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Old March 10th, 2006, 10:47 AM
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Default Chops on formal night

If one is to skip out on formal night and has reservations at Chops, what is the suggested dress?
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Old March 10th, 2006, 10:57 AM
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If I remember, Chops and Portofino are still considered to be semi-formal to formal. I have always worn a suit or tuxedo when dining at these locations.
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Old March 10th, 2006, 11:01 AM
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Chops and Portofino are Smart Casual on regular nights and on Formal nights, it's Formal also. Maybe dine in the Windjammer if you don't want to dress up. Enjoy!!
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Old March 10th, 2006, 11:42 PM
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Banshee,

If one is to skip out on formal night and has reservations at Chops, what is the suggested dress?

Specialty restaurants generally require at least the same dress as the main dining room. On some ships, they require a higher standard of dress than the main dining rooms -- especially on "casual" evenings.

That said, why on earth would you want to skip out of the main dining room on the formal evenings? The formal evenings always feature the best menus -- lobster tails, Alaska king crab legs, roast pheasant, tournedos of beef tenderloin, fillet mignon, beef wellington, etc., depending upon the line.

Don't be a party pooper. Hire & don the "monkey suit" so you can savor the best dinners that the dining room will serve throughout the entire voyage!

Norm.

P. S.: If you rent formalwear through the cruise line, you don't have to pack it at all. The cruise line will deliver it to your cabin on embarkation day and you just leave it there at the end of the cruise. It does not get any easier!
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Old March 11th, 2006, 07:26 AM
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Norm, to be quite honest with you, in the position we are in right now, we just don't think it's worth the money. We are both young and our expendable income is very limited. With a mortgage, 2 car payments, daycare for 3 children, etc...we are not exactly swimming in extra cash. 2 years ago we decided we wanted to do something "special" for our 10 year anniversary. After many discussion we decided on a cruise. More my wifes idea than mine, but I slowly came around to the idea. Anyway, we've saved up enough money for the cruise, the flights, pre/post cruise stay, excursions, and spending money. While we plan on having a great time for the week we are gone, and for once in our lives we don't really plan on watching what we spend. However, that being said, 200-300 (or more) to rent a tux and buy a formal dress seems a little much. That same amount could feed my family for a couple weeks. I'm not going to say anything about what I actually think about the guidelines for dress on formal night. Been there done that and we just don't need to go there again.

We probably will not be attending formal night. Not because we don't want to, but because we really feel the money could be spent better inother ways, either by making the over all experience better for us or spending it on our family.

Thanks,
Jay
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Old March 11th, 2006, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Banshee
However, that being said, 200-300 (or more) to rent a tux and buy a formal dress seems a little much. That same amount could feed my family for a couple weeks. I'm not going to say anything about what I actually think about the guidelines for dress on formal night. Been there done that and we just don't need to go there again.

We probably will not be attending formal night. Not because we don't want to, but because we really feel the money could be spent better inother ways, either by making the over all experience better for us or spending it on our family.

Thanks,
Jay
Honestly, it doesn't have to cost 200-300. For you, I would have you wear a dark suit, shirt and tie. If you don't have a suit, even a dark pair of slacks, shirt, tie and sport jacket would be fine. If you currently don't have one, check out goodwill,etc. You can even ask a friend if you could borrow theirs. Wife doesn't need an expensive formal. I got 2, one at goodwill, one at a consignment shop, and spent less than 30.00 on both. She could even wear just a nice dress, doesn't have to be cocktail dress/evening gown. Just a nice church going dress would be fine. Walmart, Kmart, etc all have nice dresses or skirts that she could wear.

