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Toni1313 September 10th, 2007 09:53 PM

911.. How have you changed?
 
How does it affect you, if it still does.. [/b][/list]

mehawk September 10th, 2007 11:22 PM

I am paranoid when I see a suspicious person around me. But then, being in law enforcement, I always am. Just a little bit more now.

DougR. September 11th, 2007 06:30 AM

I was there.....three blocks away......27 floors up with a picture window view of the towers.

It is a day that is permanently burned into my memory. Six years later it is still like yesterday. I hope it remains that way, becuase to forget is to deny.

I want to remember the horrible sight of people jumping off the tower becuase it was the easier way to die, in particular a man and woman who jumped holding on to each other. I want to remember watching helplessly as the second plane hit. I want to remember the fear, the uncertainty and the rumors. I want to remember the faces of those who I was acquainted with from my commute who never came home that day. I want to remember the relief and tears when I finally got home to Marj.

Yes, to remember is painful. But to forget is to be lulled into a sense of complacency, which will lead to worse in the future.

God bless America and the families of those who never got home that night.

mehawk September 11th, 2007 07:49 AM

My gosh, Doug, how terrible that must have been to see. I watched it happening on television as the first one was hit then the second one live.

Unfortunately, my good friend, too many... I repeat... TOO MANY people have forgotten or deny that this happened to our great country. They should be considered enemies in my book as well. How DARE they forget or deny this. Our country is killing itself with its being too "nice" to others who are our enemies. We need and must have leadership who WILL stand up against those who cross us, whether overseas or in our own backyards, whether foreigners, or American citizens who want to bury their heads in the dirt, those who will make decisions that will protect us and not give a rat's nest about what others say. A lot of our own citizens and political leaders need a swift kick to remind them that we are the injured ones here and we need to stand up for ourselves and kick back.

OOffa! :x :x

venice September 11th, 2007 07:55 AM

it's the December 7th, 1941 of our time and I am surprised there are not more comparisions made to how our country dealt with the aftermath in terms of civil liberties

fourxbusymom September 11th, 2007 10:53 AM

I also watched the reporting, with my three young children (4,3 & 18 months at the time). I was horrified when the second one hit.

We had just moved into our house, and we are only about 5 miles from the Navy's east coast Master Jet Base. So, the scariest part was how silent it was. The only thing flying was a group of 5 helicopters that went over the house at a very low altitude towards the ocean - like were chasing something. Plus, my husband was on a base in CA, and I couldn't reach him.

I know what you mean about the relief you felt when you finally got home. It took hubby til Friday to find a flight that would get him as far as Pittsburgh. Then he had to rent a car and drive the other 9 hours home. I have never been so relieved to see him - even after 6-month deployments.

rescuedad September 11th, 2007 11:30 AM

How has anybody changed??? other than becoming a person who is more dedicated to our country, stands behind our government good or bad and being a person who is willing to defend the United States till their dying breath no change should have occurred.

Nothin but blue skies September 11th, 2007 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mehawk
My gosh, Doug, how terrible that must have been to see. I watched it happening on television as the first one was hit then the second one live.

Unfortunately, my good friend, too many... I repeat... TOO MANY people have forgotten or deny that this happened to our great country. They should be considered enemies in my book as well. How DARE they forget or deny this. Our country is killing itself with its being too "nice" to others who are our enemies. We need and must have leadership who WILL stand up against those who cross us, whether overseas or in our own backyards, whether foreigners, or American citizens who want to bury their heads in the dirt, those who will make decisions that will protect us and not give a rat's nest about what others say. A lot of our own citizens and political leaders need a swift kick to remind them that we are the injured ones here and we need to stand up for ourselves and kick back.

OOffa! :x :x


AMEN!!!

You are absolutely right. As I watched the news coverage this morning and watched President Bush make his statement that morning about going after these terrorists, and I watched those poor people running for their lives in the streets of New York on 9/11/01, I wondered just how many of them, and just how many of the people who lost loved ones on that day are now "Bush Bashers" and saying "bring home the troops, we never should have sent them?" What if our President had just said how sorry he was for this loss of life, but that he really could not in good conscience send our troops to fight for our country? Where would we be today? Yes, we have lost a lot of young men to this war, but those men are where they want to be, fighting for our freedom. These are not drafted men (as many were in Viet Nam) they are volunteers who are trained for this honored duty to their country. If our President cannot utilize our military forces to defend our country, then why do we need a military force at all. Let's just lay down and become the weakest instead of the greatest nation in the world and let them kill us and our children and grandchildren.

ready2board September 11th, 2007 12:32 PM

I posted a bit about this in another thread.

