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-   -   Lifeboat Supplies (http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/chit-chat-cruisers/384069-lifeboat-supplies.html)

venice August 2nd, 2011 07:24 AM

Lifeboat Supplies
 
I was looking at a picture from my jazz cruise on the Carnival Liberty and it had a lifeboat in it and noticed that the lifeboat stated it could hold 150 psgrs...made me wonder, since there are alot of ships in the Caribbean at any given time on any given day..rescue by another ship should be in hours instead of days..what types of supplies are really onboard a lifeboat and are the supplies different on a transatlantic crossing ?

Manuel August 2nd, 2011 09:52 AM

Great question Venice!

I hope that someone has the answer.

TM

Lakers Fan August 2nd, 2011 11:43 AM

Venice
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by venice (Post 1384713)
I was looking at a picture from my jazz cruise on the Carnival Liberty and it had a lifeboat in it and noticed that the lifeboat stated it could hold 150 psgrs...made me wonder, since there are alot of ships in the Caribbean at any given time on any given day..rescue by another ship should be in hours instead of days..what types of supplies are really onboard a lifeboat and are the supplies different on a transatlantic crossing ?


Rather than starting a new thread ,I have a lifeboat related question .
If there is a disaster aboard ship and a passenger refuses to go into a lifeboat does the passenger have the right to stay aboard ship ?

Dhill August 3rd, 2011 12:44 AM

I dont know the answer to either of those questions and I hope I never have to find out!;)

Bruce Chafkin1 August 3rd, 2011 02:40 AM

Most ship's lifeboats today have a listed maximum capacity of 150 people.

That 150 number is unfortunately based on the size of the average passenger nearly 100 years ago.
In actual testing today, we can fit 150 Filipinos into one of these boats. but not 150 North Americans.
75 to 100 passengers is a much more realistic maximum for these lifeboats.

But not to worry. The average cruise ship has nearly double capacity of lifeboats, plus many extra lift rafts standing by.

Each lifeboat carries 3 liters of water per passenger (150), plus a one week supply of rations (biscuits or crackers) for 150 people.
With todays modern communications networks, the news of a ship going down in mid-Atlantic would be received just as fast as the news of a ship going down in the Caribbean. In either case, assistance or rescue would be less than a day away.

venice August 3rd, 2011 07:40 AM

Bruce..thanks for your response..just curious..why crackers ? aren't they salty and would cause one to drink more water ?...should they not have granola bars instead ?

Henry..I bet somewhere in the contract of carriage it states that if a passenger refuses to follow the instructions of the crew in case of an emergency, then the cruise line is not liable for what happens to him..but why would a person not want to get off a sinking ship ?

I would suspect that one's first instinct in a real evacuation is to go back to your cabin and get valuables rather then go to the lifeboat station

Bruce Chafkin1 August 3rd, 2011 08:09 AM

Salted crackers are salty.
The crackers/biscuits on the life boats are not salted.

If some passenger is dumb enough to refuse to board a lifeboat to escape a sinking ship, why would you want to force him to go?
Heaven forbid that he would survive to reproduce.
This would also leave more water and food for the ones smart enough to get into the lifeboat.
Charles Darwin was right.
The very last thing the world needs today is more stupid people.

Lakers Fan August 3rd, 2011 11:56 AM

Venice
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by venice (Post 1384946)
Bruce..thanks for your response..just curious..why crackers ? aren't they salty and would cause one to drink more water ?...should they not have granola bars instead ?

Henry..I bet somewhere in the contract of carriage it states that if a passenger refuses to follow the instructions of the crew in case of an emergency, then the cruise line is not liable for what happens to him..but why would a person not want to get off a sinking ship ?

I would suspect that one's first instinct in a real evacuation is to go back to your cabin and get valuables rather then go to the lifeboat station

When the Titanic was sinking the musicians opted to complete what they were playing and went down with the ship .

Phil&Liz August 3rd, 2011 09:44 PM

How often are the supplies checked and refreshed?

I had been told that on naval vessels there is an assumed loss of life during the emergency and so there is not the even ratio of space available to lives aboard.

Lakers Fan August 4th, 2011 12:32 AM

If I had my druthers I would choose to be in my cabin with a bowl of delicious ice cream in a ship as it reached Davey Jones Locker .

Bruce Chafkin1 August 5th, 2011 03:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Phil&Liz (Post 1385112)
How often are the supplies checked and refreshed?

I had been told that on naval vessels there is an assumed loss of life during the emergency and so there is not the even ratio of space available to lives aboard.

Supplies are checked every 30 days.
Refreshed every 2 years.

I rarely recommend taking a cruise on a naval vessel.
Cruising on a non-naval vessel is not only far more comfortable and enjoyable, but we do not have an assumed loss of life in the equation.


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