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Old December 20th, 2002, 10:10 AM
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Default Unlock or lock luggage

Been reading a few articles on ths subject and quite frankly, I would be uncomfortable just leaving my luggage unlocked. I would not mind if they want to go through while I'm there, but to just leave it to who ever, just doesn't seem right?

Here is on article from CNN, what do you all think?

TSA: Unlock your baggage
'Living in a significantly heightened security environment'
Thursday, December 19, 2002 Posted: 10:24 PM EST (0324 GMT)



Passengers are being asked to use plastic ties for now, rather than locks on baggage. Soon, tamper-evident seals will be available.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Story Tools





CHECKED BAGGAGE PACKING TIPS

Don't put food or beverages in checked bags.

Don't stack books -- spread them out.

Put footwear on top of other items.

Leave gifts unwrapped.

Put personal items into clear plastic bags.

Don't put film into checked bags -- explosive-detection equipment may damage it.

Don't overpack.

Source: TSA





JACKSONVILLE, Florida (CNN) -- The Transportation Security Administration appealed Thursday to travelers not to lock their checked luggage.

As part of the TSA's new bag-screening policy, security agents will sometimes do hand searches of bags that trigger alarms without the owner being present.

"We have no choice but to open any bags that raise concern," Adm. James Loy, TSA undersecretary of transportation for security, told reporters at Jacksonville International Airport, one of the nation's first to install the screening equipment.

The request comes as the nation's commercial airports are working to meet a December 31 congressional deadline to do screening for explosives on all luggage checked at the nation's commercial airports.

The TSA is asking airline passengers to close their bags with the plastic ties typically used to ensure that garbage bags don't spill their contents.

Soon, travelers will be given free, tamper-evident seals with which to secure their bags, Loy said. "But, for now, I advise passengers to get their own."

Security agents will put a card inside each bag they have searched, indicating it has been opened and inspected, and the bag will then be resealed, he said.

Complaints of pilferage will be handled "on a case-by-case basis" by the airline, the TSA and the airport working together, he said.

In cases where suspect luggage is locked, "we'll open it," said TSA Spokesman Brian Turmail. If, in doing so, the bag is damaged, "we are not liable," he said.

Among tips Loy listed for helping passengers move more quickly through security, he pointed out that a list of prohibited items for carry-on bags -- including scissors, pocketknives and other sharp items -- is posted on the agency's Web site. These items can be put into checked bags.

Price tag: $2-2.5 billion
Legislation requiring that checked luggage be screened was passed in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks in which four commercial jets were hijacked and crashed into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania, killing about 3,000 people.

"The events of a year ago still echo hauntingly often in our minds," Loy said. "We are, in fact, living in a significantly heightened security environment."

He added, "If each of us does our part, we'll make travel safe and pleasant for everyone this holiday season."

Of the nation's 429 commercial airports, approximately 325 already have set up their baggage-screening programs, and the others will have a system working by the end of the year, Loy said.


Bruno, a bomb-sniffing dog checks luggage with his partner Gaylnn Sonius Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in Texas.



But a number of airports will not have automated systems in place by the deadline. They will be allowed to use equipment that detects traces of explosives, and to make use of dogs and hand searches to accomplish the task. "In all cases, all bags will be being checked," Loy said.

He declined to say which airports have yet to automate the search procedure. "Those are, I believe, steps in the direction of offering the bad guy information that I'm not going to be the one that ever tells them."

Loy estimated the cost of setting up the program nationwide at $2 billion to $2.5 billion.

CNN Correspondent Patty Davis and Miami Bureau Chief John Zarrella contributed to this story.

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Old December 20th, 2002, 10:57 AM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Well, I can tell you one thing...if my luggage is checked and something is missing, there will be hell to pay - what is to stop a screener from taking whatever they want - because by the time we discover that something is missing, we will already be in another city! Who are we supposed to talk to then? And will the people at the arriving airport even care? And what if you don't get your luggage until your ship is already out to sea...who helps you then? Is there going to be a time limit on when you can report an item or items missing? Too much chance for abuse of this situation. jmho



