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Old February 21st, 2007, 04:24 PM
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Default Dress Codes?

We are cruising the week of easter on the Navigator...and we are nervous about the dress code in the dining rooms. Do the men reallly have to wear jackets? My daughter is 12, can she just wear shorts and a shirt? What about formal night, is a suit really required? We are on vacation really not into getting dressed up...any imput would really help? Thanks
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Old February 21st, 2007, 04:56 PM
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Yes, she will be out of place most people do follow the dress code rules. The dining room is a little on the cool to cold side. If you don't want to dress up their is another dining room on the same deck as the breakfast and lunch buffet. I believe they serve the same food as the main dining room. Most of the children I have seen were all dressed up on formal nights in dressese and even boys as young as 4 in tuxes.

Not following the dress code takes away from the other passengers dining experience.
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Old February 21st, 2007, 09:32 PM
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Default Re: Dress Codes?

NT0712,

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We are cruising the week of easter on the Navigator...and we are nervous about the dress code in the dining rooms. Do the men reallly have to wear jackets?
Not on the "casual" evenings. Rather, on "casual" (or "smart casual" or "resort casual" or whatever other "casual") evenings, gentlemen wear a shirt with a collar, slacks (not bluejeans), and dress shoes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
My daughter is 12, can she just wear shorts and a shirt?
Not to dinner, even on "casual" evenings.

Properly, children and teens should conform to the same standards of dress as all other passengers unless the cruise line prescribes a different standard of dress for them (which, AFAIK, Royal Caribbean does not).

>> On the "casual" evenings, your daughter should wear a reasonably nice top with either a skirt or slacks.

>> Your daughter should wear a "party dress" and appropriate shoes, such as she might wear to a wedding or some other dressy special event at home, on the "formal" evenings. When she gets into high school, the "formal" evenings will be another opportunity to wear her prom dresses.

Some ships do have special dinners for the youth and teen groups on several evenings of a cruise. If so, there may be a different standard of dress than the regular evening dress code for those dinners. The youth program will provide information about such dinners onboard.

Quote:
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What about formal night, is a suit really required?
That's the minimum. A "black tie" outfit (dinner jacket or tuxedo) actually is preferable.

The "formal" evenings on a cruise are rightfully "black tie" events, and this standard rightfully applies not only in the dining room, but also in all lounges, showrooms, and other public areas. Back in the 1970's, most cruise lines started admitting dark -- and I do mean DARK -- business suits as an accommodation to the reality that very few gentlemen owned a dinner jacket outfit or a tuxedo. Of course, our society has grown much more casual over the past three decades so now a lot of men don't own business suits, either. The consequence actually has been an increase in the number gentlemen who don the real thing because, quite simply, it's less expensive to rent formalwear than to buy a business suit if you don't own either. Also, many gentlemen who take cruises frequently have bought "black tie" outfits to wear on the "formal" evenings.

I do hear stories of some men "getting away with" wearing sport coats and ties for the "formal" evenings on some other cruise lines, though it really is not proper. I don't know whether you could "get away with" it on Royal Caribbean or not.

I should also mention that you can rent formalwear through the cruise line if you don't want to deal with packing it for travel. If you send your sizes and selections in advance, the cruise line will deliver a "black tie" outfit to your cabin on embarkation day and pick it up from your cabin after you leave. The cost of this service is in line with the cost of renting a similar outfit from a local "tuxedo" shop.

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Originally Posted by You
We are on vacation really not into getting dressed up...any imput would really help? Thanks
Well, Royal Caribbean does offer alternative dining (I think that it's in the form of a dinner buffet) for passengers who don't want to dress for the "formal" evenings -- but there might not be much in the way of "casual" entertainment. OTOH, passengers who "opt out" of the "formal" evenings really do miss some of the most memorable moments of a cruise. The "formal" evenings are the evenings when the whole ship really pulls out all the stops -- the dining room serves up its best menus, often with extra touches that don't happen on other evenings, the entertainers put on their best shows, and many lines hold very classy special events that don't happen on other evenings (again, I really don't know what Royal Caribbean does in this regard). Also, the experience of these "formal" evenings will be very memorable for your daughter, as well as a fabulous learning experience that will expand her horizons in a very positive way. Thus, I really want to encourage you to give the "formal" evenings a fair try.