The airlines now are on this kick about no lotions, gels, shampoos or basically liquids being allowed in the carry ons.

However, when I asked the airline about carrying on some large martini glasses obtained on our cruise they just shrugged and said "no problem".

All one would have to do is take one of these glasses out of his carry on, break the glass and have a brutal edged weapon as deadly, if not more so, than the ones used on 9/11. As I said in the other post, glass if fine in the carry on but no head and shoulder shampoo lol..Still trying to figure that out.

rayb September 11th, 2007 02:14 PM

d
 
Helen and I were in Chihauhau, Mexico on this date 6 years ago. We remember it well.
http://www.cruisemates.com/gallery2/...s/583/5466.jpg

Kuki September 11th, 2007 03:32 PM

I've changed because the world changed that day.

However, it sadly seems that the world doesn't have a good memory. The world no longer remembers very well the evils of World War II and the holocaust, or the bombing of the US troop barracks, or the attack on the Cole. And now, though we stop and remember today.... that memory, and the emotions the world felt that day are sadly slowly fading.

I'm very much with Doug. We NEED to remember, and remember the resolve the world felt that day!! Without that resolve we're still in great danger of seeing it all happen again.

Luanne Russo September 11th, 2007 05:19 PM

I was in a classroom with special needs children that day. My co-teacher's father was in the Pentagon. We took turns going to the school library to watch TV, and her trying to get her dad on the phone. (The plane went over his desk, but he had taken his staff to another part of the building for a meeting, all survived) Because we we near a major Army base, we were warned about attacks in our area too.

We were told to plan to spend what ever time it took to get the kids connected to their parents, even if it took all night. Jim was on duty, so I had to find my kids by phone, and get them to lock themselves in the house until I could get to them.

Jim has spent three long tours looking for these *** holes, and many short ones.

I agree with Doug. We must not ever forget what happened.

AR September 11th, 2007 05:41 PM

Well, I've been flamed before, so I might as well get flamed again . . .

To begin with, my bona fides regarding 911 are as credible as anyone else's: We live ten minutes from the Pentagon. I have a wife who was in an office building two short blocks from the White House that morning (which, as you'll recall, is where some thought the Pennsyvania plane was headed); I have a son who is (and was then) an airline pilot based in New York; and I have another son who was on his way to work in lower Manhattan that morning. It is not likely that I will forget the terror I felt until I knew that all of them were safe; and it's not likely that I will forget how I felt afterward. And my pilot son will never forget how he felt when the possibility presented itself that--in a previous job--he might have been a flight instructor for one of the terrorists, even though it would have been completely unwitting, of course. After long discussions with law enforcement, he was relieved to find out that it was not the case.

As much as anyone else here, I would like to see those responsible tracked down and punished. Who in his right mind wouldn't?

So, let's look at this string in reverse order, starting with Kuki. Yes, we do need to remember the resolve the world felt that day. Absolutely we do. We resolved to bring those who did this awful thing to justice. And then we invaded a country that had nothing to do with 9/11, poured the lion's share of our resources in there at the expense of going after the perpetrators. And some people drank the government Kool-Aid that said they were related, but we know very well that they weren't. And there's something else we need to remember about that day: we need to remember the support and sympathy we had from across the globe. But we quickly squandered that.

Nothin but blue skies and Mike decry "Bush bashers" and say we're too nice to our enemies, that we're the injured party and we need to stand up for ourselves. Mike, as a cop you must have read stories about fellow cops who go out to serve a warrant, wind up at the wrong house, and beat the door down. They always lose those lawsuits, because there's no excuse for not getting the facts straight. Well, that's exactly what we've done. We went to the wrong address, and fought the wrong war. There wasn't a single Iraqi on those planes, nor anyone who trained in Iraq, nor anyone who even cared about Iraq. We beat down the wrong door, and now we're paying a dear price. Meanwhile, the real perpetrator makes videos, trains more terrorists, and spreads cells into--ironically--the place we did attack. And we sit around and muse over how he's dyed his beard.

rescuedad says he stands behind our government good or bad. I do not. I stand behind our country good or bad, but not necessarily the government. They are very different things. The country is We the People. The founders said so. You can look it up, if there are any unshredded copies of the Constitution left. The government, as Mark Twain said, is "our servant. . .and a temporary one." To say that if you don't support the government you're somehow un-American is the ultimate false choice. Any government that we're willing to stand behind whether it's good or bad is not a government of a free land.