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Old December 20th, 2002, 11:36 AM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I read that same thing in an AP article in our morning paper. As for food, it specifies no cheese or chocolate. (or fruitcake--too dense for bomb detection)
To avoid damage to luggage in case of forced opening use cable or zip ties that can be cut off easily. But no idea how to prevent theft by handlers who cut ties ostensibly to check and have sticky fingers besides. I have had my baggage pawed through by hand when I changed my reservation (any changes are suspicious) but was able to relock bag afterward. I really don't want to leave it unlocked all the time. Next month when we leave for our cruise, I will lock it and unlock it only if i am directly ordered to. Maybe I'll ask for it to be checked in my presence and re-locked. This policy can only lead to more lawsuits and expense for the airline.
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Old December 20th, 2002, 12:36 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

i think i would still lock my bags, maybe switch to a wire type lock like the type used for bicycles. I am curious what happens if they find something "suspicious"?? do they board the plane and arrest the passenger on the spot?? what happens between now and the time they get the tamper evident seals? free reign on your bags???
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Old December 20th, 2002, 12:56 PM
AR
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Yes, I saw that story last night.

So here's the point: We've all known for months that they are going to start (have started) to put checked bags through the CAT scan machines. That's no secret.

Did anybody really believe that they would be doing that in our presence, especially with all the stories about space problems in existing airports and how most of the machines will have to be behind the scenes? Not to mention the additional delays that would be caused by such a scheme even if the machines could be out in the open?

With that knowledge, what were we expecting them to do when the machine pops up a red flag? Look at the tag for our name and call us on the PA system so we could be present for the search?

I mean, this is just the natural outcome of the information we've already had for months. I find it hard to believe that anybody's surprised.

We can argue all we want about individual rights vs. the commonweal, it's something I'm concerned about too, especially since the current problems aren't going to disappear in a year or two or three like they did in previous wars (when, theorectically, we reclaimed the rights that had been abrogated).

But I'm at a loss to see how anyone can be in favor in principle of screening checked bags and, as a practical matter, be against inspecting them outside our presence.

AR
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Old December 20th, 2002, 01:23 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I love this edit feature. Really didn't like what I wrote.

You've all given me something to think about. I probably will still not lock my luggage, but you have brought up some significant points about freedom and the folks who may be going through the luggage. I do think it's fair to be present if your luggage needs to be searched. I will also continue to take my more valuable things in my carry on.

Phyll



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Old December 20th, 2002, 04:39 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Donna,

I vote for (1) locking checked luggage anyway and (2) using the full power of the legal system to enforce one's constitutional rights -- including, in particular, the right against unlawful searches and seizures. The constitution requires every government agency to obtain a search warrant in order to search somebody's personal belongings without the person's consent -- and I refuse to consent to any inspection that I cannot observe. If TSA violates your constitutional rights, you do have a right to redress through the judicial system. Rights, if not enforced and defended, soon cease to exist.

Norm.
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Old December 20th, 2002, 04:51 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I'm going to leave my luggage unlocked on the way home. Reaching in then will certainly teach them a lesson <G>

Regards,
Kuki

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Old December 20th, 2002, 06:30 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Sorry, Norm, I can't go with you on this one.

When you book passage on a public carrier, you give over those rights.

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Old December 20th, 2002, 08:03 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Mike - I understand the part of it that relates to my rights to search and seizure...my fear is that this is just going to make it easier for dishonest people to steal from the luggage......when we turn over our luggage, we do not see it again until we arrive at our destination. At that point, what recourse do we have? Unless you photograph everything that goes into your luggage and photograph it again as you take it out, what proof do you have that something is missing? And setting up another bureaucracy (?sp) for passengers to complain to, just makes it that much harder for the passenger to get justice. Are those searching the luggage going to be secretly taped while they are doing it? I just feel there needs to be some protections for the passengers before this "tamper proof" stuff becomes available to the general public.

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Old December 20th, 2002, 09:18 PM
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Lisa:

Sorry, but it sounds very much like you want to have your cake and eat it too.

I'm sure you don't want to get blown to smithereens during your flight. But you also don't want your bags opened outside your presence if the machine questions something that's inside. It's quite clear that screening all checked luggage in the presence of the owners would hopelessly clog airports and actually make some of them unusable.

So what's it going to be? A lower level of security in which almost anything can be put aboard a plane in checked baggage (we all remember Lockerbie, don't we?), or the low possiblity that your bag will be pilfered during the inspection process?

