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-   -   Who likes repositioning cruises? (http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/chit-chat-cruisers/389721-who-likes-repositioning-cruises.html)

balabusta June 2nd, 2012 07:39 PM

Who likes repositioning cruises?
 
When Rob and I were on our "repositioning cruise" at the end of April and the beginning of May, we immediately booked another "repositioning cruise" to Europe plus we will stay on the ship for another eleven days to tour the British Isles. As you can guess, we are excited about going! How many of my fellow cruisemates have been on a "repositioning cruise?"

Marc June 2nd, 2012 10:03 PM

I love repositioning cruises; but prefer the fall East to West cruises so you get longer days. My next cruise is Monte Carlo to Rio this November.

Trackypup June 2nd, 2012 10:06 PM

I'm not sure. My repositioning cruises have only been little. My transatlantic next year will be the first with that many sea days. I might enjoy it or I might go stir crazy

balabusta June 2nd, 2012 10:10 PM

Marc, have a wonderful time on your next "repositioning cruise". It is hard for Rob and I to go on one in the fall because it usually occurs during our older grandson's birthday. (Right now he still wants us to be there for his birthday). To me, a "repositioning cruise" is definitely the "best bang for the buck". Rob and I don't mind the days at sea because there are so many activities planned on the ship and I do like going to the smaller ports. Where else can one get a two week cruise for the price of one week?

balabusta June 2nd, 2012 10:16 PM

Trackypup; keep an open mind with repositioning cruises. If you go on your cruise with a "positive attitude", that will help you enjoy those days at sea. I always bring one or two books to read to help pass the time during the day but mainly, I find the lecturers on repositioning cruises to be quite interesting.

Trackypup June 2nd, 2012 10:21 PM

Thanks - we're going with good friends on a brand new ship so there should be lots to do and explore. My IPad will be loaded with books and magazines. I think I read 5 books on our panama canal cruise so sky's the limit on a transatlantic. There really is so much going on that you just have to participate.

belgique June 2nd, 2012 11:16 PM

Two great re-po cruises I've taken are the Maasdam from New York to Fort Lauderdale - 13 days, covered lots of the Caribbean.

Also, Costa Atlantica from Genoa to Lauderdale with stops in Barcelona, Tenerife, Barbados, St. Maarten, St. Thomas and then Lauderdale - 14 days total.

I highly recommend repo cruises!

Trackypup June 2nd, 2012 11:23 PM

Thanks! we're going to be on the new Royal Princess...can't wait :)

balabusta June 2nd, 2012 11:23 PM

Belgique, Rob and I absolutely loved Barcelona; that is where our most recent repositioning cruise ended. We spend three wonderful days in Barcelona admiring the Gaudi architecture, tasting the delicious tapas, and going to Montserrat. I would definitely return to Barcelona!

AR June 3rd, 2012 12:48 AM

We've taken about a half dozen of them and like them OK, although we've been talking about the fact that we want to do some cruises that we haven't done yet, especially to South America.


Usually we use repos as transportation to get somewhere we want to go, or to come home from same. I'm always a bit stunned at the huge numbers of people who fly to the cruise, sail immediately, then fly back home on the day it ends. Sea days are nice, and we enjoy them too, but there's a big world out there.


We just took a repo to Southampton, then flew across the Channel to Guernsey so I could continue my family history research. We've always got some sort of agenda associated with a repo.

The well-known expert-of-the-seas and frequent cruise lecturer John Maxtone-Graham has always maintined that the vibe tends to be entirely different on crossings among the people who are "going somewhere." He claims that the shared excitement about what's at the other end (as opposed to a four hour tour at a port stop) creates an atmosphere that's totally different from, say, a Caribbean cruise.

I think he's right to a certain extent, although with so many people just cruising for the experience of being on the ship, sometimes that excitement is a bit muted. It's also obviously true that on virtually any line the age range of the passengers will skew toward the high side compared to many other cruises.

