Go Back   CruiseMates Cruise Community and Forums > People > Chit - Chat for Cruisers
Register Forgot Password?

Chit - Chat for Cruisers Open Forum for non-cruise posts. Please refrain from inflammatory rhetoric that could be considered offensive. We reserve the right to edit or delete for any reason.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old June 24th, 2012, 04:35 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default Quo Vadis Escargot

I am interested in finding out where the cruise lines get their escargot. I saw Master Chief inquiry asking if escargot are back on the Carnival menus? He said they had been taken off awhile back and were not available for a while.

I had seen this type comment about lack of snails on menu and the response that you could still get them in the specialty restaurant. However, I also read at the time of the first inquiry that Barbados was suffering with a plague of snails.

This led me to my question about where do the cruise lines get the snails they offer as escargot.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old June 24th, 2012, 05:17 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Dallas, Tx
Posts: 784
Default

There's a worldwide snail shortage this year. While the cruise lines can get some they aren't able to get enough for the 250k passengers that sail each week. It came up on my last cruise and they said it was temporary.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old June 24th, 2012, 09:52 PM
nlb1050's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fort Pierce, FL
Posts: 1,655
Default

From what John heald stated on Facebook and his blog Carnical and most all cruise lines get them from Sout Asia, can't remember exactly which country.
__________________
Nancy



Guadeloupe Accommodations



Star Princess 2005, Sun Princess 2005
Caribbean Princess 2006, MSC Lirica 2006 , NCL Pearl 2007, Majesty of the Seas 2008, Carnival Destiny 2008, MSC Lirica 2009, Carnival Valor 2009,Carnival Legend 2010, Carnival Liberty 2010,Carnival Fantsay 2011,Carnival Valor Feb 2012, MSC Poesia Dec 2012, MSC Poesia April 2013, Carnival Legend Nov 2013, MSC DIVINA Jan 2014
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old June 28th, 2012, 05:13 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default Answer to Oui est l'escargot?

After seeing conflicting comments like the following:
"There is a drought in Indonesia where most of the Escargot come from."
"As you know we have had to stop serving Escargot in the dining rooms due to supply problems caused by terrible floods in Indonesia."
Drought? Floods?

I did a little more research on the subject and found the following information.

Snails: Raw Materials Short Due to Poor Weather Conditions
Source Schreiber Foods international, Inc. Posted on June 4, 2012 by foodblog

Snails (shelled mollusks) are related to clams and oysters except they live on land and not in the ocean. There are two basic types of snails: the Helix snail, or European land snail with spiral shells, and the Achatine, or Asian snail that lives in swampy areas. Our Ambrosia snails are of the Achatine type and come from Indonesia. Snail meat is used for escargot and is usually served in its shell with a special sauce that includes garlic, butter, wine and spices. Our Ambrosia snails are cooked in brine with spices, herbs and vegetables before canning, thus they have a savory flavor right out of the can.

Snails have been extremely scarce during the past two years in Indonesia. Packers normally source snails during the rainy season that lasts from November through March. Snails are obtained from the wild Ė they arenít farmed like most of the European Helix snails are, and are therefore very sensitive to weather conditions. Last year the rainy season was very short and this year it was extremely tough, with lots of flooding in the area snails are usually found. One of the largest packers claimed that they couldnít obtain enough raw materials to run the factory most days. They usually shut down the facilities during the dry season but this year they are planning to run longer and just keep packing as raw material comes in to fill orders. Since there are so many unfilled orders we canít expect this situation to ease up until after next yearís rainy season.

My only question is why they can't use the European land snail?

I love escargot smothered in butter and garlic. To me a cruise is not successful unless there is escargot on my plate. On my next cruise, I am going to check for pay restaurants for escargot availability if it not offered in the main restaurants.

Thanks Aerospace and nlb1050 for your inputs
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old June 28th, 2012, 06:35 PM
AR AR is offline
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,473
Default

Here's my recipe for success. . .

Cut up some mushrooms into small pieces and stuff them into old snail shells.

Add the standard butter and garlic mixture as usual.

Voila!!
__________________
The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. -- George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old June 29th, 2012, 05:59 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AR View Post
Here's my recipe for success. . .

Cut up some mushrooms into small pieces and stuff them into old snail shells.

Add the standard butter and garlic mixture as usual.

