Go Back   CruiseMates Cruise Community and Forums > Practical Advice > Travel Gripes!
Register Forgot Password?

Travel Gripes! Gripe about cruises or getting to one.(airlines, taxis)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old March 12th, 2006, 12:31 PM
gsujillybean's Avatar
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 58
Send a message via AIM to gsujillybean
Default Re: Taking the kids out of school

Quote:
Originally Posted by Family Man
Sorry Kuki, but the early grades are important for kids because they are learning the fundamentals of reading and writing... My six year old son just finished his first year of school and... was learning to reading and write .....
Yes, to some, taking your kids out of school for a vacation might be considered negligent.

However, I personally believe it's FAR more negligent to let your six year-old start school without knowing how to read and write. If learning is so important, why not begin teaching your kids yourself during the formative years?
__________________


Carnival Celebration--7/29/06
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old March 21st, 2006, 02:29 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 37
Default

Ha! You'd think me *really* negligent, as my kids haven't learned to read before the age of 9!

So much of school is a colossal waste of time. Some of it is good, but it's difficult for me to believe that one or two weeks can cause that much trouble for an ordinary kid.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old March 24th, 2006, 04:28 PM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 181
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandyone
Ha! You'd think me *really* negligent, as my kids haven't learned to read before the age of 9!

So much of school is a colossal waste of time. Some of it is good, but it's difficult for me to believe that one or two weeks can cause that much trouble for an ordinary kid.
hmmmm...very interesting opinion.

Why can't your kids read?
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old March 24th, 2006, 09:41 PM
Fern's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 5,104
Default

Sandyone,

I'm hoping that you either miss-typed your last post here or are just looking to get people like me stirred up.

A lonnnng time ago, I was reading at 4 years old because my wonderful Mother read to me.

This was before public pre-school and before public kindergarten! I was one of the few who could read in 1st grade. If a 9 year old child can't read today, that's really a BIG problem. They are now reading in pre-school.

How do you expect them to succeed in life if they can't read?

"Ordinary" kids CAN read way before age nine.
__________________
Fern

"A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour."

Carnival Inspiration 2002 Carnival Elation 2004
Grand Princess 2004 NCL Sun 2005
Sun Princess 2006 NCL Dream 2007
Caribbean Princess 2007 NCL Dawn 2008
Island Princess 2008 Island Princess 2009
Golden Princess 2009 Carnival Conquest 2010
Grand Princess 2010 Island Princess 2011
Grand Princess 2011 Carnival Magic 2012
Carnival Dream 2012 Island Princess 2013
Carnival Magic 2013 Carnival Legend 2014
Sea Princess 2014
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old March 25th, 2006, 02:30 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: so cal
Posts: 12
Default

Hi well this is my first time posting here.... well im 16 yrs old and my parents take me out of school for alot of our cruises..... and im always able to make up the work and keep my grades up... i dont personaly see a problem taking your kids out to go on vacation
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 07:44 AM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sblahars
Why can't your kids read?
I like your question!

Some of them can read now. My 11 yr old, who didn't read until just after his 9th birthday, reads the same as any other kid his age.

Another son, who is now 9, is learning to read. He has some troubles with 'b' and 'd' reversals, but I wouldn't call him dyslexic...he's still developing. I'm sure that he would have been called dyslexic in school because he used to have a lot more letter reversals...when he was younger. His eyes are just maturing less quickly than the average kid's.

My girls are younger and also aren't ready to read.

Unless there is something actually wrong, they'll all read when they're ready. Because I homeschool them, they don't have to be able to read math instructions or science stuff or social studies stuff. I can read them what they need and they can learn to read when they're ready without feeling like big dummies for not getting it like the rest of the kids.

I guess the simple answer to your question is that they can't read because we don't push them to do it before they're ready.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 08:24 AM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 181
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandyone

Because I homeschool them, they don't have to be able to read math instructions or science stuff or social studies stuff. I can read them what they need and they can learn to read when they're ready without feeling like big dummies for not getting it like the rest of the kids.
Do you really think this is the best approach? Don't you think that developing all of your necessary skills (reading, math, etc) should be done together?

You also seem to suggest that the kids who do learn to read their math and science lessons always feel like big dummies for not getting it. I don't quite understand. When I was in elementary school, I was about to read math, science, social studies, whatever else it may have been, and I didn't feel like a "big dummy".

And I am also curious why you think so much of school is a 'colossal' waste of time. I don't want to start a debate about homeschooling, but don't you think there is a benefit to being around others your own age every day and learning social skills?
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 09:14 AM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fern
Sandyone,

I'm hoping that you either miss-typed your last post here or are just looking to get people like me stirred up.

