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colorcrazie June 26th, 2006 01:29 PM

Dress Code Factor
 
This is something that I have not seen addressed yet and thought maybe it should be.

The longer the cruise, the more expensive it is. And people who work and/or have kids frequently can't do more than 7 days at most. In my experience, if a cruise is longer than 10 days, the passenger mix tends more toward older and more upscale. The two together mean dressier attire, especially at dinner. Just FYI to anyone. It's not just the cruise line. A 16 day HAL cruise is different than a 7 day HAL cruise (loved 'em both). And, a 3 day Carnival, for example, is entirely different than either.

We also seem to only talk about certain cruise lines...Celebrity vs. Oceania, for example. There are a lot more lines where things are fuzzier re. standards of attire. And, every cruise is different. Having lived most of my adult life in either Florida or L.A., I have frequently done the same cruie line, same ship, same itinerary multiple times. And, one time the passenger mix would tend toward quiet and well dressed, the next would be the bucket of beer crowd who don't think anyone should wear anything besides jeans and baseball hats. At least they were required to take those caps off for dinner! I stopped doing weekend getaways via 3 day cruises because of the rowdy groups that often tend to book those. They are more than welcome in my book to enjoy themselves. I just don't want to go along.
Marty

mehawk June 26th, 2006 02:43 PM

We think we can understand about the rowdy 3 day cruises. Haven't done it but we wouldn't consider it.

dina June 26th, 2006 02:51 PM

I think anytime you can get on a cruise ship would be great. I like different crowds so it doesn't make that much of a difference to me.

colorcrazie June 26th, 2006 03:40 PM

Dina,
I have to admit that it is age and illness that changed my attitude. Used to love to party, just can't do it now. And, I just find quieter cruises more to my liking now that I'm older. I have some mobility and balance problems and have been literally knocked off my feet by party hearty types. But, I sure don't begrudge them their fun!
Marty

dina June 26th, 2006 03:47 PM

Marty,

Yep.. I can understand that. I'm new to cruising so any time I can get on a ship just makes me very happy. hahahaha

Some friends of mine enjoy quiet cruises with lots of days at sea. I perfer the opposite but I sure wouldn't turn away any opportunity to get on board again. :D

LisaK June 27th, 2006 11:02 AM

Marty you are exactly right. There is a dynamic for each cruise line, each voyage and sometimes each ship. It isn't cookie-cutter by anymeans. What is considered acceptable attire on one line would not be on another line. That is why these boards are so helpful.

balabusta June 28th, 2006 02:43 PM

I find that when you take a cruise when children are in school there tends to be an older crowd on the ship. Yes, I also agree that when a cruise is for more than seven days, it eliminates a lot of people who can't take that much time off of work. As for cruise lines; from what I have heard, the most upscale ones are Silversea, Crystal and Radisson, where you would tend to find a more formal crowd. If you are into gourmet dining, in the mid price cruise lines, Celebrity has the best food because of it's world renowned chef, Michael Roux. As far as activities, I find that there is more to do on Royal Caribbean. We book on mid price cruise lines as I would rather spend the money to shop or go on excursions in the different ports. I have found that you find every type of passanger on the mid price cruise lines and people tend to mix with people that have similar life styles.

Rev22:17 June 28th, 2006 06:37 PM

Marty,

Quote:

Originally Posted by You
The longer the cruise, the more expensive it is. And people who work and/or have kids frequently can't do more than 7 days at most. In my experience, if a cruise is longer than 10 days, the passenger mix tends more toward older and more upscale. The two together mean dressier attire, especially at dinner. Just FYI to anyone. It's not just the cruise line. A 16 day HAL cruise is different than a 7 day HAL cruise (loved 'em both). And, a 3 day Carnival, for example, is entirely different than either.

In general, you also will find a lot more families with school-age children aboard ship during school vacation periods (from the middle of February to the end of April, June through August, and the weeks of Thanksgiving, Ghristmas, and New Year's Day) than at other times of the year.

That said, these are all general trends but there are notable exceptions.

>> There were over two hundred children aboard the original MV Royal Princess (45,000 tons, 1200 passengers) during my twelve night cruise to "Scandanavia and Western Europe" in June of 2001 -- and that ship did not have a children's center!

>> I also encountered a LOT of children aboard a Pricness cruise to the Mexican Fiviera in the October-November time frame, probably in 2002. Inquiring, I learned that many schools in southern California now operate on a staggered calendar in which the students go to school for two quarters and then have one quarter of vacation, so that one third of each school is on vacation in each quarter. Operating from Los Angeles, the cruise was very convenient for people who lived in the area that followed this school schedule.

>> There were also quite a few children aboard MV Galacy for the fourteen night crossing from Civitavecchia to Galveston last October. The Teen Disco was quite busy every night.

The bottom line is that there are no guarantees.

That said, I have also noticed that children on the "priemium" lines, like Princess and Celebrity, tend to be very well behaved and not disruptive.

And Carnival's longstanding reputation, whether true or not today, is that some of the adults are even more disruptive than the children....

Norm.

Rev22:17 June 28th, 2006 06:50 PM

balabusta,

Quote:

Originally Posted by You
As for cruise lines; from what I have heard, the most upscale ones are Silversea, Crystal and Radisson, where you would tend to find a more formal crowd.

These lines have superb reputations, but the price of a cruise on any of these "luxury" lines will fetch two cruises of equal duration (or one much longer cruise) on "premium" lines like Princess, Disney, and Celebrity.

Quote:

Originally Posted by You
If you are into gourmet dining, in the mid price cruise lines, Celebrity has the best food because of it's world renowned chef, Michael Roux.

