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Old October 7th, 2010, 03:28 PM
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Thumbs up Year round school!!

I just found out that starting next year my son's school will be switching to year round. It's not really year round they will have 8 weeks off in the summer, 3 weeks off during the winter hoilday, 2 weeks off during spring break, and then 2 weeks off in the fall. I'm sooo happy about this. More vacation options for us now!!:-D My hubby asked " vacation is that all you think about?" YES!!!
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Old October 7th, 2010, 04:00 PM
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Both of my daughters are school teachers .Neither would appreciate a 12 month school year .
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Old October 7th, 2010, 05:34 PM
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It's not a 12 month year. I'm not sure why they call it year round. He will be off the end of June all of July and the first week of August. The last week of September the first week of October, 3 week for Christmas break and 2 weeks for spring break. It breaks down to the same amout of school days.
I don't think anyone would want 12 months of school.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 07:28 PM
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Aerogirl,

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Originally Posted by You View Post
I just found out that starting next year my son's school will be switching to year round. It's not really year round they will have 8 weeks off in the summer, 3 weeks off during the winter hoilday, 2 weeks off during spring break, and then 2 weeks off in the fall. I'm sooo happy about this. More vacation options for us now!!:-D My hubby asked " vacation is that all you think about?" YES!!!
About a decade ago, I was rather surprised to find a large number of school-age children on a "Mexican Riviera" cruise out of Los Angeles in the October-November time frame. Some folks on the ship told me that their school districts in southern California had gone to a "three in one" school concept. They split the students and teachers into three groups and the calendar year into four academic terms of about twelve weeks, with a week off between terms and an extra week off at the interterm break over the Christmas and New Year's holidays. Each group was in school for two terms and then had a term off, but staggered so one group would always be on vacation. The group of students and teachers returning from vacation got the classrooms vacated by the group going on vacation, allowing the group continuing in class from the previous term to retain its classrooms, so the following rotation repeated every six terms.

Term - Side 1 & Side 2
1 - Group A & Group B (Group C off)
2 - Group C & Group B (Group A off)
3 - Group C & Group A (Group B off)
4 - Group B & Group A (Group C off)
5 - Group B & Group C (Group A off)
6 - Group A & Group C (Group B off)

This arrangement allowed each school to serve 50% more students with the same classroom space.

Note that each group of students retained the same group of teachers. They also assigned siblings would be in the same group so families could take vacations together during their vacation terms.

Norm.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 08:08 PM
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That is the nice thing about year around school, more flexible with vaction time. I think more districts are turning to that schedule.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 08:14 PM
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I don't know many schools that can afford air conditioning.
That's the main reason for the long summer break.
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Old October 7th, 2010, 08:28 PM
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I do remember our schools didn't have air conditioning and towards the end of the year, it got mighty hot in there, couldn't imagine having to go to school with no air...
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Old October 7th, 2010, 09:00 PM
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Were lucky enough to have central air in our school. What I do like about the "year round" is that the students retain what they where taught. With all summer off teachers spend to much time reteaching what the kids lost.
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Old October 11th, 2010, 05:31 PM
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Donna,

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That is the nice thing about year around school, more flexible with vaction time. I think more districts are turning to that schedule.
Where they have gone to the split school model that I described above, there's really no more or less flexibility. When it's your term off, it's your term off -- end of discussion. The school buildings have 100% utilization all year.

Norm.
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Old October 11th, 2010, 05:35 PM
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Captain Tennille,

Quote:
Originally Posted by ;1321712
I don't know many schools that can afford air conditioning.
That's the main reason for the long summer break.
Actually, usually costs to install air conditioning in an existing building than to add a new wing with 50% more classrooms.

Norm.
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Old October 11th, 2010, 05:59 PM
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For people who hope to plan a more quiet cruise, with fewer kids, it will be harder now..
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Old October 12th, 2010, 10:51 PM
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I sever yon edyslexic today?
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Old October 12th, 2010, 11:03 PM
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eye willl fixe that!
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Old October 13th, 2010, 11:00 AM
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Our school is not going to be a multi track school but a track E schedule. This means during the week’s when the students are on break so is the staff. The only people at school will be the principal and his assistance principals.
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Old August 20th, 2011, 06:14 PM
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It think it would cost less to air condition the schools than to continue to pay the price associated with a grotesquely underperforming educational system. What we need is "year-round education," not "year-round schools." Big difference. And I don't much care what teachers would think about working 50 weeks a year. The rest of the workforce does that.

The latest statistics on how badly we are trailing in educational accomplishment are more than sobering, and if we don't get on the ball and fix it the rest of the world will continue to eat our lunch--only worse.