A lonnnng time ago, I was reading at 4 years old because my wonderful Mother read to me.

This was before public pre-school and before public kindergarten! I was one of the few who could read in 1st grade. If a 9 year old child can't read today, that's really a BIG problem. They are now reading in pre-school.

How do you expect them to succeed in life if they can't read?

"Ordinary" kids CAN read way before age nine.
Fern,

Nah, that was neither a mistype nor a trolling post.

It's great that your mother read to you. It's great that you were ready to read at age four. I read to my kids, but they still haven't been ready to read at age four. Or six. Or even eight!

They have learned to read in their own time and they read well. While my oldest didn't start reading until age 9, he was slightly above grade level when I tested him just after he turned 10.

I liken reading readiness to toilet-training readiness. We can put our kids in undies at 12-15 months old when they first start showing signs of awareness. And then we can do a billion loads of laundry as they slowly learn how to use the toilet. The other option is to wait until they are in the later signs of awareness and fully ready to train (generally between 2 and 3). Then the training is pretty simple and quick.

I have a friend who was a teacher and ran a tutoring business on the side. Her specialty was teaching 9-11 yr olds how to read. She raved about this particular program that she used that was really successful with nearly all of her students. Then she tried to use the same program to teach her 6 year old son to read. It was a major flop. My theory is that it wasn't the program that was responsible for the 9-11 yr olds' success; it was the children's *readiness* that lead to the success.

Unfortunately, these kids who learned to read late already suffered several years of school where they (and the teachers and other kids) thought that they were just dumb. Their self-image as poor students was very well formed at a young age. Perhaps *that* is why studies show that early reading leads to successful schooling. I dunno. Maybe somebody should do a study on that. (not me, though...I'm too busy reading to all my kids who can't do it for themselves...and the ones who can because they still love listening)

I expect that all of my kids will learn to read. They just won't do it as very young children. A few still have a chance...I've still got two kids under age 5 and expect a few more after them. I expect that they will all be successful in life because they were allowed to mature at their own pace. They are developing a good self-worth that's not tainted by comparing themselves to what "the average kid" can do. My kids know that they're smart and they know (well, they don't really know, but I know) that intelligence isn't necessarily measured by reading ability at a young age.

Plenty of "ordinary kids" can read before age 9. Plenty of "ordinary kids" can't read before age 9. There are even perfectly ordinary kids who don't read until they are 12 or 14. When they finally do start reading, though, they tend to make up for all that lost time and read on or above grade level in very short order.

I think I'm going to go test my now-11 yr old and see if his rubberband learning curve has launched him past his peers.

Fern, please let me know what you think of this theory. I know that when I first heard of a 12 yr old learning to read I thought his parents must be negligent. And then I tried teaching my 5 yr old to read. Our kids sure do teach us a lot!!!
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 09:29 AM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 181
Default

Let me guess...you live on some type of a compound, don't you?
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 11:24 AM
Senior Member
Cruise Maniac
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 133
Default

Back on topic. I am a public school teacher. While some teachers make a big stink about not pulling student out of school for family vacations and such, I actually approve of it...most of the time. Most students will miss very little in one week of school and if they are getting to spend that week seeing part of the country or world that they have never seen before, they are more than making up for it. I'm not saying parents should make a habit of it, but once in every year or two is not going to hurt a childs education, especially if the child is a good student to begin with. Many teachers who complain about it will do so because they don't want to deal with the make-up work etc...
__________________
Before you open your mouth to speak, please make sure it's an improvement upon the silence.
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 11:37 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Palmer, Massachusetts
Posts: 12,716
Default

In some cities/towns you can't take your child out of school for vacation. They are only allowed to miss a certain amount of school days before they will be held back. If that's the case then it a no-brainer. If that's not the case i think it is up to the individual child and his/her teachers. If you child is doing good in school and can make-up the work easily then i think its fine. I also applaud the teachers(personal experience) who make the vacation into a lesson. Sharing pictures and an oral presentation(example -snorkeling with the Sting Rays)
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 01:54 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sblahars
Do you really think this is the best approach?
I do think it's the best approach. People should be prepared for the learning they are going to undertake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sblahars
Don't you think that developing all of your necessary skills (reading, math, etc) should be done together?
Oh, no!! If they're ready for all of it at the same time, I'm all for teaching it at the same time. If they're not, I follow the child's cues. From watching my kids, I can see that their interests and abilities wax and wane all the time. Do you ever hear people describe themselves as "math people" (more commonly as "NOT a math person"!) or "language people" or, my favorite, the perky "I'm a people person!"? We all have strengths and weaknesses and if a kid gets comfortable with his strengths before he has to tackle his weaknesses, he's got more confidence. My son who is the beginning reader may not be able to read very well, but he can tell you anything you might want to know about pandas. And lots of other stuff about other things. The boy is a slow burner, but he burns hot! He listens very well and has a mind like a steel trap. He knows that he's smart, so when he finally did get around to being interested and able to learn to read, he's happy to tackle it.

