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Old April 13th, 2012, 01:59 PM
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Default Claustrophobia can happen, but not on cruise ships

Claustrophobia - a fear of being in closed or small spaces or an unhappy or uncomfortable feeling caused by being in a situation that limits or restricts you. More than likely you will not encounter claustrophobic conditions on the ship. It would only occur in catastrophic situations like the ship rolling over after being hit by a Tsunami like in the movie the "The Poseidon Adventure"-
a fictional shipwreck tale. The 'Poseidon' was capsized by a Tsunami, and a handful of survivors trapped in airpockets try to make it to the propellor shaft where the hull is thinnest. They were challenged with the task of getting through flooded portals which would have challenged the most claustrophobic-resistant person.

Bringing the problem to a more realistic level, I think the possiblities of claustrophobic attack are more possible on a shore excursion. The person who is cluastrophobic will generally know themselves, but they will not always know when the conditions for an attack will occur. I have witnessed a man in Puerto Rico suffer a case of claustrophobia while he was descending a set of circular stairs with a very low ceiling. I also saw this occur on the submarine at Baltimore Harbor when a woman had a claustrophobic attack during a tour of the sub.

I can only say that persons who might be subject to these attacks, should think twice about some activities like: Submarine rides, cave raft floats, cave exploring.

Don't let claustrophobia mess up your cruise.
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Old April 13th, 2012, 10:30 PM
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I normally suffer from this but on my last cruise I spent 12 nights in an indoor cabin and walked through a very long tunnel with very little lighting .
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Old April 18th, 2012, 01:53 PM
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The tourist submarines in St Thomas gave me my first taste of claustrophobia when I realized there was no way out (if I open a hatch everybody would get flooded and the thing would sit on the ocean floor. But I just decided not to think about it and it was then a great tour.

I once got very dizzy on some stairs (circular) in an old church in gdansk. Going round and round for over 100 steps really got me dizzy and scared because the space was so tight it made the steps very narrow (easy to slip) - plus you couldn't really stop because people were coming down and someone could not see you and fall over you.

To be clear the turret was only about 4-feet across and the steps got narrower in the middle (not sure why) - but you had to stay on the outside.
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Old April 18th, 2012, 04:24 PM
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The tourist submarines in St Thomas gave me my first taste of claustrophobia when I realized there was no way out (if I open a hatch everybody would get flooded and the thing would sit on the ocean floor. But I just decided not to think about it and it was then a great tour.

I once got very dizzy on some stairs (circular) in an old church in gdansk. Going round and round for over 100 steps really got me dizzy and scared because the space was so tight it made the steps very narrow (easy to slip) - plus you couldn't really stop because people were coming down and someone could not see you and fall over you.

To be clear the turret was only about 4-feet across and the steps got narrower in the middle (not sure why) - but you had to stay on the outside.
This is the type of experience that can make you a bit leary of enclosed space. Disney Land submarine was my first encounter with tight space fear. I'll would say I have a definite fear of spelunking which would keep me out of cave explorations and off of any tours that went into most caves. In a recent issue of National Geographic they had an extensive coverage of spelunkers down in the mid south. They published a picture of a guy squeezing through a narrow opening on his belly. The scary thing was that it brought back memories of a similar picture published in National Geographic from about forty years ago where the guy was sliding on his belly on an ice floor through a narrow opening. To even write about it bothers me.
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Old April 18th, 2012, 04:26 PM
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I think Disneyland actually said claustrophobia was a main reason why they closed the submarine ride. And it doesn't even go fully underwater.
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Old April 18th, 2012, 08:49 PM
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I think Disneyland actually said claustrophobia was a main reason why they closed the submarine ride. And it doesn't even go fully underwater.
The problem with that being a reason is that the attraction is operating again. Just under a different name. Disney World's was closed for various reasons, including the cost of keeping the lagoon structurally sound (or so I hear ... again see my disclaimer )

Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old April 18th, 2012, 10:30 PM
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I'm not a claustrophobic person but I almost lost it at the Great Pyramid. You go up a very narrow tunnel to the Great Burial Chamber. There are other people coming down and it got pretty tight. I ended up about five minutes behind my wife because I had to stop and "compose" myself. The great chamber isn't that great but it's neat to say I've been there.