Having said that, it's certainly fair to consider whether Royal Caribbean International offers what you want for your vacations in the future -- and you certainly will have a better sense of that after your cruise. There are several cruise lines of equal or superior quality that do not hold "formal" evenings.

>> Disney Cruises offers a "premium" product with "casual" dress every evening that, by all accounts, is every bit as wonderful for adults and teens as for children. And Disney has announced plans to expand beyond the Bahamas and Caribbean itineraries, with a ship deploying to Europe for the summer season and a ship going to the Mexican Riviera next year.

>> Oceana Cruises also offers a "premium" cruise product with "casual" dress every evening and itineraries that span the globe.

>> Norwegian Cruise Lines advertises "formal optional" evenings rather than true "formal" evenings where evening "casual" attire is acceptable.

>> Windjammer Barefoot Cruises is as casual as its name implies. On Windjammer, you really can go to dinner in shorts and a "T" shirt.

There are also several lines that operate smaller vessels with "all casual" dress standards on coastal voyages. Many of these lines are quite spartan in comparison to the major cruise lines, but they may well be closer to your style.

Anyway, I do wish you and your family a fabulous cruise!

Norm.
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 10:56 PM
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The question is addressing the dress code in the dining room on an RCCL ship. The correct answer is this. RCCL has a SUGGESTED dress code only. With that said the bottom line is this as it is posted outside all dining rooms No swimwear, no shorts EXCEPT during breakfast or lunch, no ballcaps, and shoes must be worn. Some people dress formally on formal night some dress casually BUT all are welcome by RCCL and as they own the cruiseline they set the rules! It is correct that the dining rooms are kept cool so I would suggest a sweater or long pants. By the way " smart casual" is no longer listed on many of the RCCL ship Compasses, only formal or casual. For those that are offended by the way someone else may dress during dinner on an RCCL ship, they may want to sail on Seaborn or Crystal or QE2 as even the QM2 has relaxed their code and they do have a mandatory code unlike RCCL. If you enjoy dressing for dinner, by all means do so, but do not dictate mandatory dress codes that do not exist on an RCCL ship. Someone recently return from a cruise out of Miami on another board. Jeans, jeans and MORE jeans was reported! Current fashion trends dictate what is appropriate dress and we all know " society " wants to be fashionable!
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 01:08 AM
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I specifically asked the the head waiter about the "dress code" on our last cruise. They said that they simply look the other way if a guest is not dressed appropriately. Some people are offended if other guests do not dress accordingly and others are not. It does not bother me, one way or the other. I do not have an issue with dressing in formal wear, but if someone chooses not to, it doen't bother me. Does this answer your question?
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 01:25 AM
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The majority of people we spotted on our ship wearing jeans and being under dressed were not your stereotypical "trend setters". They were the type that wear Dockers Blue Denim pants, not $200 Seven jeans. Not that either should be acceptable on the ship, period.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 01:58 AM
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explorer,

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Originally Posted by You
The question is addressing the dress code in the dining room on an RCCL ship. The correct answer is this. RCCL has a SUGGESTED dress code only.
The correct answer is that the word "suggested" in this context is itself a courtesy, but it in fact carries a very strong expectation of compliance. From a standoint of standard social etiquette, failure to comply is boorish, rude, ignorant, and otherwise unacceptable, regarless of whether the cruise line makes an effort to enforce the published standad of dress or not. Indeed, social etiquette dictates that enforcement should be completely unnecessary because nobody should show up for the event who is not in compliance.