And don't answer with "my kid's smart," or "my kid's school is great." I'm sure that's true in your case, but everybody else is a mess. Also, please don't cite NEA statistics (they have an axe to grind).

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Old August 20th, 2011, 09:11 PM
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I think "year-round school" is a wonderful idea!

We didn't have AC in our school's when I went, but they do now. We are falling so far behind in educating our children that I think we should do anything and everything to do better!

The original reason (at least in the south) for children to be out of school in the summer, was to help with harvesting the crops. Since this isn't necessary now, I see no reason to let children take 3 month's off .

JMHO,
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Old August 20th, 2011, 09:34 PM
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I have "mixed feelings" toward year round school. First it would change the fact that there would not longer be the traditional "eight week" sleep over camps. I have fond memories of going away to "sleep away" camp. Children learn so much at camp, besides learning a little independence, it is where many children learn to swim, learn how to play sports, learn arts and crafts and get involved in camp plays. Second it can be very disruptive to working parents or those parents planning a family vacation. Yes, kids can forget a lot during the summer hiatus, but, many parents' give their kids "life experiences" like vacations or summer camp that add to the ambiance of the learning process.
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Old August 20th, 2011, 10:50 PM
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We have one year around school in our town. It is immensely successful. They get the same aomount of vacation but it's spread over the year more than the normal schedule.

Summers off were a result of an agricultural eocnomy which largely no longer exists. Kids were expected to help on the farm, which many no longer are.

It is a result of the changes in our society and is, in my opinion, a big plus. At least the figures from that school substantiate that.

Todd.
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Old August 20th, 2011, 11:16 PM
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I have "mixed feelings" toward year round school. First it would change the fact that there would not longer be the traditional "eight week" sleep over camps. I have fond memories of going away to "sleep away" camp. Children learn so much at camp, besides learning a little independence, it is where many children learn to swim, learn how to play sports, learn arts and crafts and get involved in camp plays. Second it can be very disruptive to working parents or those parents planning a family vacation. Yes, kids can forget a lot during the summer hiatus, but, many parents' give their kids "life experiences" like vacations or summer camp that add to the ambiance of the learning process.
I think it's wonderful for kids to go to camp, learn to swim, learn to play, get life experiences.

I think it's even more wonderful for them to learn to read, write, and to 'rithmatic.

Somebody said that countries that outteach us today will outcompete us tomorrow. And TONS of countries are outteaching us right now.

Please read this article. It explains a study that compared other countries' educational achievement not with the United States, but with each of our states individually. None of our states are anything to brag about, and I'd mention which ones are least accomplished, but Marc might get mad at me. So read it for yourself. Really interesting stuff. . .

Your Child Left Behind - Magazine - The Atlantic

And think of this article the next time politicians cut your education budgets and threaten to abolish the Department of Education.
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Old August 20th, 2011, 11:33 PM
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I personally believe that school curriculums need to be restructured . I would make algebra ,geometry and trigonometry elective and not mandatory .I would make literature classes mandatory .
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Old August 21st, 2011, 12:05 AM
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Aren't Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Literature all mandatory in every state?
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Old August 21st, 2011, 08:18 AM
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I just typed out a long postings about the quality of education in different parts of the U.S.. I deleted it.

When we lived in Birmingham and Atlanta we enjoyed a much lower tax rate than we did in Minnesota. We got what we paid for in terms of quality of education. Then again, it wasn't really any savings because we had to put the kids in private school.

There is terrible waste and excess spending in our education system but there needs to be more emphasis on "Education" and quality educators and less emphasis on social programs. Educate and motivate kids and they'll take care of the rest.

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Old August 21st, 2011, 09:11 AM
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I personally believe that school curriculums need to be restructured . I would make algebra ,geometry and trigonometry elective and not mandatory .I would make literature classes mandatory .
Good point that you didn't mention Math. I think Algebra should be left in there, however Trig & Geometry can be replaced with the basics of Probability & Statistics. I don't think students can ever escape the importance of Math. Literature and writing classes should definitely be mandatory.
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Old August 21st, 2011, 09:39 AM
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Aren't Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Literature all mandatory in every state?
No, I don't think they're mandatory in any state for students who aren't on a college track. If you want to get into college, then, yes, as a practical matter you have to have some passing acquaintance with basic math skills.

I strongly disasgree with Henry that math should be elective in high school. I had four years of college prep math and never went on to anything like a career in numbers. But throughout my life I've been keenly aware of the value of that part of my education. In addition to the specific skills, a grounding in math brings with it orderly thinking, logic, and reasoning skills. It also helps you to balance your checkbook, make a budget, read a map, and not get snookered into a mortgage you really can't afford. It is an integral part of a well-rounded education and it should not be put on the back burner.