And we are the land of the free, and we must always remember that dissent is not disloyalty. Time and again dissent has been proven the mark of a truly free people.

As to the original question, many people who discover that we travel an awful lot ask if we're not afraid. No we are not afraid. We will not walk this life in fear. We believe we are prudent; we try to be sensible and act sensibly both at home and abroad.

I do not have a "to hell with the rest of the world" attitude that is so prevalent now among so many in the US. Quite the contrary, I somehow feel much more humble. I smile more at people from abroad, and I try harder to learn more about other cultures. Somehow, I think it is more important than ever.

Call me a fool. I know you will.

ready2board September 11th, 2007 06:16 PM

AR:

Good post. I may not agree 100 pct but then again, I don't agree with anybody or anything 100 pct of the time.

As far as Iraq, I simply feel that no matter how rough it has been and no matter what our original reaons for going in were, the world will be better off with some type of free society in that region in years to come. I'm not really sure what Bush and the rest of the free world were supposed to do..Saddam defied the UN over and over again. He slaughtered thousands through gassing and torture. I've got this strange feeling that the WMD's probably did exist but went "bye bye" to Syria or someplace else (the nerve gas that he used to gas thousands IS a WMD by the way even though the media seems to gloss over that little factoid). Alot of us talk about short term memories, especially today, so it somtimes surpries me that most forget about the hit team that Saddam sent over to take care of George Bush SR....Pretty sure that was an act of war itself. What were we to do?...Let Saddam stand and in the fairly near future, when he passed, let one of his homicidal, lunatic sons take over?

As gruesome as they are, everyone should watch one of the beheadings on the internet....That is why we fight. Watch those videos, which are from Iraq, and tell me that there isn't a threat there and that there isn't an element there that needs to be eliminated.

Luanne, regards to your hubby especially for all he has done. I hate to say it and I know it sounds "gloom and doom" but I think what we have been through with 9/11, Iraq and this whole mess is fairly mild compared to what we will be facing in the future.

Six years ago today, it was all flag waiving and "go get em" . I think part of the problem is that this doesn't feel like a war to most people...In reality, with the exception of Luanne and the other military folks, how many of us have had to really sacrifice over this cause ? Besides more inconvenience at the airport on our way to a week of stuffing our faces on a cruise ship, what has the average American really had to give up as we have in past wars? Most people showed how patriotic they were six years ago by sticking a flag decal on their back windshield and that has been about the extent of it for most. It was "trendy" to be patriotic back then and there is one reason people did it...They were scared to death cause the boogy man came on 9/11. We've been extremely fortunate not to have been hit like that again so the fear and the patriotism wore off in unison with each other.

Luanne Russo September 11th, 2007 06:19 PM

:shock:

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 06:36 PM

I wanted to be on line so bad today, but i had jury duty

here are some photos that i took and a friend took..

http://share.shutterfly.com/action/w...r&linkid=link2

I hate 9-11..
My brother, a Long Island Fireman went downtown that evening and spent the next several weeks there.. searching..A year and half later, my 35yr old brother died after being in the hospital for 4months with a pulmonary illness, ARDS>> Acute Respiratory Distress...

Kuki September 11th, 2007 07:03 PM

AR..

Sorry to see you chose to make this thread political, laying blame.

Frankly, I think it has little to do with it. If all of those troops were still in Afhganistan instead of Iraq I fear the resolve of the people, and the US and the world would still be waning. It's difficult because for many it only seems to last as long as the emotion and the adrenalin.

Facts can generally only be discerned by history, and even then they are only interpretted. Look back at WW II, and what was viewed as America's late entrance into that battle. The U.S. wanted proof that what was happening "over there" was a threat to them. Sadly it came.

Terrorism wan't born with Bin Laden. There were plenty of incidents of the growth of militant jihadists before 9-11. They went without much, if any, response, and the movement continued to grow.