Norm.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 01:59 AM
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Whether jeans are 200.00 or 2000.00 Gucci jeans it doesn't really matter what the price tag is. The fact is they remain fashionable and found at the most formal of all events today and have been for several years now despite the fact some people do not appreciate that. As I stated before RCCL gives its passengers the option to dress the way they wish. I'm sure if they wanted to make a mandatory dress code they would but there must be a good reason why they do not. That reason is, RCCL and other cruiselines are listening to what the majority of their passengers want today and that is a more casual vacation experience. They are only interested in filling the ships and their target market is the family/casual market. You do not find rock walls, golf courses, ice skating, in line skating, flow riders, water parks and slides, Johnny Rockets, etc. on Seaborn or Cunard. They are clearly targeting the passenger that is looking for a more relaxed casual fun vacation experience. I have always been much more interested in what my tablemates are saying than what they are wearing.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 02:22 AM
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Whether jeans are 200.00 or 2000.00 Gucci jeans it doesn't really matter what the price tag is. The fact is they remain fashionable and found at the most formal of all events today and have been for several years now despite the fact some people do not appreciate that. As I stated before RCCL gives its passengers the option to dress the way they wish. I'm sure if they wanted to make a mandatory dress code they would but there must be a good reason why they do not. That reason is, RCCL and other cruiselines are listening to what the majority of their passengers want today and that is a more casual vacation experience. They are only interested in filling the ships and their target market is the family/casual market. You do not find rock walls, golf courses, ice skating, in line skating, flow riders, water parks and slides, Johnny Rockets, etc. on Seaborn or Cunard. They are clearly targeting the passenger that is looking for a more relaxed casual fun vacation experience. I have always been much more interested in what my tablemates are saying than what they are wearing.
First of all, no one would be caught dead wearing jeans at any formal events I attend where I live...or even any nice restaurants.

Second, it is not the majority of cruisers that ask for more casual rules. It is the vocal minority that doesn't want to be "restricted". The cruise lines would rather look the other way to keep the boorish "under-dressers" quiet than have to deal with demands to wear sweat pants to dinner while the rest of us who follow the social expectations are forced to stomach looking at this garbage.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 03:15 AM
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Jeans are never appropriate attire at any event that even approaches formal.

A formal event requires formal attire.

Inappropriate attire demonstrates a lack of respect for the event and the persons attending the event. If passengers wish to dress casually, there are casual dining venues available to those passengers.

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Old February 23rd, 2007, 03:18 AM
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You must not be from NYC if you've never witnessed someone wearing jeans at a formal event. RCCL and other cruiselines spend millions on market research, Now if their research showed the majority of cruise passengers would like to see more formal attire while on a cruise, don't you think they would make sure they would have mandatory dress codes as they would be afraid they would lose the majority of their business to a more formal line such as Cunard? You may not like the more casual environment but be realistic. It is the VAST majority that is proven by market research that has prompted RCCL, NCL, and other lines to promote a more casual cruise experience. I really cannot imagine why this subject would upset you so much that you consider a more casual attire as garbage while on a vacation. Is that how you see your fellow shipmates? I don't make the rules, RCCL does. If you have such an issue with the subject of attire why don't you voice your opinion to RCCL? Or choose another line that still adheres to the old grand style of cruising? Seaborn, Crystal and Cunard are all lovely lines that would definitely allow you to see everyone in more formal attire but of course they are a tad more expensive but you may find them priceless as you would not be forced to look upon " garbage " as you put it. I do not mean to be disrepectful to you but surely you can see that cruising has changed a great deal in the past few years and not just in regards to attire. RCCL, like any smart corporation is listening to what their passengers want and they are answering that demand. It's nothing personal, it's just business to them and the other mass market lines. Carnival is the number one cruiseline corporation and RCCL is second. Carnival's more formal ships are the Cunard fleet, RCCL's more formal ships are the Celebrity fleet so the top cruise corporations in the world do still give their passengers a choice for those that want a more formal cruise experiene.
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:18 AM
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Thank you everyone for your comments...I feel much better. We leave on the Navigator April 7th and I cannot wait. We will not be bringing any jeans even my 12 year old! It's nice to know though that I can go into dinner in a pair of carpi's and a nice shirt. No sure if we'll attempt formal night or not though. I dress everyday for work and I am looking for to a relaxing no fuss kind of week. NT in Ohio
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Old February 23rd, 2007, 11:47 PM
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explorer,