Don't stress over being the best dressed. But don't miss the formal dinner (yumm!) because of the cost of dressing up.
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Old March 11th, 2006, 10:21 AM
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Banshee,
I remember those days. Our first cruise was for our 10th also and I borrowed 2 dresses from a friend. I agree with Mom1977!!! Don't stress over the dress!! I got 2 gowns and a cocktail dress at Ross for $20 each. My son went to Savers (used clothing) and bought 2 Brooks Brothers suits for job interviews. He paid $12 each!! A black pair of docker/slacks, dark long sleeve shirt and tie will be fine too. Many men take their jackets off anyway. Go and enjoy!
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Old March 11th, 2006, 04:07 PM
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We also know how you feel being on a tight budget. And we too are going on our first ever cruise this summer for our 10th anniversary. However (my husband being a jeans and tshirt kinda guy) is actually excited about getting dressed up. Whooo Hooo! Tux's and gowns aren't as expensive as you might think if you look around for the best deal. We found a tux, shirt w/tie and bumberbund, 2 vests w/matching ties all for $150 at burlington coat factory. All I have to do is hem his pants at the appropriate length. I also found a gown for myself for $25 at pennys outlet, they also had cocktail dresses, nice pantsuits etc, all around the same $ value. Look also to the future, is there any upcomming occasions that you could wear these kind of things again? My daughter is going to get married this year, and Dad's tux will be perfect for that too. So it was a dual duty investment for us. Or perhaps if someone you know can sew well, as far as dresses etc anyway, make it your self and save money there?

If you are taking this cruise and want it to be special for your anniversary, don't restrict yourself, and deny yourself the formal nights. Especially if your anniversary happens to fall on one of those nights.

Make this a cruise to remember! Relax, and enjoy the ride!

Jane
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Old March 11th, 2006, 08:17 PM
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If you miss dinning in the regular dinning room on formal nights you are missing a lot of good food and service.

If you can't afford to rent a Tux, fine! Any & every man should own at least one dark suit, or better yet, a Blue/Black Blazer with white dress shirt tie and gray trousers and black or brown dress shoes.

The Blazer outfit will surfice for most if not all occassions where you need to dress up. I wonder how anyone can go through life as an adult, without a least one suit or Blazer. You'll need them for job interviews, funerals and other dress up occasions.

As some have suggested, there are many sources for finding such items used.
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Old March 11th, 2006, 10:50 PM
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Jay,

However, that being said, 200-300 (or more) to rent a tux and buy a formal dress seems a little much.

I think that you are grossly overestimating the cost of dressing for a formal night.

>> Your wife probably has a nice dress that she bought for a recent wedding, anniversary party, or other special occasion. It would be quite acceptable.

>> If you have a dark business suit, you can wear it rather than renting formalwear.

To miss out on formal nights -- and there usually are two of them -- is to miss ot on major highlight of the cruise. You also may well find that your entertainment optoins are fairly limited on the formal evenings if you don't have the appropriate formalwear. Although many cruise lines now offer a casual dining alternative in the buffet restaurant, they also state quite clearly that the prescribed evening attire is expected everywhere else -- which means in the showroom(s), in the casino, and in all of the lounges that offer entertainment.

If you and your wife really, really feel that you cannot participate in formal night, your best alternative would be to take your cruise on a line that does not hold formal evenings -- and there are several.

>> In the "mainstream" segment of the market, Norwegian Cruise Line's new "freestyle cruising" program has replaced "formal" evenings with "formal optional" evenings -- meaning that formal attire is optional for those who wish to wear it.

>> In the "premium" segment of the market, Oceana Cruises offers an all casual product. There are no formal evenings at all on any of Oceana's ships.

>> Disney Cruise Line is all casual, though it might be a bit more expensive than some others.

>> Windjammer Barefoot Cruises is as casual as the name implies. Shorts and "T": shirts are acceptable even at dinner.

>> Several of the lines that operate coastal cruises with smaller vessels, like American Canadian Caribbean Line and Cruise West, also offer "all casual" cruises.

Pehaps you and your wife would prefer one of these options to excluding yourselves from a couple major highlights of a more traditional cruise.

Anyway, enjoy whatever cruise you choose!