If--as has been suggested for years--you don't pack money, jewelry, prescription drugs and other valuables in checked luggage anyway, the worst that can happen is that you lose some clothes, shoes, souvenirs.

I don't particularly like the prospect of having my bags opened either, but I don't see a practical alternative. Do you?

AR
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Old December 20th, 2002, 09:36 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

No, I don't want my cake and to eat it too. I understand and support the necessary security measures. But, I am also a realist and know that just because someone has a TSA badge on does not mean they are not going to be totally honest....what protection do we have against them? And maybe to you, losing some clothes or souveniers is "nothing" but to some people that can be devastating (try finding clothes in my size on a ship or in a port). I always carry my medication, valuable jewlery, etc in my carryon....but who is policing those enforcing the new security measures? That is my question......hell, go ahead and search, but be honest about it and if someone is accused of stealing, don't stonewall and force the injured party to jump through hoops to receive redress.

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Old December 20th, 2002, 10:54 PM
AR
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Well, OK, fine. You've outlined a problem which is at this point hypothetical. But you haven't articulated a solution. The closest you come to one is to imply that you want another layer of security people overseeing the TSA. Do you reckon there might be some serious cost issues associated with that? And who's to say the overseers wouldn't be just a crooked as the TSA screeners they're watching? Then you go on to assume that if something is taken, those doing the taking will be shielded by the bureaucracy. Maybe they will, but there's certainly no evidence to that effect.

The best we can do at this point is to say that the TSA people seem to be reasonably well trained and supervised, and have undergone some sort of background check. And, importantly, they're paid a decent wage for what they do. This is clearly a higher standard than we've had in the past. I've chatted up a number of TSA folks at airports around the country over the last few months, and there is a clear improvement in morale, attitude, attentiveness, and people skills over what we used to have.

For all I know the TSA might very well also install cameras at the machines to keep tabs on these folks. None of this will give you a gilt-edged guarantee, but what does these days?

If you have some ideas about how your bags can be better protected during this process, I'm sure the TSA would be glad to hear them. For the life of me, I can't think of a practical way to have the bags screened AND to have them hand inspected in front of you when necessary. Until somebody comes up with one, I think it's just going to be a matter of grinning and bearing it.

Or, of course, you can always stay away from airplanes like more and more people are doing.

AR

PS: I didn't say that losing your belongings is "nothing." I simply said that compared to some alternatives that are in play these days, it's the lesser of evils. Big difference.
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Old December 20th, 2002, 11:35 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

My .02:

Per many experienced flyers, Europe has been using this technology (actually, a better technology) for many decades now, and they WILL call you into the room to be present when your checked luggage is pulled for a hand-search.

Part of our problem is that the TSA does not want to have to do that, but they have declined liability for any missing items!

I don't know about the rest of you, but a single carry-on-sized bag used by a teen female with none of the proscribed items in it had contents with a replacement value of nearly $1000 on a recent trip!
The carry-on had an even higher value, since it included all her make-up and CDs too (!)
And that did NOT include the cost of the bags
Clothing, and shoes, and misc travel items can add up real fast....

S
PS
I WILL be locking my bags- just haven't decided which form yet...
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Old December 21st, 2002, 07:14 AM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

My advice is, "Lock 'em up!" Theoretically, they'll only open "suspicious" suitcases. If mine fall into that category, they're going to have to work to get them open. In fact, if mine fall into that category, there's something drastically wrong with the screening/detection process - but that's a whole different thread. I'm all for increased airport security, but I'm not about to make it any easier for unscrupulous employees to help themselves to my belongings. The flying public needs to adjust to certain necessary changes in security, but the airlines/government owe the public a certain standard of care.
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Old December 21st, 2002, 08:18 AM
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I agree with most all of your concerns. But as someone previously wrote, we can't really have out cake and eat it too. Right after 9/11 when security was first increased, a friend of mine was traveling on an airline (can't remember which one). She had just under $1,000 worth of jewelry stolen from her luggage by an airport employee. When confronting the airline, they said there's nothing that could be done about it. When asked why they couldn't just review the videotape and see who may have done it, they replied "We don't have videotapes."

While I'm sure they will have to start montioring the employees who check our luggage, it seems so much safer to carry-on your valuable like jewelry. Therefore it's always in your possession. I also realize that not everything will fit on your carry-on. But I'm guessing that if it's too large to fit in carryon, it's too large for an employee to hide in his/her pockets.