When I was a senior in the little backwater New Jersey public high school I attended, Mr. Kuntz was head of the math department. Around the holidays of that year he gave us each a paperback book published by Chrysler called "Math Problems from Industry." In it were some of the toughest, real-world math problems you can imagine. The book was meant for college engineering students. Mr. Kuntz asked us to work on these problems until the end of the year, told us that we would not be graded on them, that he'd be pleased if we'd get together with friends and work in groups, and that we were free to turn them in to him or not come June. He concluded his note (I saved it) as follows:

"Work proudly and with joy, whether College Math IV is the end of your math career, or just the beginning. You will never regret it."

Nobody figured out all the problems. But we did get together in groups, and we did work proudly, and we solved our fair share of them. We'd actually celebrate when we came up with a solution to one of them.

Thank you, Mr. Kuntz. I reckon if any teacher pulled a similar stunt today, some parents would stage a torchlight parade to the school accusing the teacher of working their children too hard.

I think it's interesting that the state whose governor is busy touting all the jobs he's creating turns out to be last in the nation in the percentage of students who graduate from high school--even with the dumbed-down curricula since the days of Mr. Kuntz. Even scarier, fewer than half of those who do graduate in that state go on to higher education. Most of those jobs are dead-end, minimum-wage or less, positions.

Henry, most Asian countries are eating our lunch when it comes to science and math. Far from demanding too much math of our students, we're demanding way too little.

We are becoming a nation of educational philistines, and we shall pay a terrible price.
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Old August 21st, 2011, 10:17 AM
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We are destroying both our country and our children with our current public school systems, at least when compared to other countries.

It's not just the teachers but the breakdown of what I refer to as "The Traditional Family" and its value system. Our teachers are also, just now, being faced with "their proven worth" throughout the country, despite the power of the NEA.

When I held elective office, the people in the local school system voted on the budget. Of course they voted to cut it. What the overwhleming majority didn't know that the budget on which they voted did not include "contractual obligations" meaning, of course, teacher's salaries. What they in effect were voting to degrade were, for simplicity, a lot of things that make schools and those include traditional sports, band, field trips, etc. If any politician (read yours truly) made any comment about the astronomical teacher's salaries (and this was back in the mid nineties -- think what they must be today) the NEA branded you as "anti-education." I happen to believe that good teachers are worth their weight in gold. Problem is, I've met (and I kid you not) teachers that probably could have barely graduated high school were they to have lived back in the sixties. Yet many are today, in some states making upwards of 90 grand a year, failing miserably in their jobs to educate the students in the basics. Many of my age, when we look at a current high school curriculum, fall over when we see how much it lacks in the basics. My field, as you know is history and that is about which I'll opinionate. I recently (about a year ago) reviewed a common American History textbook and it was absolutely filled with half-truths and "dumbed down" to the point that I was aghast. In an attempt not to upset any ethnic or national group, in some cases whole important sections were either left out or re-written to include actually "false" history. Do you know that any American history whatsoever wasn't even mentioned until page 43?!!!

All we're doing is an unconscionable disservice to our children, well intentioned though it might be. Another example are college sports heroes, many of whom could no more meet today's standards for a high school diploma than fly a kite to the moon yet get full scholarships to some of the best colleges in the country while those who should be in college (of all ethnic groups and nationalities) and who would be standouts in the future but can't afford to go to college, languish at places such as McDonald's and other minimum wage jobs, if they can even find them!

It's a true travesty.

Todd
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Old August 21st, 2011, 10:28 AM
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My take on it is that educators need to get back to teaching. Stop letting kids use calculators for everything in math and have them actually learn how to work the problem instead of just punching numbers. Kids no longer have to think or problem solve. Schools district are worried about state test scores.

The new young teachers are lazy and are the generation Y who have had everything handed to them and do very little and expect to be paid for it. My child is a sophomore and I see it. Please don’t get me wrong there are many great teachers out there but there are many who are not. My son has had teachers have temper tantrums in class because of one or two students who act up so the whole class pays the price. He has had teachers say “don’t talk to me”!
Do you not see the poor work ethic amongst younger workers in stores, restaurants and so forth? Teachers & principals need to be held a little more accountable and states need to get over basing everything on test scores.
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Old August 21st, 2011, 10:45 AM
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I strongly disagree with Henry that math should be elective in high school. I had four years of college prep math and never went on to anything like a career in numbers. But throughout my life I've been keenly aware of the value of that part of my education. In addition to the specific skills, a grounding in math brings with it orderly thinking, logic, and reasoning skills. It also helps you to balance your checkbook, make a budget, read a map, and not get snookered into a mortgage you really can't afford. It is an integral part of a well-rounded education and it should not be put on the back burner.
Well said.