Norm.
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Old March 15th, 2006, 09:38 AM
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Jay,

First of all, don't stress over what you wear to eat. other than the minority here who seem to think that wearing a "monkey suit" is fun and needs to be done by all it isn't that big a deal to most. Kind of funny that the ones who like to wear such folderol give it such a condescending name!, but I digress.

If dressing up isn't in your top 100 of fun things to do, you definitely won't "miss out" on anything. Most of the ones that do dress up to eat, rush right back to the cabin when they are done to change back into jeans and shorts for the rest of the evening. So have no fears over nothing to do after dinner if you're not wearing your "monkey suit".

This applies to all of the mainstream lines. As to missing out on the best food, well I'll leave that up to your taste buds.

For the most part my partner and I avoid the bother of the dining room anyway, and haven't taken formalwear for the last 5 cruises.

Just remember, there are millions of people who take cruises, and only about .00001 percent of them look at this message board, and even less of those post messages.

From the "monkey suit" lovers you will get comments that you MUST dress up and be like them. From the ones who don't like to play dress up, you'll get the opposite comments.

Be yourself, and you will have no worries, just enjoy and relax.

Cheers,
Peter
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Old March 15th, 2006, 11:35 AM
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Nice post, Peter. Life would be so much better if everyone minded their own business.

Ever since reaching 21, I don't feel that others (except for my wife) have the right to tell me how I should dress.

Live and let live!
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Old March 15th, 2006, 01:50 PM
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PeterV,

First of all, don't stress over what you wear to eat. other than the minority here who seem to think that wearing a "monkey suit" is fun and needs to be done by all it isn't that big a deal to most.

I'm not persauded that those of us who like to dress up really are a minority.

That said, social etiquette absolutely requires that the guests at an event wear the dress prescribed by the host. In this case, the host is the cruise line.

If dressing up isn't in your top 100 of fun things to do, you definitely won't "miss out" on anything. Most of the ones that do dress up to eat, rush right back to the cabin when they are done to change back into jeans and shorts for the rest of the evening. So have no fears over nothing to do after dinner if you're not wearing your "monkey suit".

If "dressing up isn't in your top 100 of fun things to do," you have a choice. You can book a cruise on any of several lines that do not hold formal evenings, or you can book a vacation at a land resort, where, in either case, nobody will expect you to dress up.

Whether you like the fact or not, the manner in which people dress is part of what sets the atmosphere for a "formal" or "semiformal" or "informal" or "casual" evening. When I purchase a cruise that includes two or three formal evenings, I am paying for the experience of those formal evenings and the cruise line is contractually committed to providing them -- not for a bunch ingnorant buffoons to destroy the formal atmosphere by showing up in attire that's socially unacceptable for such an event.

I'm really astounded by the arrogance of people who think that they have some right to do as they please, with no regard for others. If you do not own the ship, you have an obligation to conform to the parameters set by the company that does own the ship -- and that includes conforming to the prescribed standards of dress. If you don't like those standards of dress, do yourself and everybody else a big favor by going elsewhere.

Norm.
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Old March 15th, 2006, 01:55 PM
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Paul,

Ever since reaching 21, I don't feel that others (except for my wife) have the right to tell me how I should dress.

That statement is perhaps the most unfortunate reflection on your parents that I could imagine. I'm sorry that they did not teach you the most basic principle of social etiquette that it is the right of the host or hostess (in this case, the cruise line) to stipulate the appropriate attire for a social function and the obligation of all guests to conform.

Norm.
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Old March 15th, 2006, 02:30 PM
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Thanks Peter and Paul (is there a Mary?), good advice. I've decided not to worry about it. I may dress up a bit but am not going to run out and buy a tux or new formal wear. I tis my vacation and I agree with you that the majority of the people aren't going to really care about what I am wearing. If they do, thats their problem, not mine.

Live and let live.