He went to CCD class and he was amazed. He said to me, "Mom, there are kids in my class who can *read*!!!" He was completely unaware that he "should" be able to read and that there was "something wrong" with him that he couldn't. Some would say that that makes him a moron and me incredibly negligent. My view is that he is now able to learn to read without the baggage of feeling stupid for not being able to do it. Now, if the kids had made fun of him, maybe I'd be singing a different tune. Fortunately, they didn't and he is now gaining confidence in his reading skills everyday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sblahars
You also seem to suggest that the kids who do learn to read their math and science lessons always feel like big dummies for not getting it. I don't quite understand. When I was in elementary school, I was about to read math, science, social studies, whatever else it may have been, and I didn't feel like a "big dummy".
No, that's not what I meant...I meant that the kids who don't read well at age 6, 7 or 8 still have to try to read their other lessons. When they have such a hard time with reading, it spills over into all of the other subjects and *then* they feel like a big dummy. If they struggle with sounding out the words, it's really difficult to absorb the information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sblahars
And I am also curious why you think so much of school is a 'colossal' waste of time. I don't want to start a debate about homeschooling, but don't you think there is a benefit to being around others your own age every day and learning social skills?
I had another friend who was trying to decide whether to homeschool or send her daughter to the very good private school. She sat in on the class her daughter would be in for a day. She used a stopwatch and let the time tick while the teacher and students were actually doing "school stuff"...teaching and learning. She stopped the clock during the administrative times....changing math books out for reading books, telling Johnny to stop tipping his chair, lining up for and going to the bathroom, etc. At the end of the six hour school day, her stopwatch read 1 hour 6 minutes. That's a lot of wasted time!

School, by it's institutional nature, has a lot of wasted time. Hospitals are the same way. I was in the Army...I know about wasted time! Now, when you multiply the 1 hr 6 minutes times 20 students, that's actually 22 hours of learning that went on that day. That's pretty good bang for the buck, but I prefer the one-on-one instruction for my kids.

On the social side, homeschooled kids get to socialize plenty. There are homeschool groups, school clubs, scouts, 4H, church stuff, running errands with Mom. My kids each have 4 siblings with whom to socialize. We have a great neighborhood with playmates for each of my kids...my one yr old is the only baby inthe neighborhood, but everyone thinks she's great (for awhile).

Being with kids only the same age is a rather unnatural situation. The only time you see it in life is in the school system and at military boot camp. In the real world, young people work with older people all the time. There are teachers young and old. Police officers young and old. Bankers, young and old. I could go on and on (seems like I have been!) The real world is inter-generational and mulit-aged.

Homeschooled kids have uncles to teach them to make those armpit-fart noises and silly songs like Beans, beans, the musical fruit.

So there you have it...some radical ideas, but they really make sense. Not for everyone...it would be silly to change all the schools so that reading is introduced at age 8 and expected to be mastered at age 11. For *some* children, reading comes later. If schools could accomodate that, there would probably be a lot fewer kids in trouble.

Sandy
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 03:21 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 59
Default

I'm 47 and still can't read. I guess it's about time I learn. By the way, since I can't read, someone else is typing this for me. Thought you got me, didn't you??
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old March 28th, 2006, 09:18 PM
Fern's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 5,104
Default

Hi Sandyone,

Quote:
Fern, please let me know what you think of this theory. I know that when I first heard of a 12 yr old learning to read I thought his parents must be negligent. And then I tried teaching my 5 yr old to read. Our kids sure do teach us a lot!!!
You certainly know your children better than I, but I feel that they're missing the JOY of reading. I'm not talking about anything to do with schooling, just reading for fun.

What I don't understand is how they can do well in other subjects without being able to read. Do you read all of the texts and questions to them? Maybe they're not reading because you do it for them? How do they take the tests required by your state? Things written online don't always read the way we think they do, so to be clear, this is not meant to be critical, but a "thinking" question.

I don't think reading requires a "program". It's something that most children learn by doing. Maybe I'm "out of the loop", but when I went to school (many years ago ), we read Dick and Jane and I can't remember anyone having trouble reading the simple words.