It's also worth noting that crossings are heavily populated by "crossing junkies." These are either bargain hunters or cheapskates, depending on your point of view. They tend to be elderly, they take crossings more or less exclusively because they generally offer the cheapest per day fares out there. Therefore these people quickly earn top status in the line's frequent cruiser club. They covet these perks and they make full use of them, especially where free alcohol is involved. They tend to not spend for a lot of "extras," and are high on the list of those who complain about "nickel and diming." This can work to the advantage other passengers who enjoy, for example, specialty restaurants, because tables are often easily available on crossings, even for multiple visits.

So, there are plusses and minuses. I think it's important these days to do it on a beautiful ship with good service and interesting activities that match your interests.

Lisa June 3rd, 2012 03:51 AM

I've done two repo cruises....the first on the Enchantment of the Seas just after her stretch was done. That was a repo from Quebec City to Fort Lauderdale - only 7 days but with cruising Saguenay Ford; Corner Brook, New Foundland and Boston. That was an early October cruise and we caught the colors in Canada and then had great weather down to Florida. I loved that cruise!

The other repo cruise I did was the Jewel of the Seas from Southampton to Fort Lauderdale, stoping in Le Havre, France; Acuruna, Spain; Funchal, Madeira and then 6 glorious sea days to Fort Lauderdale. My first and only transatlantic and I loved the 25 hour days! I didn't get bored at all; and loved our tour of Normandy from Le Havre.

I would do both those itineraries again...........

johnthed0g June 3rd, 2012 05:43 AM

P&O (UK) position one or two ships in the Caribbean during our winter so when they go out & return you can take advantage of reasonable prices. Personally I don't see the point of flying out there & sailing home via 3 or 4 islands, or the reverse of sailing out via a few places then flying home. What we DO fancy is flying out to Barbados, STAYING for a while THEN having a leisurely cruise home.

Pootersdad June 3rd, 2012 07:35 AM

Repositioning Cruises
 
We love repositioning cruises. We've done the Jewel OTS repo Boston-Florida for six years in a row, and will do it again this October. Plus, we're doing the same itinerary on Brilliance OTS in October '13. We've also done two repos from Harwich to Boston.

We love them for a variety of reasons - seeing old friends again, enjoying the ships themselves (really like the Radiance class), etc. Do we get tired of the same itinerary? Nope!

Luanne Russo June 3rd, 2012 08:36 AM

We have never taken one, but would love to in the future.

Could someone define a repositioning for those who are checking out the web site to learn more about cruising?

Cruznut2 June 3rd, 2012 09:16 AM

I have never done one. I have had my eye on the repositioning cruise from Boston to Florida in the Norwegian Dawn. My cousins do that one every year. We still have family in the Boston area. They fly up early and spend time with family, Then they and some of the family all cruise to Florida for a visit. I was looking to do that for the same reason. I think I would really enjoy it.

Laura

johnthed0g June 3rd, 2012 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luanne Russo (Post 1431052)
We have never taken one, but would love to in the future.

Could someone define a repositioning for those who are checking out the web site to learn more about cruising?

As I see it the cruise line positions a ship for a season ..say from Europe to the Caribbean, usually October to March, then they bring it back to cruise the Mediterranean the rest of the year. In effect they are getting us to pay for them doing this trip each way so the prices are usually a bit cheaper.

blueliner June 3rd, 2012 10:39 AM

We did a great repositioning cruise in 2007 when we sailed on the Vision OTS last Alaska cruise of the season and then sailed her down the California coast with a stop in San Francisco on our way to Los Angeles. It was a 9 night cruise in total.

Paul Motter June 3rd, 2012 12:58 PM

I like AR's comments - first about using them as transportation to get someplace. I think this makes complete sense - not only do you get a nice cruise but you also end up someplace special. Often the cruise across the Atlantic (for example) costs the same as an air ticket, but you get 10-12 days of cruising out of it and hopefully some nice ports of call.

I also like what he said about "cheap skates" while I do not know this to be true (I have crossed the Atlantic five times, but four times I was working and once as a passenger I was on Queen Mary 2, which in my book is "the only way to cross.") it certainly makes sense. You would accrue a lot of cruise points, especially now that most cruise lines have gone to a "days onboard" counting system rather than a "number of cruises" counting system.

I have certainly heard stories about such people, though, so I assume there is truth to the concept.

