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Old November 8th, 2002, 05:12 PM
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Default Where is it more profitable?

Question for all you cruisers: Do you think it's more profitable for the cruiseline when the ship is in port or when it is at sea?

Consider that when at sea; the casino is open, the bars are working, the shops are selling, the spa is booked, etc. However, the gas is burning, the food is served, the workers are at it, the water systems are hummin'.

Consider when in port; the shore excursions are loaded up, the bars have some business, the food demand is less, there is no gas consumption, there's not a lot of towels being washed, not a lot of dishes, water demand is less.

What do you all think?

Regards,
Thomas
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Old November 8th, 2002, 05:29 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

You obviously have too much time on your hands, Thomas. (This is NOT a personal attack, it's a gentle tease.)

I have to guess that profitability is based on a per cruise, rather than a per diem basis.

Shore excursions are a profit center, just as lots of other things are.

Of course, if I knew the answer to youe questions, Micky and Maddie Arison would be staying in my guest room
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Old November 8th, 2002, 05:44 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

My guess is sea days. But the cruise lines have to offer port days because a lot of people cruise to see the world.

Just a guess!

Cheers,
Michelle B.

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Old November 8th, 2002, 06:02 PM
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Default Re: Re: Where is it more profitable?

Well sure it's based on a per cruise, BUT that is affected by the parts which make up that cruise.

I know how much profit is in each menu item I sell, but I know how much in sales I must make each month to have a profit.

So do you think, oh Queen of Queeg, the cruise line would rather stay docked, or sail?

Regards,
Thomas
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Old November 8th, 2002, 06:19 PM
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Default grand old lady

There's one ship that makes a profit and it's docked all the time.


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Old November 8th, 2002, 06:30 PM
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Default Re: grand old lady

Good one Bernie!

Regards,
Thomas
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Old November 8th, 2002, 07:08 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

Thomas ...

Oh, sail, fersure.

Even in port the power plant has to run (even though not as intensely when at sea), linens must be washed, and staff/crew overhead doesn't change whether at sea or in port.

The cost of lunch probably goes down when in port because often the main dining room isn't open.

Consider the profit centers. Booze, casino, shopping, spa .... Once at sea, the cruisers are a captive audience.

So, I would say that the shps make more profit when at sea than in port.

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Old November 9th, 2002, 10:55 AM
AR
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Default Re: Re: Where is it more profitable?

We may have had an interesting practical lesson on this the other week on the Brilliance. The port azipod went down while we were at sea. We missed one port, had an extra sea day, then pulled into Portland a couple hours later than scheduled.

The itinerary called for us to leave Portland for Boston at 7pm, arriving for disembarkation at the usual 7am or so. Even before we got to Portland the captain announced that we wouldn't leave until 9pm because technicians would be boarding there and he wanted to give them maximum time to fix the pod.

During second seating dinner the captain announced that we wouldn't be leaving until 11pm, because he wanted to give the techs more time.

We left at 11 with the pod still not fixed, meaning that we were running at significantly reduced speed. Even so, we were in Boston when we woke up.

Scheduling a run for 12 hours that was easily accomplished in 8 at reduced power seems to indicate that the lines want to be at sea--at least at night. You could float from Portland to Boston in 12 hours, but you can't open the casino or the shops while you're sitting in port.

AR
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Old November 9th, 2002, 12:10 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

True, and the ship must also pay more port charges the longer they stay there.....
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Old November 9th, 2002, 05:17 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

I have to vote for being at sea is more profitable. We will see in the next few years. If they start adding more sea days and removing ports to make money because the fares can't go any lower, then you will have your answer.

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Old November 9th, 2002, 06:31 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

Personally I'm even amazed at the question. The ships rush to get out to sea to get the $$ flowing. The few dollars they make on an excursion sale can be made up with the sale of one drink or a couple of spins of a slot machine.

On any given itin in the Caribb., except for the jaunt back to Florida, you can see alot of the islands from any given island. In most cases they could stay a port of call until 3 AM and still be at the next island by 7AM.
Instead they take you out to sea and sail in circles. Why do you suppose this is? <VBG>

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Old November 10th, 2002, 06:51 AM
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Default Re: Re: Where is it more profitable?

True Kuki, I would agree.

I guess then, the NYC sailings to Bermuda, where the ships dock for a couple of days, are not as profitable.

Regards,
Thomas
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Old November 10th, 2002, 06:51 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

Guess that is why fares to Bermuda are usually exhorbitant. HIgher port charges and limited profit potential. Just how many tours around Bermuda can be sold when you're docked there for 3 days?
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Old November 11th, 2002, 12:35 AM
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Default Re: Re: Where is it more profitable?

Kuki,

Yup, get ya out to sea to take your money. While in port, no casino revenue as well. Our last mini-cruise they hi-tailed it out of Seattle to Canadian waters so it could open. The next night after Vancouver we circled around off Tsawwassen for a few hours on the way to Victoria. That was our "scenic cruising", seeing the lights of greater Vancouver all night! but no one was complaining, we were all having a great time and RCI was making money.

As for drinks, they pay very little for it with little or no taxes and duty. Way back in 1994 I was on an Icebreaker for a few days in the Arctic and a beer was $1CAN. At that time I think it was about $1.50 at the Liquor store. Profits went back to the crews canteen fund-yes there was profits. I believe the key word here (correct me if I'm wrong) is "International" sailing, as opposed to "Hometrade".

Question, are the casinos open on the Alaska runs or just in Canadian waters? Thanks.

richard
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Old November 12th, 2002, 01:33 PM
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Default Re: Where is it more profitable?

On my Inside Passage cruise in October, the only time I saw the the casino close was when we were in port. If I remember correctly, it was also closed for a few hours while in Glacier Bay, although I think that was more a "this is what you came to see and we're going to honor the beauty of the area with fewer distractions" move than a legal requirement.
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