Keeping on topic, I don't think there's any problem with taking children out of school for a week's vacation. Having a teacher who makes it a learning experience is definitely a good thing!
__________________
Fern

"A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour."

Carnival Inspiration 2002 Carnival Elation 2004
Grand Princess 2004 NCL Sun 2005
Sun Princess 2006 NCL Dream 2007
Caribbean Princess 2007 NCL Dawn 2008
Island Princess 2008 Island Princess 2009
Golden Princess 2009 Carnival Conquest 2010
Grand Princess 2010 Island Princess 2011
Grand Princess 2011 Carnival Magic 2012
Carnival Dream 2012 Island Princess 2013
Carnival Magic 2013 Carnival Legend 2014
Sea Princess 2014
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old March 29th, 2006, 03:11 PM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: My GPS says 12 ft. above 6 ft. under!
Posts: 7,269
Default

I employ a lot of school kids in my restaurant and I don't think I'll ever employ another who is home-schooled. I have employed several in the past and while they are more flexible with work hours than others, which is a good thing for me, they are inevitably a lot less "schooled" on social interactions and group behavior. They are the ones who can't get along with the others. They are always trying to impress others. They just don't fit in with the crowd as well.

That's my real life experience.

Regards,
Thomas
__________________
Book me on your next cruise and enjoy your personal punching bag.
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old March 30th, 2006, 02:43 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 15
Default

Well Thomas, I am pleased that none of my kids will ever feel the need to work in your bar. Go do what you do and exploit those that need the work.
Do you pay them minimum rate or is all tip based and based on individual delivery to the client or are tips pooled?

Either way you win, but I read this as a very old fashioned attitude, times are changing regarding education and home schooling and the individual it produces. But as I say it’s an age thing and because of your age and background, I guess you missed it.

That is not an attack, but another perspective on what you have presented on employment criteria
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old March 30th, 2006, 04:25 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 37
Default

Fern, thanks for the clarification on this as a "thinking" discussion instead of a "criticizing" discussion. That attitude (on both sides) goes a long way to a civil discussion.

Quote:
I feel that they're missing the JOY of reading. I'm not talking about anything to do with schooling, just reading for fun.
Joy is a relative term. There's no joy in reading for a child whose eyes don't see the letters the correct way and who is not developmentally ready to read. One person's joy is another person's torture. One of my kids *loves* enchiladas. Another finds them too slimy and reminiscent of boogers. The first thinks the second is missing out on the joy of enchiladas, but there ain't no joy in eating boogers (unless you're a 2 yr old!!!).

My kids love being read to and the oldest enjoys reading on his own. My next guy is learning and when he gets it, boy, look out!!! He's a sponge for knowledge and I plan on "having problems" getting him to stop reading.

I don't wish for my kids to be late readers...they just are. I wished for early readers who just loved doing it. Reality dealt me a different hand and so we've stepped out of the box of traditional education and go with what we've got.
Quote:
What I don't understand is how they can do well in other subjects without being able to read.
We don't "do school" at home. The kids learn from TV and videos, tapes and CDs and storybooks, biographies (fictional and not), magazines and whatever else crosses their paths. We don't have science class, math class, social studies class, etc. Their learning is a more natural progression than breaking information down into separate bits.
Quote:
How do they take the tests required by your state?
Our state doesn't require any testing.
Quote:
I can't remember anyone having trouble reading the simple words.
I agree that most kids don't need a program, but Dick and Jane is a type of program. The kids in your class who had trouble just didn't read aloud. Were you in the "smart kids" reading group? There is the slower readers' group, too. The kids who were poor students were probably struggling with Dick and Jane, but as a kid, you don't pay attention to those things.

Quote:
Keeping on topic,
....I agree...teachers who encourage the time out of school to be a learning experience are smart. Teachers who insist that every math problem be completed need to re-think what true education is!
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old March 30th, 2006, 07:44 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 59
Default

I'm a strawberry farmer and all I employ are "undocumented citizens".
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old March 31st, 2006, 11:16 AM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: My GPS says 12 ft. above 6 ft. under!
Posts: 7,269
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryRose
Well Thomas, I am pleased that none of my kids will ever feel the need to work in your bar. Go do what you do and exploit those that need the work.
Do you pay them minimum rate or is all tip based and based on individual delivery to the client or are tips pooled?

Either way you win, but I read this as a very old fashioned attitude, times are changing regarding education and home schooling and the individual it produces. But as I say it’s an age thing and because of your age and background, I guess you missed it.

That is not an attack, but another perspective on what you have presented on employment criteria
Sorry, I'm not expressing an old fashioned attitude. I'm expressing my real life experience and that you cannot debate.