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You must not be from NYC if you've never witnessed someone wearing jeans at a formal event.
Yes, I have seen morons show up for social events in totally inappropriate attire. But then there are morons who kill other people in cold blood, too, and some of them "get away with" it! Does the fact that a few morons "get away with" murdering other people mean that it's okay to murder other people?

If not, then why do you think that the fact that a few morons "get away with" not following societal norms of dress makes it okay not to follow societal norms of dress?

BTW, showing up at social functions in inappropriate attire is much more easily forgiven when it's done out of ignorance than when it's done out of arrogance. Also, a social function for which expected dress is jeans absolutely is NOT a "formal" event.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
RCCL and other cruiselines spend millions on market research, Now if their research showed the majority of cruise passengers would like to see more formal attire while on a cruise, don't you think they would make sure they would have mandatory dress codes as they would be afraid they would lose the majority of their business to a more formal line such as Cunard? You may not like the more casual environment but be realistic. It is the VAST majority that is proven by market research that has prompted RCCL, NCL, and other lines to promote a more casual cruise experience. I really cannot imagine why this subject would upset you so much that you consider a more casual attire as garbage while on a vacation. Is that how you see your fellow shipmates? I don't make the rules, RCCL does. If you have such an issue with the subject of attire why don't you voice your opinion to RCCL? Or choose another line that still adheres to the old grand style of cruising? Seaborn, Crystal and Cunard are all lovely lines that would definitely allow you to see everyone in more formal attire but of course they are a tad more expensive but you may find them priceless as you would not be forced to look upon " garbage " as you put it. I do not mean to be disrepectful to you but surely you can see that cruising has changed a great deal in the past few years and not just in regards to attire. RCCL, like any smart corporation is listening to what their passengers want and they are answering that demand. It's nothing personal, it's just business to them and the other mass market lines. Carnival is the number one cruiseline corporation and RCCL is second. Carnival's more formal ships are the Cunard fleet, RCCL's more formal ships are the Celebrity fleet so the top cruise corporations in the world do still give their passengers a choice for those that want a more formal cruise experiene.
Rather, I think that the major cruise lines are making a big mistake by trying to satisfy everybody on the same ship. In reality, they are satisfying nobody. There's an inherent conflict when people who want a couple authentic "formal" evenings during their vacation purchase a cruise on a line that advertises "formal" evenings, while another group decide that they don't want to dress up but they want to eat in the same dining room, attend the sams show, etc., as the people who are dressed properly for the occasion. The cruise line offends one group if it enforces the prescribed standards of dress, and it offends the other group if it does not, so it becomes a "no win" situation for the cruise line. I think the only way to resolve this is to have separate ships that cater to each group. Separation of those ships into two distinct cruise lines would provide clear branding so you and I could easily choose whichever type of cruise we prefer -- and if we make the wrong choice, we would have to endure it because the standards would be enforced.

In this context, I have long thought, and often suggested on these boards, that Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. should split the ships of Royal Caribbean International into two cruise lines. One cruise line would retain the name and the present product, but with strict enforcement of the "suggested" dress. The new line, as I envisoned it, would become an "all casual" product. Of course, I understood "all casual" to mean that evening attire would be "country club casual" -- that is, shirts with collars and no denim.