Voila!!
You don't even need mushrooms, brussel sprouts will do. Thanks for the reciipe.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old June 29th, 2012, 09:19 PM
OldFartCruiser's Avatar
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ship's Balcony
Posts: 233
Default

On a B2B total 14 day Caribbean cruise this past February on the Celebrity Solstice I had escargot every night in the MDR. Don't know where they came from but no shortage on the Solstice.

O F C'er
__________________
Experiences over the years enabled me to have all the answers, but not necessarily corresponding with your questions.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old July 2nd, 2012, 09:50 PM
Junior Member
Familiar Face
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 21
Default

I found an old column discussing that they come from Indonesia...

But I see Bonnie Prince has taken care of responding.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old July 11th, 2012, 04:10 PM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default Celebrity Solstice Great Food

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFartCruiser View Post
On a B2B total 14 day Caribbean cruise this past February on the Celebrity Solstice I had escargot every night in the MDR. Don't know where they came from but no shortage on the Solstice.

O F C'er
I was on the Celebrity Solstice one month after her maiden voyage and I thought that of all the cruise lines I had been on the Solstice had a great
menu consistently. I would expect that if there was one ship that could come up with escargot it would be the Solstice.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old July 11th, 2012, 10:13 PM
AR AR is offline
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,473
Default

This thread is proceeding at a snail's pace.
__________________
The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place. -- George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old July 12th, 2012, 05:56 AM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default Snail pace -Very clever. You might like this "Giant African Snail Farming Made Fun."

Quote:
Originally Posted by AR View Post
This thread is proceeding at a snail's pace.
I thought this article was an additional bit of snail farmacology. The snails aare banned by US governement for human consumption. So they probably will not be on ships.

Lagos, Nigeria (CNN) -- The harvesting of snails as a delicacy has traditionally been synonymous with countries such as France and Italy.

But for one savvy entrepreneur in Nigeria, a giant version of the meaty mollusc is helping him tap into a market he says can generate high profits with little initial outlay.

Snail farming is often done small-scale at the back of homes and office compounds in the Nigerian city of Lagos. That's where businessman Ismail AbdulAzeez is rearing giant African snails, which can grow up to 20 cm (7.9 inches) in length.

"To get something like this," says AbdulAzeez holding up a snail shell the size of his palm, "you'll (initially) spend about 25 Naira (16 cents), assuming you're working with about 10,000 snails at a time."

But once fully grown, the snails can sell for 250 Naira ($1.64), depending on the season, he says.

AbdulAzeez has just sold his latest harvest to a number of luxury hotels and high-class restaurants in Lagos.

But he says the snails he grows are also receiving the attention of foreign buyers in Europe and beyond -- attracted by the size of the snails and their relatively low price.

The UK, Norway and other European countries are some of the final destinations for his snails.

And AbdulAzeez is quick to point out the potential that start ups such as his own could have in helping other young entrepreneurs climb their way out of poverty.

He claims to have so far taught more than 1,000 people how to create their own snail farm businesses and says that those who are successful could earn as much as $15,000 every two years.

I would say that the snail farming provides opportunities that are yet to be seized.

--K.A. Monney, author of Giant African Snail Farming Made Fun
RELATED TOPICS
Africa
West Africa
Business
But others say snail farming in Nigeria, and other West African countries remains, on the whole, an area of unfulfilled potential.

According to K.A. Monney, head of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife at Ghana's University of Cape Coast, snail entrepreneurs like AbdulAzeez remain the exception rather than the rule.

"Such ventures are lacking in Africa, I am afraid. To the best of my knowledge snail farming attempts have been sporadic," says Monney, who is also author of the book, "Giant African Snail Farming Made Fun."

He adds that while some businesses may have brought structure, order and professionalism to the sector, much of what passes for snail harvesting in West Africa remains opportunistic.

During the West African wet season of April to August -- when snails break their otherwise dormant state in order to breed -- it is not uncommon for them to be captured in the wild and sold in local marketplaces, says Monney.

Outside of this period, however, there is a very noticeable lack of snail meat or snail product for sale almost everywhere in West Africa.

"In the dry season ... December to March, you don't get anybody selling snails," he says. "If there were farms that (is when) you would have got them."