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Old April 21st, 2012, 04:12 PM
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I'm not a claustrophobic person but I almost lost it at the Great Pyramid. You go up a very narrow tunnel to the Great Burial Chamber. There are other people coming down and it got pretty tight. I ended up about five minutes behind my wife because I had to stop and "compose" myself. The great chamber isn't that great but it's neat to say I've been there.

Take care,
Mike
I see that you didn't let claustrophobia mess up your tour of the Pyramid. I have seen that tunnel and I personaly feel that it takes some a pretty stable person to handle it.

I read this information on the internet that might help other cruisemates when they get into a situation where they have anxiety and panic of claustrophobia.

1. Count numbers down from 100. Do this very quickly, and repeat over and over. Say the numbers softly out loud if possible.
2. Disempower the attack and laugh about it. Tell yourself: "This can't hurt me, never has. This is meaningless."
3. Keep moving constantly. Step up and down, rub your hands together, rub or lightly slap your face repeatedly.
4. Shake your arms and legs, and clench your fists. Do the same thing with your feet. Roll your shoulders over and back again repeatedly.
5. Talk to someone nearby, whether it's someone you know or not. Even just saying hello can be enough of a distraction.
6. Breathe in slowly and deeply through your nose. Count to 4, then breathe out slowly through your mouth.
7. Relax your shoulders and focus intently on a single, static object. Fascinate yourself with that object.
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Old April 22nd, 2012, 09:29 AM
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The only time I had to fight claustrophobia is when I had to crawl under a house to thread a gas line through the floor. The house was built on 2x12s that were six inches off of the ground and were on 2 ft. centers. I essentially had to inch my way back about 25 ft. in a 2' x 1.5' tunnel. I had a friend tie a rope on my ankle to help pull me out if I got stuck.

About half way in I started to really feel claustrophobic. I did what many have already suggested. I closed my eyes, slowed my breathing and calmed myself. I was then fine.
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 04:19 AM
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The only time I had to fight claustrophobia is when I had to crawl under a house to thread a gas line through the floor. The house was built on 2x12s that were six inches off of the ground and were on 2 ft. centers. I essentially had to inch my way back about 25 ft. in a 2' x 1.5' tunnel. I had a friend tie a rope on my ankle to help pull me out if I got stuck.

About half way in I started to really feel claustrophobic. I did what many have already suggested. I closed my eyes, slowed my breathing and calmed myself. I was then fine.
If you read the National Geographic article on spelunking the spelunker wears a loop of plastic around their ankle that is called the "chicken loop." It is used to pull the spelunker out if they get stuck. You were being smart.
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 11:25 AM
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Yes - I also remember the feeling in the Great Pyramid at Giza. That was something else. You have to bend over and walk about 150 feet to the burial chamber. The passage is only about three feet wide and four feet tall.

I had claustrophobia badly there as well, but I just kept telling myself "these rocks have held together for 4000 years, they are not going to fall on me" and "I really want to say I walked into this pyramid as far as anyone can go."

But that was one of the tougher claustrophobia feelings. I felt a lot better when we finally got out.
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Old April 24th, 2012, 09:59 AM
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Yes - I also remember the feeling in the Great Pyramid at Giza. That was something else. You have to bend over and walk about 150 feet to the burial chamber. The passage is only about three feet wide and four feet tall.

I had claustrophobia badly there as well, but I just kept telling myself "these rocks have held together for 4000 years, they are not going to fall on me" and "I really want to say I walked into this pyramid as far as anyone can go."

But that was one of the tougher claustrophobia feelings. I felt a lot better when we finally got out.
Your description of your experience in the Great Pyramid at Giza convinces me that I will restrict my pyramid esploring to the Indiana Jones attractions in Florida.
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Old October 19th, 2012, 09:57 PM
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I to have problems, first time I was 8 or so, my Aunt made myself and 2 cousins stand in a phone box with her, because of busy road, I passed out, hit my head, no other explanation for it, Was called for jury service, locked away in old windowless room on and off over 2 days, barley managed, although my hands and wrists were red raw from rubbing at them! So, although booking first cruise with inside cabin, 2 doors from elevator area, fast exit, and only plan to use it for shower and change, or to sleep. Crowds can present problems to, have been known to leave the supermarket when it is to busy. discovered on planes, isle seat, or even inside isle is better than window, as you can easily get up and walk the isles to ease stress.
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