AR September 11th, 2007 07:07 PM

ready2--

I have no real problem with your brief against Iraq, but my point is simply that if you want to try to make that case as a reason for going to war, then make it straight up. Obviously, there were chemical weapons in Iraq at some point. Everybody knows that. But it's also true that Mr. Blix and Mr. ElBaradi are undoubtedly two of the most wronged men of the early 21st century. I still cringe when I remember how our representatives--including Colin Powell--mocked them and derided them, when all they were was. . .right. It was the classic case of "don't bother me with the facts, I know what I believe."

And, sure, it's true that Iraq overall turns our understanding of humanity on it's ear. No doubt about it. We don't understand it (which is a big part of our problem now), and our instincts go thoroughly against it.

You say that's why we fight. Well, the problem is that there have been a million different reasons given for why we fight this particular war. The reasons keep changing for the sake of expediency, and frankly, the people have caught on.

I'm sure you and I could have a tremendous talk about justifications for fighting for specific reasons. But we'd probably also agree that it gets a little crazy when the reason changes at the blink of an eye--or a press release. And at the end of the day, when we ask "What does all this have to do with 9/11?," the answer is not a hell of a lot.

Luanne--

I couldn't disagree with most of what you say more thoroughly. But please let no one interpret that disagreement as a lack of support for those sent to fight. It's a common canard to accuse those who dissent of not supporting the fighters, but as I've said here before, it seems that perhaps the only thing we've learned from Vietnam is to separate the fight from the fighters.

I do not feel that I am "uninformed" about the mission in Iraq. In fact, I can recite all the different "missions" that we've claimed to have had there since we went in. If we're talking about 9/11 here, I am of the belief that the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. And the shortest distance to those who destroyed the towers, who damaged the Pentagon, and who crashed in Pennsylvania is not through Iraq.

I do not believe that all those we put in power in government are very smart. I've met some of them. They pull their pants on one leg at a time just like the rest of us--except for those who can't even figure out how to do that.

As to fairweather friends, I have another take on that. Have you ever noticed that sometimes it takes a really good friend to tell you when you're wrong?

Best regards as always.

venice September 11th, 2007 07:16 PM

If any of us know people that were alive for the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, I wonder what their recollections are of that day and how it impacted their lives ..I have very good friends in the Bay Area whose parents were in Oakland at the time (who were Americans but were born in Japan), who were forced to relocate to "camps" in Idaho and lost everything (actually taken away from them by the US government) and the irony was one of their sons was on active duty in the army at the time ..I have friends in New Orleans but are of Middle Eastern descent, and their lives and business were threaten right after 911 for no other reason then their last name and religion..just because of their last name and the fact that they travel to see their family puts them on the TSA "watch list"

my answer to the original post is that today always makes me think about the above two examples and how it has changed me is that I don't pre judge a person because of their religion or the spelling of their last name...but I have a son who has been to Iraq for 2 short tours and is subject to go again on short notice and I worry about him and about our mission...Vietnam is still very fresh in my mind and how when the political will of our country changed, we got out

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luanne Russo
I won't be calling you a fool, because much of what you said, makes a lot of sense.

What I will call you is uninformed about the mission in Iraq. We knew there were no Iraqis in the planes. But what we already knew was that Saddam was a huge threat to the region, and was slowly taking out his own people, or at least those who did not do as he said, and he had plans to take the rest of the area as well.

We also knew that we were not going to find a sign that said "Welcome to the home of all terrorist," so we had to get into position, so that we could have a permanent staging area.

My husband has not fought an Iraqi since the gulf war. What he has been up against are the terrorists who have come out of the wood work, and in many cases over the borders to fight.

Those that we put into power in our government are very smart, and for the most part have all of us in mind, when they go about their business, but unfortunately, some would rather make the other side look bad, when things are going as planned, rather than stand behind them in their efforts.

What you have to ask yourself is Do I want the soldiers to fight them here in the states, or continue to do so over there?

I like your quote about squandering good will. I was always taught that those were fair weather friends, and for the most part, you could do without them, because when the going got rough, they would not be there to help.

I would rather have a few trust worthy countries standing with us, than a bunch, that we have to constantly watch to see if they are going for the next good thing.


Clinton signed the Iraq Liberation Act in either 98 or 99 but didnt bother to follow thru.. While i am not a huge fan GWB, he followed the law
18 Resolutions... how many lines in the sand do we draw?

If not there, than here..