But despite the difficulties of structure and planning, Monney believes that turning giant snail farming into a viable and profitable industry remains a distinct possibility.

"I would say that the snail farming provides opportunities that are yet to be seized. I have researched into snail farming quite a bit and the potential is there ... but it has not been explored and exploited," he says.

He adds: "My hope is that as people get to know how to produce them a commodity chain would be established."
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old July 13th, 2012, 12:32 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,260
Send a message via MSN to belgique
Default

Not sure about cruise lines, but the Helix snails we offer in the restaurant I manage are from France. Doesn't seem to be a shortage of them as they've been on our menu for years.
__________________
belgique
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old July 13th, 2012, 04:23 AM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by belgique View Post
Not sure about cruise lines, but the Helix snails we offer in the restaurant I manage are from France. Doesn't seem to be a shortage of them as they've been on our menu for years.
In France how are the escargots offered. US tradition is each one in a shell.
Is this how the helix is offered in your restaurant. If there are other dishes that escargot are offered, could you enlighten me? This email was very enlightening.
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old July 16th, 2012, 06:17 AM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default Escargot potpouri

One of the most famous dishes in French cuisine is escargot, a preparation of snails which can be served with a variety of sauces. Some American consumers find the thought of escargot somewhat disconcerting, as snails are not associated with food in the United States. However, Americans eat other mollusks, such as abalone, and some adventurous diners do try escargot at least once for the experience. When well prepared, the flavor and texture can be quite delightful, and snails have been enjoyed in many Mediterranean nations for centuries.While people who are not from France think that the word refers to a specific dish, in fact it is a generic term for edible snails. The most common preparation for escargot is boiling or steaming, and the snails are often served in the shell on a special escargot plate, which has small depressions for each shell. Diners use tongs to extract the flesh from the shell, along with small two-tined snail forks, and then dip the snail into the sauce provided. A garlic and butter sauce is the most common, but wine sauces and others are not unusual.
Snails can be collected in the wild or farmed for prepared escargot. Farmed snails are fed on a mixture of green and dried foods, with some snail raisers preferring dried food because it is less messy than fresh greens. Some cooks also feed the snails herbs like dill to lend a delicate flavor to the escargot. Either way, the snails must go through a period of fasting which usually lasts for one week before being prepared to cleanse their intestines, which can make the dish turn bitter if not completely emptied. During the fasting period, the snails are kept in wooden ventilated boxes and food is withheld. The snails are gently washed every other day in running water, with stimulates them to empty their guts.Some cooks salt their snails, producing a large amount of foam which removes the last of their impurities. Others simply throw the snails into salted boiling water for cooking before draining them and bringing them to the table to eat, either as an appetizer or an entree. Simmering the snails in a white wine can also add to the flavor, and in addition to being served plain, escargot can be tossed with pasta or used to stuff vegetables for appetizers.

So this is how the French prepare their escargot.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old July 17th, 2012, 12:11 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,260
Send a message via MSN to belgique
Default

Prepared in shell or an escargot crock. Garlic butter, shallots, snails, more garlic butter, more shallots.

Must be served with GREAT bread.
__________________
belgique
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old July 17th, 2012, 11:44 AM
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 676
Default My mouth is watering

Quote:
Originally Posted by belgique View Post
Prepared in shell or an escargot crock. Garlic butter, shallots, snails, more garlic butter, more shallots.

Must be served with GREAT bread.
What a great combination of ingredients to produce a great dish. Thank you for the information.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
2012, affecting, carnival, cruise, cruises, escargot, lagos, lines, nigeria, princess, quo, recipe, restaurant, ship, shortage, snail, vadis

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
No Escargot!!! Say it ain't so!!! Mike M Carnival Cruise Lines 17 July 3rd, 2012 07:17 AM
Escargot Master Chief Carnival Cruise Lines 14 July 2nd, 2012 09:34 PM
Free Escargot Anyone?? Trip Chit - Chat for Cruisers 8 November 9th, 2006 06:11 PM
Okay, we're outta here! And thank you to my Cruisemates &quo JeanS Chit - Chat for Cruisers 9 August 22nd, 2005 09:27 PM
Please Help!! Shore excurion suggestions W. Caribbean / &quo scott2282 Norwegian Cruise Lines 0 March 7th, 2005 02:27 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:00 PM.
design by: Themes by Design

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1