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Old March 15th, 2006, 02:53 PM
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oh lordy here we go again!!! let's keep to the topic people.
To answer your question, the dress code for Chops on formal night is formal attire, ifyou choose to dine at this restaurant you are expected to dress properly.

FYI - in my observations and from other posters on these and other boards it seems that the VAST MAJORITY of cruise passengers choose to conform to the cruise lines dress code.
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Old March 15th, 2006, 05:09 PM
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As the others have said, don't miss out on the fun of formal night, especially on your anniversary. A tux and long formal gown are not necessary. My husband does not even own a suit, he wore a black jacket, charcoal gray slacks, white shirt and dark tie (on RCCL) and fit in just fine. I wore cocktail length dresses purchased for under $40.00 at J C Penney and Wet Seal. Some people were dressed fancier, some were dressed less formally than we were, but most were dressed similarly. Most cruise lines specifically state that dark suits and cocktail length dresses are acceptable attire for formal nights.
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Old March 15th, 2006, 07:44 PM
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I do have a question for those of you who are members of the clothes police.

Does it really ruin your cruise or make you ill if you see someone not in the suggested attire in the dining room? If so, you have my sympathy.

I hope that you also adhere to the rest of the cruise line rules and do not smuggle any liquor on to the ship. That would be naughty!
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Old March 15th, 2006, 10:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul B
I do have a question for those of you who are members of the clothes police.

Does it really ruin your cruise or make you ill if you see someone not in the suggested attire in the dining room? If so, you have my sympathy.

I hope that you also adhere to the rest of the cruise line rules and do not smuggle any liquor on to the ship. That would be naughty!
It doesn't ruin my cruise; however, I do respect people who obey the rules and respect their fellow dinning mates by dressing as requested by the host.

I don't know of any rules that prohibit bringing your favorite beverage on board, on the Princess line. I do not bring anything on board myself, as the room service prices on my choices are better then I can get at home. I
always try to abide by the rules.
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Old March 16th, 2006, 01:02 PM
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I'm not persauded that those of us who like to dress up really are a minority.

I didn't say that the people who like to dress up are a minority, I said that people who care what others wear and want others to dress up are a minority.

That said, social etiquette absolutely requires that the guests at an event wear the dress prescribed by the host. In this case, the host is the cruise line

I need to stress this, We are not guests at an event, and the cruise line is hosting nothing.

If "dressing up isn't in your top 100 of fun things to do," you have a choice. You can book a cruise on any of several lines that do not hold formal evenings, or you can book a vacation at a land resort, where, in either case, nobody will expect you to dress up.

As stated before, no one really cares what other people wear other than a small minority. I will contine to book holidays just as I am doing, because I like to do them. Formal night ARE optional if you hadn't noticed.

I am paying for the experience of those formal evenings and the cruise line is contractually committed to providing them

I must admit I have looked over the contract of passage, and really see nothing that applies to required attire at dinner. If there was, I'm sure the cruiselines would be using it quite a lot to make even more money on contractual failures.

I'm really astounded by the arrogance of people who think that they have some right to do as they please, with no regard for others. If you do not own the ship, you have an obligation to conform to the parameters set by the company that does own the ship -- and that includes conforming to the prescribed standards of dress. If you don't like those standards of dress, do yourself and everybody else a big favor by going elsewhere.

I'm often astounded at the arrogance of people who think they have some right to make other people do as they wish. As to the cruiseline, I doubt they care about it in the slightest.

That statement is perhaps the most unfortunate reflection on your parents that I could imagine. I'm sorry that they did not teach you the most basic principle of social etiquette that it is the right of the host or hostess (in this case, the cruise line) to stipulate the appropriate attire for a social function and the obligation of all guests to conform.

I hate to tell you this, but if you hadn't noticed, most people really don't care about dress codes anymore, times change, move on, they serve no useful purpose whatsoever, other than those few who like to play dress up. I still haven't quite figured out what makes dressing up for a couple of hours fun? Anyone?