I agree with you Luanne..unfortunately the majority of the country has ADD and wants instant gratification...
I didnt mean for this thread to become political.. I wanted it more to be a remembrance...

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mehawk
I am paranoid when I see a suspicious person around me. But then, being in law enforcement, I always am. Just a little bit more now.

Me too
I was at the WTC two weeks before.. I, like many others, always had a gut feeling they would be back to finish it.. We cruised out of NYC begining the 2nd week Sept.. I said to my dad as we passed the towers.. one day.. one day.. He told me I was paranoid..
Two days later was 9-11,,
My sister and her husband were on a Princess Cruise to Bermuda.. They were worried about me, because i had another appointment at Port Authority and was complaining about going there again.. Luckily i woke up late..

My brother a long island fireman...went down that evening and worked down there for a few weeks.. Year and half later he died of a respiratory disease.. 35 yrs old!

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DougR.
I was there.....three blocks away......27 floors up with a picture window view of the towers.

It is a day that is permanently burned into my memory. Six years later it is still like yesterday. I hope it remains that way, becuase to forget is to deny.

I want to remember the horrible sight of people jumping off the tower becuase it was the easier way to die, in particular a man and woman who jumped holding on to each other. I want to remember watching helplessly as the second plane hit. I want to remember the fear, the uncertainty and the rumors. I want to remember the faces of those who I was acquainted with from my commute who never came home that day. I want to remember the relief and tears when I finally got home to Marj.

Yes, to remember is painful. But to forget is to be lulled into a sense of complacency, which will lead to worse in the future.

God bless America and the families of those who never got home that night.

So eloquent! Thank you

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kuki
AR..

Sorry to see you chose to make this thread political, laying blame.

Frankly, I think it has little to do with it. If all of those troops were still in Afhganistan instead of Iraq I fear the resolve of the people, and the US and the world would still be waning. It's difficult because for many it only seems to last as long as the emotion and the adrenalin.

Facts can generally only be discerned by history, and even then they are only interpretted. Look back at WW II, and what was viewed as America's late entrance into that battle. The U.S. wanted proof that what was happening "over there" was a threat to them. Sadly it came.

Terrorism wan't born with Bin Laden. There were plenty of incidents of the growth of militant jihadists before 9-11. They went without much, if any, response, and the movement continued to grow.

I recommend a book entitled, "1000 years for Revenge"
Great factual reading.. Goes way back...how we missed alot of the signs.. also ties in Flight 800 which i will never ever believe was a malfunction.. Sorry i know too many of the people who witnessed a missle or something shooting up that night.. I live on LI and i have been to the memorial.. Heartbreaking...

Toni1313 September 11th, 2007 08:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ready2board
I posted a bit about this in another thread.

The airlines now are on this kick about no lotions, gels, shampoos or basically liquids being allowed in the carry ons.

However, when I asked the airline about carrying on some large martini glasses obtained on our cruise they just shrugged and said "no problem".

All one would have to do is take one of these glasses out of his carry on, break the glass and have a brutal edged weapon as deadly, if not more so, than the ones used on 9/11. As I said in the other post, glass if fine in the carry on but no head and shoulder shampoo lol..Still trying to figure that out.

I think they are more worried about what the liquid may be.. Just a guess

mehawk September 11th, 2007 08:49 PM

AR, my good friend, where in the previous posts before yours, did someone bring up the country of Iraq? The posting was about this country and the aftereffects of September 11, 2001.

I'll say this about Iraq. I didn't agree with the invasion that the US did there and I always knew it was about something else. Humor me here for a moment... Recall if you will, Saddam Hussein was intimately responsible for the attempted ASSASINATION of United States President George H. W. Bush. In my feeble thoughts, that, alone, is reason enough to go after him and make him pay for that. I know our country has "allegedly" financed assasinations on other foreign leaders. Surely, you didn't turn a blind eye to the attempt on Bush 41? I believe that was Bush 43's ultimate reson to attack Hussein. Bush 43 got Hussein out of power and Iraq made the move to try him and kill him, not the USA!



I want us out of there now but, when the country can be assured of not being a safe haven for those who wish to cause harm to our REPUBLIC!

I'm not going to turn this into a personal posting and I am surprised that you did. You are better than that.