Considering your comments about jeans I'm realizing that splitting Royal Caribbean International into two lines is not quite the right solution. Rather, the right solution is to split it into three lines -- one which would maintain (but enforce) the present dress standards, one that would be "resort casual" (shirts with collars and NO denim anything), and one that would be "farm" casual (jeans, "T" shirts, etc., permitted anywhere, any time). Heck, the third line could even have a policy that neckties get cut off with sissors in a very ceremonial manner if anybody wears them! Come booking time, you pay your money and you take your choice, realizing that each line will enforce its respective standards of dress.

Would that be acceptable to you?

Norm.
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Old February 24th, 2007, 12:09 AM
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RCCL's more formal ships are the Celebrity fleet so the top cruise corporations in the world do still give their passengers a choice for those that want a more formal cruise experiene.
Actually Celebrity doesn't enforce it's "suggested" dress codes either. And I've sailed Regent Seven Seas, and have witnessed passengers in the dining room wearing blue jeans. I've not sailed Cunard, so can't say if they do or not.

But, it's obvious the cruise lines don't know how to handle the situation, so simply pretend, turn the other way, and let the debate continue.

That is truly what urks me the most. As a cruise line don't pretend to be something they are not!

I've cruised on NCL, and enjoyed the casual atmposphere, and the lack of necessity to pack the extra formal wear. And frankly, I think if they raise the overall quality of their food service a bit, the other majors could be in for some very stiff competition.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 05:08 PM
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For casual nights it is acceptable for men to wear jeans and polo-shirts. Shorts are frowned upon in the dining room at all time.
For semi-casual nights the recommendation is a jacket and tie for men. However it is a bit of a pain having to drag these along on vacation. On all cruises I have attended most people dress smart-casual - Chino, short sleeve shirts, light dress's for ladies.
For the formal night it is recommended that you do dress up - tux or suit for gents and dress for ladies. To be honest, almost everyone who comes to the dining room on the formal nights make the effort and although the staff will not turn you away if you arrive in jeans, you might feel very uncomfortable yourself.
Always remember that there are other eating options on the formal nights. Personally for my cruises I ensure that I have a couple of smart casual trousers and short sleeved shirts. I then hire a tux for the evening.
Regarding your daughter - I would just say again that shorts are not appreciated in the dining room but I think that smart-casual wear is acceptable for formal night (given her age). But again I would say that part of the cruise experience is the formal wear - the photos - the class of it. It's worth making the effort!
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 06:50 PM
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wilde_37,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
For casual nights it is acceptable for men to wear jeans and polo-shirts. Shorts are frowned upon in the dining room at all time.
For semi-casual nights the recommendation is a jacket and tie for men. However it is a bit of a pain having to drag these along on vacation. On all cruises I have attended most people dress smart-casual - Chino, short sleeve shirts, light dress's for ladies.
For the formal night it is recommended that you do dress up - tux or suit for gents and dress for ladies. To be honest, almost everyone who comes to the dining room on the formal nights make the effort and although the staff will not turn you away if you arrive in jeans, you might feel very uncomfortable yourself.
Always remember that there are other eating options on the formal nights. Personally for my cruises I ensure that I have a couple of smart casual trousers and short sleeved shirts. I then hire a tux for the evening.
Regarding your daughter - I would just say again that shorts are not appreciated in the dining room but I think that smart-casual wear is acceptable for formal night (given her age). But again I would say that part of the cruise experience is the formal wear - the photos - the class of it. It's worth making the effort!
Although one can "get away with" wearing something less than the "requested" or "suggested" attire, the norms of social etiquette -- which you can verify in any manual of social etiquette -- require absolute conformance to "requested" or "suggested" attire when attending a social function, so that there should never be a need for enforcement thereof. IOW, to fail to conform is extremely rude to the host (on a cruise, the master of the vessel) and the other guests (passengers and ship's staff) in attendance, and thus manifests a total lack of class.

