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  #1 (permalink)  
Old February 22nd, 2007, 10:18 AM
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Default Royal Caribbean Easter Cruise Dress code?

I am sooo confused. We are worried about the dress code...Does my stepdad have to wear a jacket to breakfaste, lunch and dinner??? I know jeans are not permitted, but what about nice shorts/shirt for my 12 year old and myself/Mom? I understand the formal night, but not the dress code the rest of the time...Please help, all stressed out. Thanks
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 11:16 AM
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take it easy, relax, don't stress over the dress code. The dress code for the day is casual, you can wear shorts in the dinning room for breakfast and lunch. Shorts are not to be worn in the dining room during dinner hours. Shorts are always fine for the buffet
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 02:12 PM
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hi
been on several rcl cruises,matter of fact have freedom of the seas for spring break.
jackets are required at dinner in the dining rm. my dad and husband brought ONE. They took it off as soon as they sat down.
you can wear shorts in the dining room for breakfast and lunch.
they are very relaxed with kids. on our last cruise, my 9 yr old,my 13 and 12 yr old nephews never wore a jacket at dinner. But they did wear a colared shirt. Even a golf type shirt was acceptable.
Even on the formal night the kids did not have to wear a jacket. It is not like the cruises of the old days. Very few folks had tuxes and gowns. A nice church type or cocktail attire was mostly seen on that night!
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 02:16 PM
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Default Re: Royal Caribbean Easter Cruise Dress code?

NT0712,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
I am sooo confused. We are worried about the dress code...Does my stepdad have to wear a jacket to breakfaste, lunch and dinner??? I know jeans are not permitted, but what about nice shorts/shirt for my 12 year old and myself/Mom? I understand the formal night, but not the dress code the rest of the time...Please help, all stressed out. Thanks
First, take a deep breath and relax. And another. And another.

You did not say on which line you are cruising, so I can't give you advice that's specific to your cruise. Thus, I'll provide general guidance that may be somewhat conservative, but that should be within the normative range of attire, and thus won't cause embarassment, on most lines. Your cruise line will provide a package of information after you submit your final payment, which you obviously should read and follow if it conflicts in any way with this information.

* For breakfast and lunch, daytime clothing (shorts, etc.) are acceptable everywhere (with the possible exception of a specialty restaurant that serves a fancy brunch for an extra charge on days at sea). I usually wear a polo or golf shirt, simply because it avoids the need to lug a bunch of "T" shirts that one can't wear to dinner. A polo shirt is certainly casual enough to wear to the beach or the pool over a bathing suit, or anywhere else that one might go, during the day.

* For dinner, the line will prescribe a standard of dress for each evening. On most cruise lines, this standard of dress extends to all public areas and events, with the exception of any "alternative casual" venues that the line may offer, for the entire evening (after 6:00 PM).

>> On "formal" evenings, which usually include the second evening and the next to last evening, gentlemen may wear either "black tie" (a dinner jacket outfit or a tuxedo) or a dark -- and I do mean DARK -- business suit and ladies wear either a full length dress or a cocktail dress. Most cruise lines hold a third "formal" evening near the middle of cruises of about ten nights or more. Your daughter can wear a junior bridesmaid's dress, if she has one from a recent wedding, or a "party dress" of the type that she would wear to a wedding or to some other special event at home.

>> Some cruise lines still hold "informal" or "semiformal" evenings in addition to the "formal" evenings. On such lines, you can expect that about half of the evenings will be "formal" and either "informal" or semiformal" (whichever the line chooses). A "semiformal" evening properly requires a business suit, though most lines will admit a sport coat or "blazer" worn with a tie, for gentlemen and a cocktail dress or a business suit for ladies. An "informal" evening requires a shirt with a collar (turtleneck is okay, but might be a bit warm for most cruise destinations), slacks, and a jacket for gents and a nice top with a skirt or slacks for ladies.

>> On "casual" evenings, gentlemen wear a shirt with a collar (polo shirt, golf shirt, etc.) and slacks (Dockers, Haggar, etc.) while ladies may wear a sun dress or a top with either a skirt or slacks. On cruise lines that still hold "semiformal" or "informal" evenings, about half of the evenings be "casual." On cruise lines that do not hold "semiformal" or "informal" evenings, the dress will be "casual" every evening except on the "formal" evenings.

>> On cruises in the tropics, most cruise lines hold a tropical deck party on one of the "casual" evenings. On this evening in particular, most gentlemen don a fancy "Hawai'ian" shirt and many ladies don dresses with similar vibrant prints.

I would also construe "no bluejeans" fairly broadly to exclude all items (skirts, vests, jackets, etc.) made of blue denim fabric.

Many cruise also offer some form of "casual" dinner for passengers who want not to dress up for "formal" and 'semiformal" or "informal" evenings, which may be either a buffet or a sit-down dinner with full table service (which may require a reservation and have a service charge). Nonetheless, I recommend strongly this option for three significant reasons.