Ironically, at the airport on her return flight home, an newstation was there doing interviews with passengers about how they feel about the increased security and she was one of the people they interviewed. She just grinned and said that it's something we have to get used to. She didn't say anything of the theft. My friend has since made the decision that she will carry as much of valuables in her carry-on as possible.

We have to give a little to get a little. It's unfortunate that there are airport employees that will inevitably steal our items. I'm just happy that I can fly from MA to FL instead of having to make a 24 hour drive.
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Old December 21st, 2002, 08:34 AM
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I honestly don't see any real solution to this, hopefully they will use their best judegement as to which piece of luggage looks like a problem. For me, I think I will continue to lock mine and if worst comes to worst, I will have a broken lock and nothing missing, lets hope. I have no problem if they want to go through anything while I'm standing there, in fact my carry-on and purse was looked through at the Vancouver airport this last Sept., it was not big deal, they found absolutely nothing that was harmful or had to be taken away.

I just forsee some problems with this policy, hope we are worring about nothing, but time will tell???

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Old December 21st, 2002, 09:34 AM
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Please don't say "something drastically wrong with the screening system" when what you mean is "the best system we've been able to devise, which is still imperfect." They've already said that thick bundles of books will set it off, as will chunks of chocolate. Why? Who the hell knows? They just do. Does this mean there's something drastically wrong with it? I think people will only claim that until it detects the first real bomb. Then, suddenly, the system will be prasied to the skies.

My wife's knee replacements set off every security device she walks through. So what? She's got a note from her doctor. You cope. You adjust. Frequent fliers who do not wish to die young have learned over many years to go with the flow, and figure out the most efficient ways to work within the system, then use their experience to gain a subtle edge here and there. Holding your breath until you turn blue and other forms of defiance are not usually among the techniques they use. Nor is "daring" the authorities, either in person or on bulletin boards.

AR
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Old December 21st, 2002, 02:18 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

If they are going to search our luggage by hand WHY spend all those $$$$$$ on electronic machines?
I was all set to pack this morning for my cruise when I saw that I now have to leave my luggage unlocked! I am unhappy with this, there are many "lightfingered staff " at airports (My newpaper has carried stories over past weeks of staff at Florida airports with multiple convictions, false ID cards and fake "green cards", not just one or two people but over 100+ at one airport alone)

Many of my outfits are "one of a kind"made especially by me and cannot be replaced at the local mall no matter how much one may pay. I am 100% in favour of security, ( I have had first hand experience of Muslim extremists, I lived in a muslim country for over 2 years) but I am sick of being pushed around by our own power hungry civil servants,

Since I received my tickets I have had the the flight changed three times, the departure airport changed once (from one 30 miles away to one 140miles away) my suitcases were downsized, then the weight went from 70lbs to 50lbs, and now leave them un locked!!!!

I am a very frustrated cruiser.
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Old December 21st, 2002, 02:56 PM
AR
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

If it helps at all, as far as I know, the only people who will be LEGALLY opening your bags outside your presence are TSA employees. These are people who have passed serious background checks, are not illegals, and have received more training than most airport rent-a-cops.

The people you're referring to in Florida were not, I believe, TSA people.

Now let's be realistic: The fact that your bags can be opened by the TSA does not mean that they will no longer pass through the remainder of the baggage handling process that's been in place for years, which is where most of the problems have taken place. Lots of people have access to the bags from the time they disappear behind the flaps until you hopefully see them again on the carousel.

As far as your question about why they'll be searching by hand after spending all the money on machines, the answer's quite simple: They're only going to search the bags that are flagged by the machine, just like they only search you at the security checkpoint if you "beep" when you walk through the metal detector. If you think about it, you'll realize that if they searched every bag by hand the air traffic system would be brought to its knees. That's why the machines are going in--so that every bag DOESN'T have to be hand searched. But when the alarm goes off, surely you must agree that there's a need to investigate further.

AR
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Old December 21st, 2002, 04:29 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Why can't the employees simply be screened prior to work and likewise after work? Just like at the Federal Mints. They dress in a jumpsuit with no pockets and walk through a screening machine to go to work and afterwards they come out of work the same way.

