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-   -   Nautical terms while at sea (http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/travel-gripes/295379-nautical-terms-while-sea.html)

LisaK May 14th, 2003 09:50 AM

Nautical terms while at sea
 
take this with a "grain of salt" as that is what it is intended for. Your accomodations are a cabin, stateroom, or suite not just a room. The bathroom is called the "head" the front of the ship is the "bow" the rear of the ship is the "stern" when moving about the ship if you are heading toward the bow you are going "forward. If you are heading towards the stern that is "aft" the left side of the ship is"port" the right side is "starboard" you embark and disembark you do not get on and off the ship. Anything else??? <VBG>

mbuckellew May 14th, 2003 10:01 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
And for goodness sakes, it's a SHIP, not a BOAT!!!

:)

Cheers,
Michelle B.

http://escati.linkopp.net/cgi-bin/co...zone=GMT-0500f
Land Cruise, Britain and Belgium


jedgar May 14th, 2003 10:06 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
It's an overhead not a ceiling
It's a deck not a floor
It's a bulkhead not a wall
It's a skuttlebutt not a drinking fountain
It's a galley not a kitchen
It's a mess hall not a dining room
It's a brig not a jail
It's a hatchway not a door
It's a ladder way not stairs
It' the fantail not the back of the ship
It's a swab not a mop
It's chow not food
It's a slopchute not a snackbar
It's a frosty not a beer
It's geedunk not munchies
It's hooch not booze
And a whole lot more that I just don't remember right now.

Paul B May 14th, 2003 11:17 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
But how come my room always ends up being at the back of the boat?

Suzi May 14th, 2003 11:33 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
I think I'm paying too much for chow in a mess hall...and I sure don't want to eat from a slopchute!

Suzi

mferranti May 14th, 2003 03:32 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
"Arrrrggggh me mateys, mark me words: Port is left and Starboard is right, and if you don't learn the difference I'll throw you out that little round window."


Marc May 14th, 2003 05:03 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Now why is this a "gripe?" I do remember a post where someone asked about cabins on either the port or stern sides of the ship; at least he got three out of four terms correct!


Seahunks May 14th, 2003 05:13 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
I was going to cite Quint in the movie "Jaws:" "Front, bow, back, stern and if ye don't get it right, squirt, I'll throw yer *** out that little round window in the side!"--but mferranti beat me to it.



Post Edited (05-14-03 18:03)

Suzie May 14th, 2003 07:14 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
I heard one recently on a Princess cruise:

An elderly gentleman asked me when we were scheduled to " DOCK OFF "

<XXLG>

Jay12 May 15th, 2003 05:41 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Ok but all I want to know is which rooms are better? The ones in the front of the boat or in the back? When the boat parks at a dock where do you want to be? On the Left or right for the best views? <G>

mbuckellew May 15th, 2003 08:32 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
And when the Captain is at the Captain's reception and dinner, who's driving the boat?

<G>

Cheers,
Michelle B.

http://escati.linkopp.net/cgi-bin/co...zone=GMT-0500f
Land Cruise, Britain and Belgium


Seahunks May 15th, 2003 10:40 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
A helmsman drives the boat--well, nowadays a computer. By the way, while we're on the topic of nautical terms:

Speed is measured in Knots, not miles per hour.

A knot is equal to 1 nautical mile per hour. A nautical mile is equal to one minute of great circle arc at the Equator. Which means that 1 knot = 1 minute of arc and/or 1.15 land (statute) miles per hour.

A ship making 10KTS travels at the same speed as a car going 11.5 MPH.
A ship making 20KTS travels at the same speed as a car going 23 MPH.

And here's where it gets interesting. The old national interstate speed limit was 70 MPH. Why? Because 60KTS = A full degree of arc = 69MPH. A car traveling 70MPH could cover a little more than a full degree of arc in an hour. They simply rounded the 69 up to the next mutliple of 10.

Now, stuff that through that little round window in the side.



Post Edited (05-17-03 12:34)

cap'nkruzer May 15th, 2003 10:59 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Information overload!!!!! ARGGHHHH!! LOL
SSaFWs..ED

Grodecki May 17th, 2003 11:34 AM

Re: Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
I think we shall not open our mouths on our upcoming cruise. Just point to where we want to go...wouldn't want to get the terms incorrect!. See you on the BOAT!! LOL...

Seahunks May 17th, 2003 12:44 PM

Re: Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
The Navy used to teach that the difference between a ship and a boat was that a boat could be lifted out of the water by a ship. Since ships could lift submarines out of the water, submarines were considered boats. Now, with floating drydocks and other large sea-going service vessels, the distinction between ship and boat has dimmed. I think the only true ships left by the old definition are aircraft carriers and possibly cruise ships.

And anything longer than your arm isn't a "rope"--it's a "line."


Thomas May 17th, 2003 05:13 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Ya'll are killing me here. Stop it right now mateys!

Regards
Thomas

Seahunks May 18th, 2003 11:45 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Thomas, do you mean "Belay that, Mateys!" or, possibly, "Avast! Yer killin' me!"?<LOL>

Steve


thecruiseguy May 18th, 2003 01:31 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
The true definition of a boat and a ship. "A boat is what you get into when the ship is sinking."

Suzi May 20th, 2003 10:51 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
So, what do you call a window what isn't little and round?

Suzi

debmkay May 20th, 2003 09:38 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
hmmm.......a port window?

mferranti May 21st, 2003 08:36 AM

Re: Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Do you still call it a port window if it's on the starboard side?


TimT May 22nd, 2003 10:21 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Hey! With the crappy cards I got at Blackjack on my last cruise, I think I discovered a new meaning to the nautical word "poopdeck". Either I was scuppered or I was "mizzen" something.

Tim

Set2cruz May 22nd, 2003 04:49 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
TimT, could that be mizzenformed? {{lol}}


TimT May 23rd, 2003 08:24 AM

Re: Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Mark: I am often mizzenterpreted, but seldom mizzenderstood ;-)
--Tim T, Triumph 05/04/03

Sooshie May 25th, 2003 08:01 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Hey, as long as a cruise is still a cruise I'm happy! I'm lucky if I know what side of the ship I'm on most of the time.....you know, the hooch and frosty's can get to ya. But be careful you don't want to find yourself in the drink!

Happy Cruising

pamda May 26th, 2003 11:47 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Very easy.

Ships carry boats.

HannaS77 May 28th, 2003 12:52 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Here one for the books.

When a passenger falls overboard, you are instructed to shout " MAN OVERBOARD".
I suppose if you know it is a woman you keep quiet. ?

Suzi May 28th, 2003 04:35 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
Silly -

We all know that women are too smart to fall overboard thus it's always "Man Overboard" :-)

Thomas May 29th, 2003 11:34 AM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
But if they're thrown overboard.............hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm?????

Regards,
Thomas

CruisinOkie May 29th, 2003 01:31 PM

Re: Nautical terms while at sea
 
If it's not big enough tot land an aircraft on, it's just a boat. (Works great when someone refers to their 26-footer as a "yacht").



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