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Old June 28th, 2012, 09:25 AM
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Default Tracing the family tree

A few years ago a cousin of mine was tracing the family tree and found a relative who was in the Glenn Miller band .Apparently he and 2 other band members left to form their own group .In 1947 our relative gave up music at age 28 to live in Puerto Rico with his new bride .

I was tracing a few days ago and found that he returned to music and much to my surprise is still alive at age 95 and still actively performing .
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Old June 28th, 2012, 11:04 AM
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I found with different ships my great grandparents on my mother's side came over from Portugal to Hawaii on. My Great Grandfater came over in 1885 on a ship called "Daca." There were 27 Portuguese ships and 2 Spanish ships, total 29 ships from 1878 to 1913.

Here is the description of the ship from the ship's log:

# 1 Bark Daca

The British bark, Daca, which arrived in this port Jan. 19, 1885 on Monday, 114 days from Madeira, there was received 313 Portuguese immigrants, men, women and children. Immediately upon her arrival, she was boarded by the Health Office, and all her people were found to be in good health and spirits. There were 46 stowaways on board, and during the passage from Madeira, there had been 5 births and only 1 death. Chief Clerk Hassinger, Mr. Atwater and Mr. Marcos perfected their arrangements during the day for the landing of the immigrants and the work will commence this morning. The Hon. A.S. Cleghorn, Inspector General of immigrants, visited the vessel and inspected the immigrants and quarters. He expressed himself as highly pleased with the cleanliness of the vessel and he was of the opinion that it reflected credit upon the captain and officers. The Minister of the Interior has advertised for bids for the transportation of these people from the vessel to the Depot, and also for the food for them while under the Gov’t care. There are but 64 contract people in the lot. The Portuguese immigrants who arrived on the Daca on Monday were all transported to the Immigration Depot by 11:30 a.m. These people are a fine, healthy looking set, and as they almost all came as volunteer immigrants, their accestion (sic) to the population of the Island will be a beneficial one. The work was done under the personal supervision of M.E.C. Fishbourne, to whom the contract for their transportation and maintenance at the Depot was awarded.

The Royal Hawaiian Band played at the Immigration Depot Jan. 19, 1885, for the amusement of the newly arrived Portuguese immigrants that came on the steamship Daca. What with bustle attendant upon their settling into their quarters, the registration of individuals, and the music, the Depot was full of life. The presence of Senhor Conovarro, Portuguese Commissioner to the Immigration Depot daily, does much towards facilitating the work of shipping the people and provided for their numerous wants. The contract forms for the use of the newly arrived immigrants of the ship Daca have been prepaid and great pains had been taken that the translation shall be exact and literal. This literalness was led to the use of a little odd, by no means ambiguous English in the Documents referred to. Four (4) laborers of the Portuguese immigrants that came on the Daca and accompanied with their families, making 15 souls all told were sent to Waiakea Mill Company from the Immigration Depot, January 22, 1885. They left on the Inter-island Lehua on January 27, 1887; the balance of the Portuguese immigrants per Daca were sent to their respective destinations via Onomea Sugar Co., 7 families (28 persons in all); Honokaa Sugar Co., 8 families, 34 persons total; Koloa Sugar Co., 14 families, 63 persons total, and 2 stowaways; Ookala Sugar Co., 10 families, 50 persons total; Olowalu Sugar Co., 5 families, 19 persons total; whole number shipped: 186 persons.

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Old June 30th, 2012, 09:36 AM
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Kat, that was very interesting. I'm impressed that you were able to find all that information.

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Old June 30th, 2012, 09:42 AM
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I agree ,thats amazing and also very interesting .
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Old June 30th, 2012, 02:02 PM
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Getting a membership in a Ancestry.com can be of great help. We found many documents of my family arriving here from Italy in the early 1900's. I also read the forums and message boards. Twice I found people asking for members of the Dinardi/Bucci family that settled near Boston. One woman was from Maine and her husband is my relative. She provided me with a 1920 census of the neighborhood where I grew up. Almost everyone in that neighborhood was related to me. The area was always called "the village" It still is today and some of my cousins still live there. I was able to help them locate where her husbands grandparents were buried. It was the same cemetary where most of my relatives are buried. Everytime we find something else we still exchange the information. I also came across a man in those forums that I contacted and he and his wife live here in Florida. Shortly after I moved here they came and we had lunch together. We stayed in that restaurant for 3 hours. He and his wife had traveled to Corfinio Italy where they stayed 2 weeks. They met cousins that we never knew of. He brought a wonderful book of photos of Corfinio Italy. I was in tears looking at those beautiful photos. Imagining my grandparents growing up there. He also told me that our name was DiNardo in Italy and not DiNardi as we always knew. I knew that already as one of my uncles had told me that. We also found it on the ship's manifests listed as DiNardo. Interestingly my family never came through NY and Ellis Island. They always sailed right into Charlestown, a part of Boston. One of the things that fascinated me was that my grandparents marriage was planned by their parents. He came to Massachusetts in the early 1900's and got a job and a place to live. He saved money to bring my grandmother from Italy. She arrived in September 1908 and they were married in December. I never knew him as he died in 1942. My grandmother lived with us in my high school years. I can remember today the fresh pastas she made. I can still see in my mind her rolling the dough for the spaghetti and ravioli and gnocci and other varieties she made. She would make huge pots of sauces. It all smelled so wonderful. We had fresh home baked Italian breads with sauce on them for afternoon snacks after school. She was 4'8" and had to stand on a stool to reach the counter comfortably.