As the others have said, don't miss out on the fun of formal night, especially on your anniversary.

I think it is fun only if you like to do it, as the OP wasn't looking forward to it, I doubt he would "miss the fun".

Anyway, these comments, on either side, will change no ones mind, but sooner or later, formal nights will die an abrupt death.

I just always find it so amusing that there is such venom expressed by those that dress up against those that do not, and usually not the other way around. It is very reflective of a small minority of people who want to control what OTHER PEOPLE DO, easily expressed as "I don't like X, and because I don't you can't do it either."

Cheers,
Peter
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Old March 16th, 2006, 03:25 PM
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Peter,

I need to stress this, We are not guests at an event, and the cruise line is hosting nothing.

To the contrary, the crusse line is a "host" in the same sense that a restaurant or a theater or a nightclub is a "host" -- and it has the same right not only to prescribe, but also to enforce, standards of dress. Although many restaurants and other social venues have abandoned dress codes as our society has become more casual in recent decades, the fact remains that some upscale restaurants still maintain and enforce them. The fact that they are "places of public accommodation" within the law does not require them to accept patrons who do not conform to their standards of dress.

As stated before, no one really cares what other people wear other than a small minority.

As I said before, I'm not persuaded that it is only the small minority that you assert. Statistically, less than ten percent of the people who are upset about something will bother to voice their discontent. If even five percent tother to comment, you can be certain that majority are upset.

I will contine to book holidays just as I am doing, because I like to do them.

If you like to prove the failure of your parents to teach you social etiquette, I can't stop you -- but know that it's what you prove when you don't conform to the ship's standards of dress.

I must admit I have looked over the contract of passage, and really see nothing that applies to required attire at dinner.

Then you did not read it very carefully. Failure to follow the prescribed standards of dress legally falls within "inappropriate conduct" (or some similar wording) in the contract of passage of every major cruise line.

If there was, I'm sure the cruiselines would be using it quite a lot to make even more money on contractual failures.

Enforcement of dress standards varies pretty widely. On Celebrity Cruises, for example, you probably won't get into either the dining room or the theater on formal nights if you are not wearing at least a coat and tie.

That said, all of the major cruise lines usually apply the msost severe remedies permitted by the contract of passage (confinement to cabin until termination of voyage in the next port of call plus cancellation or refusal of future bookings) only in the most eggregious cases because they actually make more in onboard revenue (bar sales, shops, spa treatments, art auctions, bingo and casino, classes, computer services, shore excursions, photos, charges for dining in specialty restaurants, etc.) than in cruise fares. It's surprising how quickly those items can add up to massive bills! Try giving a hard time to a member of the crew who tells you that you ened appropriate attire to enter the dining room, though, and see what happens!

As to the cruiseline, I doubt they care about it in the slightest.

When passengers complain in signficant numbers, you can be sure that they care because repeat business is at stake.

Well, Carnival Corporation might not, but P&O Princess certainly did and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. still does! Then again, the sense that Carnival Corporation (NYSE: CCL) cares about customer satisfaction about as much as General Motors is the very reason why I don't own the stock....

I hate to tell you this, but if you hadn't noticed, most people really don't care about dress codes anymore, times change, move on, they serve no useful purpose whatsoever, other than those few who like to play dress up. I still haven't quite figured out what makes dressing up for a couple of hours fun? Anyone?

It's called "elegance" -- and it's something that you obviously do not appreciate, which is okay. Some of us do appreciate elegance, and there are enough cruise lines in this world, with different styles and personalities, to accommodate those who do and those who don't.

Anyway, these comments, on either side, will change no ones mind...

Probably true, but they do raise conscieousness of the existence of the other side for those who are not aware.

... but sooner or later, formal nights will die an abrupt death.