I don't have anything in my luggage any sane person would want. You want to take a shirt, or socks, or underwear, or perhaps a cheap camera? Go ahead. Is it worth your job to steal such an item or two? My money, credit cards and other valuables go with me on the plane.

Regards,
Thomas
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Old December 21st, 2002, 04:50 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Now, Thomas, that is a great idea!

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Old December 21st, 2002, 05:50 PM
AR
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

That's actually a fair point, Thomas, and maybe it will happen. So's the TV monitoring idea.

Just so we recognize that the TSA is probably the least of our worries in the entire baggage handling process.

AR
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Old December 21st, 2002, 06:00 PM
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

No you don't Pam! They have a right to refuse you passage but they do not have any right to violate the US Constitution. As for me, I will continue to place cable ties on my luggage and it better not be cut off or removed when I pick it up ot you will see me calling for the nearest supervisor and we will both go through my luggage and make sure nothing is missing. If I discover that it was indeed searched without my presence I will contact an attorney. The only reason I place ties on my bags is so that I know immediately if anyone has tampered with them. There is a definate violation of unlawful search involved in them doing this. I have never given up my rights, nor consented to a search outside of my presence and never will. If they want to go through my bags, fine, call me and I will watch. If not, don't put it on the plane and allow me to get off as well. I do not trust these people, they are not law enforcement officers who have undergone background investagations and polygraphs etc and even then, it isn't legal. As a former police office I am very much inclined towards removing some of these foolish "probable cause" restrictions that have to be meet, but there is no reason for them to go through my belongings without me being allowed to witness it. Watch this space for lawsuits to unfold on this subject! <G>
Jim

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Old December 21st, 2002, 06:08 PM
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

PS to Thomas:

Don't know if you've seen the stories, but you should DESIST from packing a camera (cheap or otherwise) unless it doesn't have film in it. The new machines are virtually guaranteed to zap the film. Carry all film with you and ask for hand inspection. TSA will tell you once that it's not necessary, then when you insist politely they will comply. It has worked consistently this way the last three times I've been through TSA security in the last few weeks. This represents the first time in my memory that security folks seem to be on the same page day to day and place to place.

That in itself is a bright spot.

AR
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Old December 21st, 2002, 11:05 PM
AR
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Jim:

Just think of all the cruises you'd be able to take with the money you'll wasting on attorney's fees screwing around with this one!

Give it up. You're on the losing side.

Even Don Quixote himself wouldn't take this one on.

AR
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Old December 22nd, 2002, 11:52 AM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I think the best news is that these restrictions may put those holiday fruit cake companies out of business But maybe not the litigious fruitcakes.

I'm not going to argue case law for two reasons. First, I am not a lawyer. Second, there IS NO CASE LAW on this particular subject. Yet. But I am sure there are members of the shark patrol just waiting to take this on.

ILLEGAL search (leave the seizure part out of it) is the issue. Until it's tested, we won't know whether searching a passenger's bag is legal or not. But I think the TSA Act pretty well covers it as does the "fine print" that we all agree to when we purchase ariline tickets. It IS a contract, after all.

Airplanes are not our homes. Jim probably knows this better than anyone else. You need a search warrant establishing probable cause to toss a person's dwelling-place and, I believe, the warrant must be specific about what's being searched for.

I stand to be corrected on that.

So, spinning out the hypothetical, say AR decides to take three fruitcakes in his checked luggage to the relatives he dislikes the most for a semi-festive holiday gathering. The scanner finds the fruitcakes and, to the scanner, they look suspicious by the parameters laid out for security. This is "probable cause." My opinion.

We have a friend who is always closely examined when she flies. Why? Her married name is third-world and she looks as Irish as Irish can be. That raises a flag.

I am always closely examined when I fly in or out of Heathrow because most of my name matches that of a pretty heavy-hitting IRA terroist woman who is still on the loose.

Do I enjoy the process? No. Do I think they are doing the right thing? Yes. I have never questioned the "right" -- or make that "responsibility" -- of a common carrier to search me or my belongings. It's my name that raises the flag.

Could be that we are all borrowing trouble here.

The TSA has come down with some reasonable suggestions that one's checked baggage NOT set off some alarm.

Leave those fruitcakes at home !!!