>> 1. On many lines that offer "casual" dining, the options for "casual" entertainment are pretty limited. On some ships, the only option may be "pay per view" movies on your cabin's television that you could watch in a theater at home.

>> 2. The cruise lines really pull out all the stops on the "formal" evenings, when the dining rooms serve their best menus, often with extra touches and the entertainment department puts on the best shows. Many lines also hold very elegant special events on these evenings. Thus, those who "opt out" invariably miss some of the most wonderful and memorable experiences of the whole cruise.

>> 3. The elegance of the "formal" evenings is not part of the normal experience of most teenagers, so it's a fabulous opportunity for your daughter to broaden her horizons by experiencing and learning about this type of event.

Have a wonderful cruise!

Norm.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xcomet
jackets are required at dinner in the dining rm. my dad and husband brought ONE. They took it off as soon as they sat down.

they are very relaxed with kids. on our last cruise, my 9 yr old,my 13 and 12 yr old nephews never wore a jacket at dinner. But they did wear a colared shirt. Even a golf type shirt was acceptable.
Even on the formal night the kids did not have to wear a jacket. It is not like the cruises of the old days. Very few folks had tuxes and gowns. A nice church type or cocktail attire was mostly seen on that night!
Just because you weren't asked to leave the dining room does not mean it is alright for the kids to not dress up. Formal means formal.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 06:10 PM
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In trying to keep this a friendly place to communicate, i will just state it is obvious that you do not have small children or teens, which you have to find a jacket for! Most families cant afford to spend over one hundred dollars on a jacket for a child who will wear it once on a cruise. Perhaps the dining room ,are more interested in how appropriately the children behave, in their dress casual clothes ,than having them misbehaving in a suit!
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 06:29 PM
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Where do I even start here?
1. Since when are MOST families poor? That is a ridiculous generalization. You can afford to drag the kids on a cruise, but you can't afford $100 (most likely less if you're resourceful) to help teach your kids that there are societal norms and expectations that they should follow.

2. What would your kids wear if they had to go to a funeral? I sure hope a suit.

3. This has nothing to do with whether or not I have kids.

4. What your father and husband did is just as bad. My wild guess is that they took off their jackets to show off their short sleeved dress shirts.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 07:04 PM
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xcomet,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
In trying to keep this a friendly place to communicate, i will just state it is obvious that you do not have small children or teens, which you have to find a jacket for! Most families cant afford to spend over one hundred dollars on a jacket for a child who will wear it once on a cruise. Perhaps the dining room ,are more interested in how appropriately the children behave, in their dress casual clothes ,than having them misbehaving in a suit!
Let me be a bit blunt. Anybody who cannot afford proper attire for a cruise cannot afford the cruise, either. Proper dress is, quite simply, part of the cost of a cruise.

Having said that, I agree that it does not make sense to spend $100 on a jacket that a child will wear once. Rather, it makes a lot more sense to rent proper formalwear for the child, and the rental probably would cost about half that amount. All "tuxedo" rental services have plenty of formalwear in a good selection of styles for boys of all ages because they have a steady demand to outfit ring bearers and "junior ushers" for weddings -- and the outfits must match or coordinate with the rest of the wedding party.

And I'll add that, any parent who brings children on a cruise and does not model proper behavior for them by dressing in keeping with the dress code is doing a gross disservice to those children. In fact, it's fair to say that such an adult really is not fit to be a parent.

Norm.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
xcomet,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
In trying to keep this a friendly place to communicate, i will just state it is obvious that you do not have small children or teens, which you have to find a jacket for! Most families cant afford to spend over one hundred dollars on a jacket for a child who will wear it once on a cruise. Perhaps the dining room ,are more interested in how appropriately the children behave, in their dress casual clothes ,than having them misbehaving in a suit!
Let me be a bit blunt. Anybody who cannot afford proper attire for a cruise cannot afford the cruise, either. Proper dress is, quite simply, part of the cost of a cruise.

Having said that, I agree that it does not make sense to spend $100 on a jacket that a child will wear once. Rather, it makes a lot more sense to rent proper formalwear for the child, and the rental probably would cost about half that amount. All "tuxedo" rental services have plenty of formalwear in a good selection of styles for boys of all ages because they have a steady demand to outfit ring bearers and "junior ushers" for weddings -- and the outfits must match or coordinate with the rest of the wedding party.

And I'll add that, any parent who brings children on a cruise and does not model proper behavior for them by dressing in keeping with the dress code is doing a gross disservice to those children. In fact, it's fair to say that such an adult really is not fit to be a parent.

Norm.
Ignoring our earlier "discussion" on tipping, I have to say that I couldn't agree with you more.