Perhaps on some lines. Hey, Norwegian Cruise Line now officially holds "formal optional" evenings rather than "formal" evenings and some cruise lines, like Oceana (resort casual) and Windjammer (beach casual), don't hold formal nights at all. Perhaps you would feel quite at home there.

OTOH, Celebrity obviously is attracting a lot of people who like to dress up -- so much so that the line not only still holds "informal" evenings (sport coat required for gentlemen), but many passengers dress well beyond the "informal" standard on those evenings.

I just always find it so amusing that there is such venom expressed by those that dress up against those that do not, and usually not the other way around. It is very reflective of a small minority of people who want to control what OTHER PEOPLE DO, easily expressed as "I don't like X, and because I don't you can't do it either."

It seems quite reasonable to expect that civilized people will follow well-established norms of social conduct. The fact that many people find those who don't to be disgusting should be no surprise.

This is not a question of anybody dictating that "You must to X." Rather, it is a question of those who [i]freely choose to go where X is clearly expected[i] and the fail to do X while there. If you don't want to do X, that is perfectly fine if you don't go where X is clearly expected.

BTW, I actually have considerable patience with "first timers" who don't undertand that "formal" properly means "black tie" (or perhaps whose travel agents misinformed them), and thus show up in the dining room on formal night in a sport coat and tie. By one's second or third cruise, though, I do think that should know better.

Norm.
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Old March 16th, 2006, 03:38 PM
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It seems quite reasonable to expect that civilized people will follow well-established norms of social conduct. The fact that many people find those who don't to be disgusting should be no surprise.


WHAT!?! C'mon, you can't be serious? Disgusting? Can we just close this thread. It seems obvious that there are two groups of people here and neither one of them is willing to budge. I can see valid points on each side but it all comes down to personal preference.

I don't agree with the uppity, arrogance of SOME who want to be dressed up, but I can understand why they do it. I also don't agree with those who dress down out of spite.

I guess I just don't see the big deal here. If you want to dress up...dress up. If you aren't comfortable, don't do it. Is it really that hard? Judging someone by the way they dress is just ridiculous. What? Are we back in middle school?
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Old March 16th, 2006, 07:42 PM
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Banshee,

WHAT!?! C'mon, you can't be serious? Disgusting?

Okay, perhaps I'm not the world's greatest wordsmith. What term would you prefer for common reaction to antisocual behavior?

BTW, I should point out that it would bu every bit as gauche to book an "all casual" cruise aboard MV Nautica (Oceana Cruises), for example, and then to show up for dinner in a tuxedo or an evening gown. Social norms regarding compliance with dress standards do cut both ways. For some reason, though, people don't seem to do that sort of thing.

I can see valid points on each side but it all comes down to personal preference.

More precisely, it all comes down to making decisions that are consistent with one's personal preference.

I have no problem whatsoever with the idea of an all-casual cruise -- and there are several lines that do offer them. I also have no problem with (and indeed do enjoy) formal (and, on lines that still have them, semiformal or informal) evenings. The conflict arises when some yahoo books a cruise on a line that expects people to dress up for the evening's entertainment and then refuses to do so.

If enough people start booking "casual only" cruises, one of two things will happen. Either (1) some of the lines that are losing the most customers who want "casual only" cruises will change their product to "casual only" to reclaim those customers or (2) the lines that offer "casual only" cruises will grow faster than the others -- and it's entirely likely that we'll see some of both. In either case, the result will be more "casual only" ships offering more "casual only" itineraries to meet the demand.

I guess I just don't see the big deal here. If you want to dress up...dress up. If you aren't comfortable, don't do it. Is it really that hard? Judging someone by the way they dress is just ridiculous. What? Are we back in middle school?

Nobody here is judging people by the way that they dress. Rather, the judgement falls upon the action of failing to do what one signs up to do -- which, in this case, happens to be dressing in the proper manner for an event that one feely chose to book.

Do you see the difference?