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Old December 22nd, 2002, 12:38 PM
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Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage


Pamda wrote;
ILLEGAL search (leave the seizure part out of it) is the issue. Until it's tested, we won't know whether searching a passenger's bag is legal or not. But I think the TSA Act pretty well covers it as does the "fine print" that we all agree to when we purchase ariline tickets. It IS a contract, after all.

Airplanes are not our homes. Jim probably knows this better than anyone else. You need a search warrant establishing probable cause to toss a person's dwelling-place and, I believe, the warrant must be specific about what's being searched for.

I stand to be corrected on that.

Hey Pam,
It is not necessary for it to be your home or person, here is what it says in the Fourth Amendment;
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, PAPERS and EFFECTS, (emphasis mine) , against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall be issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
As you can see, the papers and effects part clearly applies to your luggage. In fact there was a case, (don't ask as I can't remember offhand), where luggage WAS searched from a vehicle after the subject was arrested and the contents which were highly illegal and incriminating were found but tossed out as being illegally searched and siezed. The Carroll Act, which is why police are often allowed to search vehicles without a warrant, does not apply to the luggage being shipped or traveling with a person outside their immediate possession.
Please don't anyone misunderstand that I do not support fighting terrorists or making it very difficult to combat them, quite the opposite. I just do not think this is a good idea at all and subject to abuse and that it will not hold up in a cort of law. As another pointed out, they passed a law that says these TSA people can do this, (I would really like to see the part that specifically says they can search travelers luggage or other articles without a warrant or permission), they cannot just pass a law saying one can ignore the US Constitution. It will be challanged and I predict the challange will be successful in the Supreme Court.
My main concern is that you are allowing people to rummage through your personal belongings not only without your consent, but in private without your presence! I, nor otheres would want Police Officers to have that power, (heck, they have made sure that power is not possessed by them), much less some glorified security guard. Sorry if it offends people but the fact is that a number of these TSA people are foreign nationals and what kind of serious background check are they going to be subjected to? I have also seen a number of these TSA people around airports and many appear to be less than someone I would trust all that far. I am sure that there are a very large number that are wonderful people, but way too many are not from what I have seen. It is just an unnecessary violation of my person as far as I am concerned. I seriously doubt if I would be the "test" case but someone certainly will very soon and they will make some money off it not to mention the millions some attorney will make. Guess who will pay for that? Taxpayers like you and I and I would much rather see it applied to a useful purpose than in the pockets of some attorney. I see no problem with notifying the passenger to come to the baggage handling area and withness a search if they feel it necessary. If the person doesn't show up, then simply the baggage is not placed on the plane and when this person boards they are denied passage. There also in not 'fine print' on any of my tickets that says I agree to having my bags searched outside my presence. I don't like having my carry-ons searched but at least it is understandable and in my presence and I do watch them and have on one occasion told them not to touch my bag until I was finished being personally searched so that I could watch them enter my carry-on. They complied with that demand.
Jim

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Old December 22nd, 2002, 02:09 PM
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Default Re: Unlock or lock luggage

Jim ..

I think it's all about ONE WORD and that's going to leave it up to the Supremes decide.

UNREASONABLE.

It would be interesting to see if there could be an expedited case before the Supremes. But even that could take months.

Let's not argue, here. I don't like the idea any more than you do.

Arguably, this could drive the airline industry into the ground and isn't that what the terrorists are all about? Destroying infrastucture?



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Old December 22nd, 2002, 03:17 PM
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Default Re: Re: Unlock or lock luggage

I agree that it will be up to the US Supreme Court before it is all over but have to believe that they will find it in violation of the Fourth Amendment if history is any indication. Like you, I don't like it and I will still secure my bags with cableties and if they are tampered with I will have a supervisor called and my bags examined for any theft. I will also lodge a formal complaint weither it does any good or not. I don't pack anything valuable in my checked luggage is at all possible because I know all too well the large amount of theft that goes on already. The only reason I use the ties is so that I know when someone has been in the bags. So far they have not been bothered but I have to believe it is only because other bags are too easy so why bother with a bag someone will notice has been entered. I cannot see where it is unreasonable to inform the owner of any suspect luggage/package and have them present when the bag is checked and that is my main objection. I also do not want my bags to be a free shopping mall for untrustworthy baggage handlers. We shall see what happens, but I still think it is wrong and will secure my bags.
Jim

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