Remember that we live in a society where parents believe "my kid should be able to do whatever he/she wants".
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 01:43 PM
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There is a huge difference between not being foolish with money and being a parent who lets their kids do anything. Proper table manners and discipline can be taught regardless of attire. Please don't let yourself get bullied into spending money that you and only you know if you can afford, just to appease elitists who aren't even going to see you or your family anyway! The odds of them being on your cruise are remote and there are plenty of more moderate folks who aren't really going to care about what your children wear.
Marty
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 03:27 PM
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wmufiji, I have to ask this. Would it make you physically ill if you saw a man wearing a nice sports shirt and dress slacks instead of a suit on formal night? Also, is there anything really wrong with wearing a short sleeve dress shirt with coat and tie on formal nights? Would you shun a man whe went to a funeral and didn't wear a suit?

Would you prefer a child dressed up in a suit behaving rudely to one wearing a sport shirt and quietly eating his dinner. When I am dining on a ship on formal nights, I prefer to look at what is on my plate rather than the other diners.

Live and let live and you will live longer
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 05:18 PM
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Paul,

I don't think I ever made any statement saying that it would make me physically ill. It will make me angry.

Also, you refer to only dinner. On formal night, it isn't right to go to the bars or entertainment venues in casual dress. It is formal night, not formal dinner.

Third of all, I am highly offended when men don't wear suits to weddings and funerals. It is a direct sign of disrespect for the people the event is being held for. That's basic etiquette, not my opinion.

As far as letting others live, that is exactly what I am doing. Just because I am stating an opinion doesn't mean I am in these people's staterooms telling them what they can or can't wear.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 12:10 AM
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Marty,

Quote:
Originally Posted by colorcrazie
There is a huge difference between not being foolish with money and being a parent who lets their kids do anything. Proper table manners and discipline can be taught regardless of attire. Please don't let yourself get bullied into spending money that you and only you know if you can afford, just to appease elitists who aren't even going to see you or your family anyway! The odds of them being on your cruise are remote and there are plenty of more moderate folks who aren't really going to care about what your children wear.
*very deep sigh*

Now why on earth do I keep feeling like we really need to replicate Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" (which Learner and Lowe turned into the musical "My Fair Lady") on a national scale???

This is not about elitism at all. Rather, it is simply about following establshed norms of proper dress for social occasions. If you read the applicable section of any manual on social etiquette -- and your local public library should have one, probably located in the reference section -- you would find that it says exactly what we are saying about proper dress (to wit, that childen follow the same standard of dress as adults unless the host(ess) prescribes a different standard of dress for children of their age) and that the "requested" or "suggested" attire is NOT optional. I'm not making this stuff up. Indeed, I couldn't!

Norm.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 02:50 AM
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There seem to be several threads covering this topic amongst the several boards!

It has been said before, but it bears repeating -- formal events require formal attire. Inappropriate attire demonstrates disrespect for the event and the passengers attending.

Norm's and my manuals of style vary slightly in the details, but he is quite correct in the sartorial advice he has given.

There are passengers who complain that they have "paid the same" for their cruises, and should be allowed into the dining room on formal evening, in less than formal attire.

But these passengers have not paid the same -- you see, they have not purchased (or rented) the appropriate attire.

Dean
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Old February 24th, 2007, 01:46 PM
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Ah Norm,
I do love it when you prove my point for me. If you knew anything about etiquette beyond dress code rules that you read in a book, you would know that your Taming of the Shrew comment was way out of line. In true polite society, you would be snubbed regardless of your attire. It may have gotten past our moderators, but there is a reason that the word "polite" is used when referring to those who know true etiquette.
Marty
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Old February 24th, 2007, 02:30 PM
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Marty,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Ah Norm,
I do love it when you prove my point for me. If you knew anything about etiquette beyond dress code rules that you read in a book, you would know that your Taming of the Shrew comment was way out of line. In true polite society, you would be snubbed regardless of your attire. It may have gotten past our moderators, but there is a reason that the word "polite" is used when referring to those who know true etiquette.
The comment was not directed at you personally, as clearly indicated by its wording ("replicate... on a national scale"), and I'm sorry if it came across otherwise. I was feeling more than a little exacerbated after having just replied to several posts on similar topics on another board, a couple of which squarely took aim at the messenger because the poster did not lke the message. Your post was quite mild in comparison. My reaction was to the bigger picture.

Norm.
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Old February 25th, 2007, 01:02 PM
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Norm,
Sorry for the misunderstanding. I must admit I sometimes miss our old sparring jousts!
Cheers,
Marty
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Old February 25th, 2007, 06:07 PM
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Marty,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Sorry for the misunderstanding.
Really, there was no way that you could possibly have known the context that caused my sense of frustration of that particular moment from this thread. I probably should have bracketed the lament with "[aside]" and "[/aside]" to make it clear that it was not directed at you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
I must admit I sometimes miss our old sparring jousts!
Oh, so you really want to go a few more rounds???

Norm.
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Old February 26th, 2007, 10:39 PM
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Soon, Norm, soon.....evil laugh
Marty
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