OTOH, whether any of us like the fact or not, the manner in which we dress and groom ourselves is the very first statement that we make about who and what we are to people who are meeting us for the very first time.

Norm.
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Old March 17th, 2006, 05:14 AM
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To the contrary, the crusse line is a "host" in the same sense that a restaurant or a theater or a nightclub is a "host" -- and it has the same right not only to prescribe, but also to enforce, standards of dress.

If you want to think that cruise lines, theatres restaurants and nightclubs are hosts, feel free, I do not.

Host (n): a person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there.

Guest (n): a visitor to whom hospitality is extended

While the cruiseline may be responsible for us while on board, we are not invited guests.

I tend to think of Formal Night in the same way that I think of other "Nights" 50's, Sock Hop, Country Western Toga etc. One of the many activities that are planned for those who wish to partake.

When passengers complain in signficant numbers, you can be sure that they care because repeat business is at stake.

Just proves my point, no significant numbers complain, hence the lackadaisical approach to dress codes on a ship.

It seems quite reasonable to expect that civilized people will follow well-established norms of social conduct. The fact that many people find those who don't to be disgusting should be no surprise.

Ah yes, there is the venom, well played!

Just a final comment on the matter. In all of history there have been those who reject the societal norms and hence cause change. People such as yourself are traditionalists, who follow the norm because it is the norm.

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Old March 17th, 2006, 11:43 PM
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PeterV,

If you want to think that cruise lines, theatres restaurants and nightclubs are hosts, feel free, I do not.

Host (n): a person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there.

Guest (n): a visitor to whom hospitality is extended


Try checking a real dictionary.

host n... 1. a. one that receives or entertains guests socially, commercially, or officially. b. one that provides facilities for an event or function...

guest n... 1.... c. a person who pays for the services of an establishment (as a hotel or restaurant)...

Source of Definitions: Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, G. C. Merriam Company, Springfield, MA, 1973.

It appears that the cruise line meets the definition of a host and the passengers embarked in a cruise ship meet the definition of guests. You can't argue that these definitions are somehow novel, either, since my dictionary is over thirty years old.

I tend to think of Formal Night in the same way that I think of other "Nights" 50's, Sock Hop, Country Western Toga etc. One of the many activities that are planned for those who wish to partake.

1. From a standpoint of social etiquette, it's extremely gauche to decline an invitation from the master of a vessel in which one is embarked. Such events include the Captain's cocktail receptoins and the gatherings for repeat passengers, which invariably are part of formal nights.

2. On some ships, a decision not to dress for formal evenings does not leave very many options. One typically can choose between alternative casual dining in the buffet area and room service, but one's options for entertainment may well be limited to a dozen or so channels on the television in one's cabin depending upon the policies of the line.

Just proves my point, no significant numbers complain, hence the lackadaisical approach to dress codes on a ship.

The degree of complaints and the strictness of enforcement actually vary substantially between cruise lines. The more "upscale" cruise lines tend to enforce dress standards pretty strictly because many of their passengers will complain quite vocally if they don't.

Just a final comment on the matter. In all of history there have been those who reject the societal norms and hence cause change. People such as yourself are traditionalists, who follow the norm because it is the norm.

Many cruise lines are still trying to accommodate everybody -- those who want strict formal nights and those who want nothing to do whith formal nights -- on the same ship, but such misguided efforts really do not satisfy either group. I'm really surprised that at least one or two of the "mass market" lines have not changed to "all casual" crusing with absolutely no formal, semiformal, or informal evenings.
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Old March 18th, 2006, 06:41 AM
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Why are we still discussing this? What exactly is the point? Nobody is changing anyones mind and you are going around in circles. Be adults. Respect all and appreciate each for the individuals that they are.
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Old April 10th, 2006, 10:36 PM
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YOU WILL BE FINE IN CASUAL DRESSY......BUT YOU BETTER MAKE RESERVATIONS AS SOON AS YOU CAN.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 01:37 PM
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