Norm.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 07:30 PM
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Although one can "get away with" wearing something less than the "requested" or "suggested" attire, the norms of social etiquette -- which you can verify in any manual of social etiquette
Norm.. just bad luck you were born in the wrong century
I'd very curious how many manual's for social etiquette have been sold in the past year.

As you know I'm not at all in opposition to dressing to meet suggest dress codes, the reality on ships, and in fact in the vast majority of society is quite different from the standards you talk about.

If you're living a life where you encounter such conformity, you're in an entirely different world than I encounter in my daily life 8)
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 11:15 PM
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I still say that why would you go on a cruise and act as though you are going to a White Castle for dinner ? What is called "smart casual" is good for normal nights, and on formal nights suit and tie for the men, stylish dresses for the women. Why not ?
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 01:27 AM
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Kukim

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Norm.. just bad luck you were born in the wrong century
I'd very curious how many manual's for social etiquette have been sold in the past year.
Apparently more than a few. Just recently, I have found modern versions that discuss the subtle distinctions between terms like "smart casual" and "business casual" and "country club casual" and... well, you get the idea. And they still state clearly that one is expected to wear the attire that the host(ess) "requests" or "suggests" oor otheriwise indicates when attending a social function. These tomes are two or three inches thick and hardbound, so the publishers have made a considerable investment in printing them. I doubt that the publishers would make such an investment if these books were not selling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
As you know I'm not at all in opposition to dressing to meet suggest dress codes, the reality on ships, and in fact in the vast majority of society is quite different from the standards you talk about.

If you're living a life where you encounter such conformity, you're in an entirely different world than I encounter in my daily life 8)
Around here, quite a few businesses bring in specialists in social etiquette to train their staffs in many aspects of social etiquette -- manner of dress, table manners, service cues, place settings (which fork, knife, sppon, bread and butter plate, etc., to use), invitations and replies, where to sit, how to handle diffiult social situations, etc. -- because it's still expected in the conduct of business and they have discovered that a lot of the people that they hire have never had such training.

OTOH, there's a pretty coompelling argument that eastern Massachusetts is another world....

But, seriously, it seems reasonable to steer people who don't want to dress for "formal" evenings to cruise lines that don't have "formal" evenings, like Disney Cruises and Oceana Cruises, or to lines that clearly advertise a "formal optional" policy, like Norwegian Cruise Line.

Norm.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 01:44 AM
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subtropic,

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I still say that why would you go on a cruise and act as though you are going to a White Castle for dinner ? What is called "smart casual" is good for normal nights, and on formal nights suit and tie for the men, stylish dresses for the women. Why not ?
That sounds reasonable, with two caveats.

>> 1. The attire that you propose for what you called "formal" evenings really is "semiformal" rather than "formal" so the cruise line really should represent those evenings accordingly -- that is, call them "semiformal" evenings rather than "formal" evenings.

>> 2. Practically speaking, I'm not sure how many passengers such a cruise line would draw -- especially if it operates in either the "mainstream" segment or the "economy" segment of the cruise market. With so many companies now maintaining a "business casual" standard of dress in the workplace, a lot of gentlemen no longer own business suits. The cruise lines may have to offer a business suit rental service to accommodate such individuals.

In any case, it would be interesting to try what you propose!

Norm.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subtropic
I still say that why would you go on a cruise and act as though you are going to a White Castle for dinner ? What is called "smart casual" is good for normal nights, and on formal nights suit and tie for the men, stylish dresses for the women. Why not ?
Great point. I actually like formal night as this is one of the few times in the year that our entire family gets dressed up. We have collected a great sequence of formal portraits that shows our kids growing up year by year - almost like Santa pictures, but with everyone in it!
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Old March 4th, 2007, 12:35 PM
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Wow Norm!

Guess you didn't really read my reply. I recommended they dress up for formal night and offered alternatives to attending formal night also. RCCL do not make it obligatory to dress to a particular standard - it is a suggested form of dress. Dressing up is one of the highlights of the cruise (but then again I did say that in my posting)

Also, which of your little books determines what "formal" is? And is that only for US readers? Most countries have their own definition of formal. In Ireland it can mean a full Irish Kilt - In caribbean countries that could be a form of Sarong. My last cruise had many couples wearing matching Sarongs, other couples wearing equivalent dress.

