "Traditional Dining" in writing as condition of booking.

>> 3. Contractual guarantee of enforcement of evening dress codes throughout ship, except designated casual areas stipulated in guarantee, as condition of booking.

>> 4. All other passengers sign written statement that they understand that the ship will enforce evening dress codes as condition of booking.

>> 5. I get first pick of cabin.

>> 6. I also get to choose the itinerary.

>> 7. And finally, the stockholders of Carnival Corporation (NYSE: CCL) and Carnival Plc. (LSE: CCL) vote to terminate the present merged operations, with Princess Cruises remaining part of Carnival Plc., effective before the start of the cruise.

Don't hold your breath!

Norm.
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Old March 5th, 2008, 07:07 PM
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Norm: You're tooooo funny - when you get all this in writing from Princess with a GUARENTEE - can I come along??? My friends and I need someone
to "got to bat" for us with Princess. My major turnoff with Princess was
the VERY indifferent attitudes of the staff - had a bartender in a small
bar tell us to go elsewhere at 9:30 pm as he was closed - there were 8
of us and he didn't even give us the courtesy of a "last call". Also, even
though the food was excellent - the overall atmosphere of the ship was
like a nursing home. Don't get me wrong - I can't party into the wee hours
but when you walk through the casino and piano bars at 10 pm and it's
like a ghost town - you wonder "where are the people?? Is everyone in
bed???" Also, watching two officiers (same sex) embracing and kissing
on the deck wasn't exactly what I had in mind for entertainment.
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Old March 7th, 2008, 12:27 AM
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Hi Norm:

Since you listed a few of your requirements here are just a few of my
requirements:

1. A ship that does not have a design defect that causes propulsion failures on a very regular basis; i.e. 35 total weeks of crippled cruise ships between the Infinity and Millennium last year (2007) alone.

2. Ships that are well maintained and you can see out of the observations windows.

3. Cruise line that stands behind its product when there are problems.

4. An honest and helpful customer service department.

5. Cruise line that offers a past passenger a loyalty program that actually has some value.

Until Celebrity achieves these goals I think I will stick with Princess or HAL.

It is great to have choices.

Happy sailing to all.
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email: debra2106@yahoo.com
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