My thoughts were, again, about those who witnessed the terror of the day, witness and experience the terror of today, and about my disgust with those who think the USA "deserved" what happened on September 11, 2001 and deserve all that happens afterwards. Being in government, I KNOW that when authority is removed from an area of crime, the criminals converge upon that area and exploit its "safety". That is what will happen if the areas of terror are left unsecured and the criminals will follow us here to home again.

Secure the borders, expell those who are here illegally they are easy to find if you open your eyes to look, open your own eyes to the damage done to this great country and her CITIZENS, get tougher on our enemies to show we mean business about our own security, become the superpower that we used to be once again. Look at Russia, they are flexing their own muscles now.

Get off of the Iraq crap and focus on the USA. :!: :!: :arrow: :x :x

:x :x :x :x

mehawk September 11th, 2007 08:51 PM

AR, also, please do not call me out again unless you have walked in my shoes as I shall not do the same to you my friend. :wink:

jimh49 September 11th, 2007 11:11 PM

I am a Canadian and a veteran who still works with the Cdn Army. Becasue of 9/11 our forces are shoulder-to-shoulder with our American friends in Afganistan. Many Canadians also died on 9/11. I cannot comment on the Iraq fight because we are not involved. However, I was so impressed with the American resolve immediately after 9/11 and I only hope it continues - any weakness will be costly!

Back to cruising, I am retiring in two months (Yes!) and looking forward to 4 B2B cruises on the Carnival Glory. Cheers.....Jim

rescuedad September 12th, 2007 12:09 AM

AR wrote:

Quote:

rescuedad says he stands behind our government good or bad. I do not. I stand behind our country good or bad, but not necessarily the government. They are very different things. The country is We the People. The founders said so. You can look it up, if there are any unshredded copies of the Constitution left. The government, as Mark Twain said, is "our servant. . .and a temporary one." To say that if you don't support the government you're somehow un-American is the ultimate false choice. Any government that we're willing to stand behind whether it's good or bad is not a government of a free land.
AR I am always impressed with the intelligence of your posts but I believe, in your response, we are interpreting the same thing differently. We, as a people, vote for the leaders of our government. We set up what is supposed to be a fair voting system. The people voted in our current heads of government. Good or bad, the people, in times of crisis, should stand behind that elected government so as to present a united front! Don't you think our enemies are joyous over the division of our country they see on the news? It doesn't help when half our country agrees with the enemy! Say it with votes in the next election. If he is right or wrong I always stand behind and defend my brother. Then when we are both cleaning off the blood I would let him know what I think. In regards to Iraq I can't see how any ordinary citizen can say whether this was justified or not. Unless you have all the intelligence that the administration receives how could you possibly come to a decision? We get our information from right and left wing media, we get what is leaked from heads of government through this biased media. How can you determine what is true or untrue? who does or doesn't have a hidden agenda? As far as WMD possesed by Iraq we can only guess the administration acted on the best information they had. It is sad to think of the soldier who knows that half the country doesn't stand behind his efforts. How hard is he going to fight? Half the country doesn't believe what he is fighting for is worth getting killed over. How does that soldier fight with all his heart? I'll tell you how. He stands by the decision of his leaders as we all should be, good or bad. Someone said in another post about instant gratification. Well I am sure, the day after 9/11 the whole country would have cheered a complete obliteration of every country who is considered an enemy. We were angry and wanted revenge on anyone who is against the American way. Well, over the past 6 years everyone has gone back to their normal lives, they forget that initial thought and want to gripe about what is happening and help divide the country. Everd day of the year their should be signs posted with a picture of the towers crumbling with the caption
"remember this? That's why" in regards to us being at war. Having said all this I still enjoy your posts.

Cruznut2 September 12th, 2007 03:18 AM

Gorgeous early fall day in NH, sunny and warm with a hint of the foliage to come. I had taken a client in for an exercise class and was on my way to meet her resource coordinator. On the way I heard it on the radio. I met up with the RC, I told her what was happening. I remember looking at the sky and thinking how could something so horrible be happening and the day stay so beautiful. After our appointment I took the client to our home for coffee. I watched the news until lunch time. We were supposed to meet a friend for lunch at a local restaurant. We got there we went in and waited. Our friend never showed up. She was on the phone all day with her husband in Washington DC. He worked across from the Pentagon and was describing everything to her. Finishing the work day was hard. We made it through that horrible day. I will never forget it.

Laura

venice September 12th, 2007 05:40 AM

the day is over..let us move forward


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