Food is very much a matter of personal taste. Celebrity's cuisine is certainly very good, but many passengers find that it grows old quickly because the menus are very similar. On a seven night Celebrity cruise, you can plan on French, First Formal,French, French, French, Last Formal, and French cuisine and the formal menus also have a strong French flair. I prefer Princess's variety of cuisine, which typically features American (Sailaway), First Formal, Italian, French, Chef's Choice, Last Formal, and American (Landfall) menus for the same seven nights. I have never felt that the food was in any way substandard, either in quality of ingredients or in preparation, on either line. Several factors that prompted my decision to shift from Princess to Celebrity, but food was not one of them.

Norm.

Adence59 November 15th, 2006 03:29 AM

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momofmeg November 25th, 2006 02:18 PM

Re: Dress Code Factor
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by colorcrazie
This is something that I have not seen addressed yet and thought maybe it should be.

The longer the cruise, the more expensive it is. And people who work and/or have kids frequently can't do more than 7 days at most. In my experience, if a cruise is longer than 10 days, the passenger mix tends more toward older and more upscale. The two together mean dressier attire, especially at dinner. Just FYI to anyone. It's not just the cruise line. A 16 day HAL cruise is different than a 7 day HAL cruise (loved 'em both). And, a 3 day Carnival, for example, is entirely different than either.

We also seem to only talk about certain cruise lines...Celebrity vs. Oceania, for example. There are a lot more lines where things are fuzzier re. standards of attire. And, every cruise is different. Having lived most of my adult life in either Florida or L.A., I have frequently done the same cruie line, same ship, same itinerary multiple times. And, one time the passenger mix would tend toward quiet and well dressed, the next would be the bucket of beer crowd who don't think anyone should wear anything besides jeans and baseball hats. At least they were required to take those caps off for dinner! I stopped doing weekend getaways via 3 day cruises because of the rowdy groups that often tend to book those. They are more than welcome in my book to enjoy themselves. I just don't want to go along.
Marty

You are entirely correct Marty and for the reasons you mentioned we don't don't do the 3 day wkend cruises either.

Ron n Jon December 11th, 2006 12:25 PM

We think that the cruise line industry is on a course of self-destruct. To fill their vessels they have not only lowered their prices, (and their culinary and service standards) they have abandoned or refuse to enforce their rules on smoking, their rules on dress code and their rules in queuing up to take one’s turn. These cut-rate cruises of today have become a free for all and I would hate to see the results of such corporate lack of discipline and leadership when a ship ever became in danger.

We have given up the Caribbean altogether. Before we are branded snobs, let it be said that there is a snobbery that has taken over the activities of these sailings that is called reverse snobbery. Passenger can now be seen walking about the Atrium on formal night dressed in shorts, dirty t-shirt, ball cap on backwards bearing a bottle of beer in hand. The sneer on their faces clearly says they despise those who choose to dress for dinner. Their stance is that they consider themselves just as good a passenger as those formally dressed passengers. Well, up to that point of their entry into the Atrium, dressed deliberately to shock, they were just as good. But then their actions clearly make them out to be the snobs that they really are.

Rev22:17 December 12th, 2006 03:49 AM

Ron n Jon,

Quote:

Originally Posted by You
We think that the cruise line industry is on a course of self-destruct. To fill their vessels they have not only lowered their prices, (and their culinary and service standards) they have abandoned or refuse to enforce their rules on smoking, their rules on dress code and their rules in queuing up to take one’s turn. These cut-rate cruises of today have become a free for all and I would hate to see the results of such corporate lack of discipline and leadership when a ship ever became in danger.

I think that you are painting with an overly broad brush when you refer to "the cruise line industry" as though all cruise lines are the same. There have always been various tiers in the cruise industry, traditionally characterized as "budget," "mainstream," "premium," and "luxury," just as you find similar tiers in the hotel industry (one does not equate a Days Inn with a Fairmont Princess Hotel). Historically, these tiers were characteristic of the strictness of "formal" evenings, the fanciness of the line's cuisine, and the level of service that one would expect. I don't see a change in that basic structure, though some lines clearly have moved "downscale" -- perhaps a whole tier in some cases -- in the market.

What has changed, though, is the demographics of the passengers. Years ago, most passengers had a strong sense of social etiquette and those who didn't were so few in number that they usually complied with dress codes and such as soon as they realized how badly their failure to comply stood out. Now, there are passengers who simply don't care that they stand out in a negative way. Social etiquette would say that the host(ess) should not have to enforce a dress code because the guests should comply with it without enforcement, so one can forgive the fact that the cruise lines were slow to respond to the new situation. Nonetheless, the response to Kuki's question on enforcement of dress codes on the Royal Caribbean board was both clear and nearly unanimous in favor of strict enforcement of dress codes, regardless of what the dress codes are. I do hope that the cruise lines are listening!

Quote:

Originally Posted by You
We have given up the Caribbean altogether. Before we are branded snobs, let it be said that there is a snobbery that has taken over the activities of these sailings that is called reverse snobbery. Passenger can now be seen walking about the Atrium on formal night dressed in shorts, dirty t-shirt, ball cap on backwards bearing a bottle of beer in hand. The sneer on their faces clearly says they despise those who choose to dress for dinner. Their stance is that they consider themselves just as good a passenger as those formally dressed passengers. Well, up to that point of their entry into the Atrium, dressed deliberately to shock, they were just as good. But then their actions clearly make them out to be the snobs that they really are.

Good point, except that "snobs" is the wrong word to describe such arrogant boors.

Norm.


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