Laura
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Old June 30th, 2012, 04:39 PM
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Default Di Nardi

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruznut2 View Post
Getting a membership in a Ancestry.com can be of great help. We found many documents of my family arriving here from Italy in the early 1900's. I also read the forums and message boards. Twice I found people asking for members of the Dinardi/Bucci family that settled near Boston. One woman was from Maine and her husband is my relative. She provided me with a 1920 census of the neighborhood where I grew up. Almost everyone in that neighborhood was related to me. The area was always called "the village" It still is today and some of my cousins still live there. I was able to help them locate where her husbands grandparents were buried. It was the same cemetary where most of my relatives are buried. Everytime we find something else we still exchange the information. I also came across a man in those forums that I contacted and he and his wife live here in Florida. Shortly after I moved here they came and we had lunch together. We stayed in that restaurant for 3 hours. He and his wife had traveled to Corfinio Italy where they stayed 2 weeks. They met cousins that we never knew of. He brought a wonderful book of photos of Corfinio Italy. I was in tears looking at those beautiful photos. Imagining my grandparents growing up there. He also told me that our name was DiNardo in Italy and not DiNardi as we always knew. I knew that already as one of my uncles had told me that. We also found it on the ship's manifests listed as DiNardo. Interestingly my family never came through NY and Ellis Island. They always sailed right into Charlestown, a part of Boston. One of the things that fascinated me was that my grandparents marriage was planned by their parents. He came to Massachusetts in the early 1900's and got a job and a place to live. He saved money to bring my grandmother from Italy. She arrived in September 1908 and they were married in December. I never knew him as he died in 1942. My grandmother lived with us in my high school years. I can remember today the fresh pastas she made. I can still see in my mind her rolling the dough for the spaghetti and ravioli and gnocci and other varieties she made. She would make huge pots of sauces. It all smelled so wonderful. We had fresh home baked Italian breads with sauce on them for afternoon snacks after school. She was 4'8" and had to stand on a stool to reach the counter comfortably.



Laura
Many years ago I worked with a woman with the last name DiNardi . I can't recall her first name but she lived in Queens ,NY .
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Old July 1st, 2012, 02:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruznut2 View Post
Getting a membership in a Ancestry.com can be of great help. We found many documents of my family arriving here from Italy in the early 1900's. I also read the forums and message boards. Twice I found people asking for members of the Dinardi/Bucci family that settled near Boston. One woman was from Maine and her husband is my relative. She provided me with a 1920 census of the neighborhood where I grew up. Almost everyone in that neighborhood was related to me. The area was always called "the village" It still is today and some of my cousins still live there. I was able to help them locate where her husbands grandparents were buried. It was the same cemetary where most of my relatives are buried. Everytime we find something else we still exchange the information. I also came across a man in those forums that I contacted and he and his wife live here in Florida. Shortly after I moved here they came and we had lunch together. We stayed in that restaurant for 3 hours. He and his wife had traveled to Corfinio Italy where they stayed 2 weeks. They met cousins that we never knew of. He brought a wonderful book of photos of Corfinio Italy. I was in tears looking at those beautiful photos. Imagining my grandparents growing up there. He also told me that our name was DiNardo in Italy and not DiNardi as we always knew. I knew that already as one of my uncles had told me that. We also found it on the ship's manifests listed as DiNardo. Interestingly my family never came through NY and Ellis Island. They always sailed right into Charlestown, a part of Boston. One of the things that fascinated me was that my grandparents marriage was planned by their parents. He came to Massachusetts in the early 1900's and got a job and a place to live. He saved money to bring my grandmother from Italy. She arrived in September 1908 and they were married in December. I never knew him as he died in 1942. My grandmother lived with us in my high school years. I can remember today the fresh pastas she made. I can still see in my mind her rolling the dough for the spaghetti and ravioli and gnocci and other varieties she made. She would make huge pots of sauces. It all smelled so wonderful. We had fresh home baked Italian breads with sauce on them for afternoon snacks after school. She was 4'8" and had to stand on a stool to reach the counter comfortably.



Laura
That is amazing. What a great story.

Ancestry.com also has a DNA database for an extra cost. But I'm going to skip that, because there is a DNA database out of Madeira Island they are looking for certain Surnames. Since both sides of my family tree come for the Madeira Island so far 4 surnames of my family are on that list. I think I would get much better results doing DNA testing that way. I just like this whole thing is neat.

I do love that
Ancestry.com gives you hints including other people's family trees. It's a fast way of adding to your tree. Because sometimes someone else's family tree includs are the siblings of the person you are searching.

Right now I'm on the hunt for a Hawaiian will of my Great Grandfather. He owned a 1000 acres cattle ranch in Kona and died in 1959 at the age of 88. I did learn I need a lot of money for retirement. Because the average age in my family tree is late 80s early 90s.
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Old July 1st, 2012, 05:28 AM
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Kat, Thanks for the comments. Your story is interesting also. Who knows you may have an estate in Kona awaiting you. Wouldn't that be nice. Hawaii is spectacular and one of my favorite places.
I mentioned the village where I grew up. Not too many years ago they did a story in my hometown newspaper about it. They interviewed my cousins and another woman who is not a relative but grew up there also. It brought back many great memories of my childhood. Recently on FB I found another friend that grew up in the village too also not a resident. She lives in Florida now also. We plan to meet someday soon.

Laura
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Old July 1st, 2012, 10:25 AM
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The woman I worked with was Kathy DiNardi .She would be in her 50's or early 60's now .
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Old July 1st, 2012, 11:48 AM
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My ancestor came to the US from the Rhine valley as an indentured servant in his early teens. He landed in Philadelphia on Oct. 22, 1754.
Not too surprisingly, he married the farmer's daughter. There are traces of the family back to the 15th century in the Rhine valley under the name Buehl.

As far as I can tell, no one in my family tree was ever rich or famous, but they all did what they did. What more could one ask?
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