I am constantly amazed with the number of people who cannot balance a checkbook, budget their personal spending and have no understanding of a basic mortgage, let alone an Adjustable Rate Mortgage. They still go ahead and sign the papers without knowing what they are getting into and later blaming someone else because they had no idea what they were getting into.

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Old August 21st, 2011, 03:41 PM
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No, I don't think they're mandatory in any state for students who aren't on a college track. If you want to get into college, then, yes, as a practical matter you have to have some passing acquaintance with basic math skills.

I strongly disasgree with Henry that math should be elective in high school. I had four years of college prep math and never went on to anything like a career in numbers. But throughout my life I've been keenly aware of the value of that part of my education. In addition to the specific skills, a grounding in math brings with it orderly thinking, logic, and reasoning skills. It also helps you to balance your checkbook, make a budget, read a map, and not get snookered into a mortgage you really can't afford. It is an integral part of a well-rounded education and it should not be put on the back burner.

When I was a senior in the little backwater New Jersey public high school I attended, Mr. Kuntz was head of the math department. Around the holidays of that year he gave us each a paperback book published by Chrysler called "Math Problems from Industry." In it were some of the toughest, real-world math problems you can imagine. The book was meant for college engineering students. Mr. Kuntz asked us to work on these problems until the end of the year, told us that we would not be graded on them, that he'd be pleased if we'd get together with friends and work in groups, and that we were free to turn them in to him or not come June. He concluded his note (I saved it) as follows:

"Work proudly and with joy, whether College Math IV is the end of your math career, or just the beginning. You will never regret it."

Nobody figured out all the problems. But we did get together in groups, and we did work proudly, and we solved our fair share of them. We'd actually celebrate when we came up with a solution to one of them.

Thank you, Mr. Kuntz. I reckon if any teacher pulled a similar stunt today, some parents would stage a torchlight parade to the school accusing the teacher of working their children too hard.

I think it's interesting that the state whose governor is busy touting all the jobs he's creating turns out to be last in the nation in the percentage of students who graduate from high school--even with the dumbed-down curricula since the days of Mr. Kuntz. Even scarier, fewer than half of those who do graduate in that state go on to higher education. Most of those jobs are dead-end, minimum-wage or less, positions.

Henry, most Asian countries are eating our lunch when it comes to science and math. Far from demanding too much math of our students, we're demanding way too little.

We are becoming a nation of educational philistines, and we shall pay a terrible price.
When I was a junior in HS I was in my second year of taking Spanish . My teacher recommended me for an honors program that mandated that the student take a minimum of 2 languages on a college level .I had great difficulty getting into the program having failed geometry 2 times .My teacher perservered and got me into the program .I took spanish ,german and hebrew receiving A's in all 3 .
I've never had a job in which a knowledge of geometry ,trig or calculus would have made a difference .
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Old August 21st, 2011, 06:44 PM
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When I was a junior in HS I was in my second year of taking Spanish . My teacher recommended me for an honors program that mandated that the student take a minimum of 2 languages on a college level .I had great difficulty getting into the program having failed geometry 2 times .My teacher perservered and got me into the program .I took spanish ,german and hebrew receiving A's in all 3 .
I've never had a job in which a knowledge of geometry ,trig or calculus would have made a difference .
Henry,

You really have to take a broader view of the world than your own personal experiences. Without the maths and scientists we would not have had the amazing advances in technology, science and medicine.

You can't know how to build pacemakers by reading Shakespere.

Numbers are a core to so many things in life. eg bloodpressure, sugar levels, arrythmias, etc.

Without math and science you'd be left with kids behind the counter at McDonalds who don't know how to make change on a transaction without the cash register telling them what it is. Oh wait.... we have that now.
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Old August 21st, 2011, 09:44 PM
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Henry,

You really have to take a broader view of the world than your own personal experiences. Without the maths and scientists we would not have had the amazing advances in technology, science and medicine.

You can't know how to build pacemakers by reading Shakespere.

Numbers are a core to so many things in life. eg bloodpressure, sugar levels, arrythmias, etc.

Without math and science you'd be left with kids behind the counter at McDonalds who don't know how to make change on a transaction without the cash register telling them what it is. Oh wait.... we have that now.

I said nothing about science .I said nothing about mathematics in the broad sense .I specifically stated geometry ,algebra,calculus and trigonometry.
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