We are not living in the 19th century - maybe the advice I should have given the lady was that she should have gone on a ship where they provide "steerage" decks. Just so that sensibilities are not offended!!!
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Old March 4th, 2007, 11:58 PM
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wilde_37,

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Wow Norm!

Guess you didn't really read my reply.
Actually, I read your reply very carefully and answered what it said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
I recommended they dress up for formal night and offered alternatives to attending formal night also.
In my experience (not on Royal Caribbean International), attempts to accmmodate folks who want a true "formal" evening and folks who don't want to dress for such an event on the same line don't work very well. Indeed, this usually leads to conflict when folks who are not dressed appropriately "crash" one event or another of the "formal" party. Thus, it seems better for a cruise company to serve both groups on separate cruise lines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
RCCL do not make it obligatory to dress to a particular standard - it is a suggested form of dress.
And in this context, the word "suggested" does not mean that one may do otherwise. Rather, it carries weight similar to your boss "suggesting" that you do a project a certain way or a school teacher "suggesting" that a student do his or her homework. The context creates a clear expectation that the recipient of the "suggestion" will follow it. I should also mention that the word "request" would carry exactly the same weight and absolute expectation of compliance in this context.

BTW, "Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd." (RCCL) is a holding company. The cruise line is Royal Caribbean International (RCI).

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Dressing up is one of the highlights of the cruise (but then again I did say that in my posting)
I personally agree with you on this point, but it's fairly apparent that others don't. There are folks who post regularly on these boards who would prefer that every evening be "causal" (meaning the standard evening casual) and others who would prefer to go to dinner in jeans and "T" shirts. There seem to be enough folks in each category to support a cruise line or three or four.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
Also, which of your little books determines what "formal" is? And is that only for US readers? Most countries have their own definition of formal. In Ireland it can mean a full Irish Kilt - In caribbean countries that could be a form of Sarong. My last cruise had many couples wearing matching Sarongs, other couples wearing equivalent dress.
I have noted in other threads that authentic cultural equivalents of the types that you describe are quite proper. Personally, I love the Bermudan dinner jacket outfit -- complete with black formal shorts that have the same satin stripes in the outseams as the black formal pants that are standard in North America, worn with knee high black stockings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by You
We are not living in the 19th century - maybe the advice I should have given the lady was that she should have gone on a ship where they provide "steerage" decks. Just so that sensibilities are not offended!!!
I would not go quite that far, but there are cruise lines that offer "all casual" alternatives.

>> I understand that Disney Cruises prescribes "casual" attire every evening.

>> Oceana Cruises and Celebrity Exeditions (which is now distinct from Celebrity Cruises) advertise that they prescribe "casual" attire every evening.

>> Norwegian Cruise Line now advertises a "formal optional" policy.

>> Many of the coastal cruise lines, which operate smaller vessels, also are "all casual."

>> [b]Windjammer Barefoot Cruises[/i] is just as ultra-casual as its name imples -- jeans, shorts, and "T" shirts are always acceptable, even at dinner.

So folks who don't want to dress for the "formal" evenings do have plenty of options available.

Norm.
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Old March 5th, 2007, 01:24 PM
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As a 4x cruiser on RCL I have NEVER brought a suit. Don't even know if I could find a tie anymore. Simply wear a dark SJ with a collared shirt, beige slacks. Have actually received a lot of compliments on my attire. Never had a problem, nor would I anticipate one.

Also, in the showroom there has never been even the slighest hint of any inpropriety. Cruising is all about being yourself within certain well-accepted boundaries.

This works for my wife & I. Looking forward to our next trip the Sunday following Thanksgiving. Stay well!!!
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