But I don't generally judge a cruise based upon my fellow non-familial passengers as much as I base it on my personal experience and interaction with the staff, dining and entertainment.

AR June 3rd, 2012 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Luanne Russo (Post 1431052)
Could someone define a repositioning for those who are checking out the web site to learn more about cruising?

I guess the more or less standard definition for a repo cruise is an itinerary that takes the ship from one distinct part of the world to another for the purpose of positioning the ship to do a series of cruises in the new geographic region. Although there are many different flavors, probably the most common repos are across the Atlantic between Europe and Florida/Caribbean. These run eastbound (to Europe) in the spring and westbound back to the warm weather in the fall.

Accordingly, repos generally have a far higher number of sea days than the normal cruise, although the lines tend to work in a port stop or two when they can. Still, on an Atlantic repo, you can pretty much count on a week of non-stop sea days.

Figured on a per day basis, repos tend to be some of the cheapest cruises out there. They attract retirees (who have the time to spend on longer cruises), bargain hunters (because of the cheap fares), and a number of serious world travelers who use the cruises as transportation to interesting places.

Some people dislike eastbound runs in the spring because on most nights clocks are reset forward an hour as the ship passes through the various time zones. This results in many "23-hour days." Conversely, on westbound crossings clocks are retarded an hour on most nights, "adding" an hour to each day. On the other hand, westbound runs in the fall are more likely to encounter storms than springtime trips.

People always ask what the weather is going to be like on their crossing. The answer is that nobody knows. It can be beautiful and it can be miserable, and trying to predict it is a fool's errand. The sea has a mind of her own, and repos generally happen at meteorologically volatile times of the year on the ocean.

belgique June 4th, 2012 12:29 AM

I also think the repo cruises through the Panama Canal are wonderful - Seattle to Lauderdale in fall, or the reverse in spring when they are taking the ships to Alaska for the summer.

Some good deals, interesting ports, and nice prices.

Trackypup June 4th, 2012 12:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by belgique (Post 1431209)
I also think the repo cruises through the Panama Canal are wonderful - Seattle to Lauderdale in fall, or the reverse in spring when they are taking the ships to Alaska for the summer.

Some good deals, interesting ports, and nice prices.

We did that last year. Couple of days in the Keys and then 17 days Ft Lauderdale to Vancouver. Loved Costa Rica - now I want to do a Windstar Costa Rica cruise.

Pootersdad June 4th, 2012 06:31 AM

Repo Cruises
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AR (Post 1431100)
People always ask what the weather is going to be like on their crossing. The answer is that nobody knows. It can be beautiful and it can be miserable, and trying to predict it is a fool's errand. The sea has a mind of her own, and repos generally happen at meteorologically volatile times of the year on the ocean.

On our first transatlantic (repo) cruise, we ran into the remains of hurricane Gustav. Very strong winds, very high seas. On the second TA, it was as smooth as glass the entire time. Both were in September.:rolleyes:

balabusta June 4th, 2012 03:23 PM

What a great article, AR! Rob and I are "totally hooked" on repositioning cruises. Just think, a little more than ten years ago, the ships had no passengers except the crew when they were going from the caribbean to europe and vise versa. Thank G-d somebody had the "brilliant idea" to make some money on this trip and include passangers!

CostaSmurf June 5th, 2012 04:33 AM

I love repositioning cruises.....lots of sea days....longer cruises.....perfect :)

Having done so many cruises of tween 3 and 6 weeks in length, there is no way I could do a 7 day one now. Can't beat repositionings for value either, especially as a solo like me.

This year was a a 3 week cruise, next year its just under 5 weeks doing a repositioning with a 7 night tacked on the end of it...heaven :)

rayb June 5th, 2012 09:26 AM

Heck I have to go to my records to tell you how many repos I have done. A bunch for sure. I really like repos and long cruises. My thoughts are: Why pack for a short one when you have to unpack and the the next day or so you have to pack up again. Stay onboard and enjoy the activities and sea.

balabusta June 5th, 2012 10:06 AM

Rayb, I certainly agree with you about the "packing and unpacking". There's nothing greater than leisurely spending your time at sea!


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