I employ kids who come to me looking for a job. Many of them their first job. Other people won't hire them because they have no work experience therefore I am their first leap into the working world. I'm not suggesting home-schooled kids are less educated than their counterparts, some of them are in fact more advanced. I am telling you they don't fit in with the others as comfortably. That's my experience.

Regards,
Thomas
__________________
Book me on your next cruise and enjoy your personal punching bag.
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old March 31st, 2006, 01:48 PM
Junior Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 15
Default

Okay its your own personal experience, fine I accept that. But it is not a reflectition of the children that did not go through public or state school.

Many of them that did not.... are more switched on to reality than those produced by the system. A vast majority of those produced by the system carry the problems that we do not want in society.

So if private/ home education means you are not suitable to serve in a bar/ restaurant. Fine, then its been worth the personal effort from the parents in guiding a different attitude and direction.
Reply With Quote
  #21 (permalink)  
Old March 31st, 2006, 08:46 PM
Fern's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 5,104
Default

Hi Sandyone,

I find this subject very interesting! I do hope you aren't taking offense at my comments. I just want to learn more about home schooling.

Quote:
One of my kids *loves* enchiladas. Another finds them too slimy and reminiscent of boogers. The first thinks the second is missing out on the joy of enchiladas, but there ain't no joy in eating boogers (unless you're a 2 yr old!!!).
This is SO funny! My DH doesn't like anything with a cooked mushroom-like texture. This includes the cooked mushrooms, oysters in ANY form, hard cooked eggs, etc. I love all of these things! Each to his own!

Quote:
and I plan on "having problems" getting him to stop reading.
Please don't worry about him reading too much. My parents, who loved that I loved reading, also worried that I'd miss something because I sometimes preferred sitting in my room reading instead of doing other things. I turned out okay!

Quote:
The kids in your class who had trouble just didn't read aloud. Were you in the "smart kids" reading group?
I'm now really showing my age (I could easily be your grandmother!) ! There was no division of readers when I went to school. Everyone was expected to "be on the same page?, pun intended!

Quote:
On the social side, home schooled kids get to socialize plenty. There are home school groups, school clubs, scouts, 4H, church stuff, running errands with Mom. My kids each have 4 siblings with whom to socialize. We have a great neighborhood with playmates for each of my kids...
This is really one of my main concerns. I've had contact here at home with others who say this, but the groups they are socializing with are all just like them! Do your children socialize with children of other races, religions, income levels, etc? If they do, great! If not, they may not be very prepared for "real life".

That's what Thomas has expressed in his "real life experience".

Quote:
Homeschooled kids have uncles to teach them to make those armpit-fart noises and silly songs like Beans, beans, the musical fruit.
That's great! I learned both of these things in school, but if there are loving family members (okay, "weird Uncles"!) to be "silly" with, it's wonderful!

I found this site:

http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp

and was very surprised at how many states don't require home schooled children to be tested every year. Wouldn't you feel better if you knew your children tested at or above the public school students?

To keep on the cruising topic, when are you and your family cruising again and on what ship? We'll be on Sun Princes in November, a long time away!
__________________
Fern

"A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour."

Carnival Inspiration 2002 Carnival Elation 2004
Grand Princess 2004 NCL Sun 2005
Sun Princess 2006 NCL Dream 2007
Caribbean Princess 2007 NCL Dawn 2008
Island Princess 2008 Island Princess 2009
Golden Princess 2009 Carnival Conquest 2010
Grand Princess 2010 Island Princess 2011
Grand Princess 2011 Carnival Magic 2012
Carnival Dream 2012 Island Princess 2013
Carnival Magic 2013 Carnival Legend 2014
Sea Princess 2014
Reply With Quote
  #22 (permalink)  
Old April 1st, 2006, 01:28 PM
Member
Passenger
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 53
Default

still off topic.....Sandyone-I applaud your efforts to homeschool your children. I have to agree with another poster though that if you are constantly reading their materials to them, what is their motivation to learn themselves? I am not a parent to push the reading thing however when my 5 yr old and I snuggle down to read, he "wants" to do most of the reading. And, correct me if Im wrong, but don't most schools have some type of assistance for those with reading difficulties? In our school district in PA, we are fortunate enough to have a wonderful learning support staff for my 10 yr old son.
__________________
<a href="http://www.TickerFactory.com/">
<img border="0" src="http://tickers.TickerFactory.com/ezt/d/4;10726;128/st/20060426/e/Carnival+Legend/k/d154/event.png"></a>
Reply With Quote
  #23 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 10:48 AM
mehawk's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Houston aka Space City, Texas, USA
Posts: 9,687
Default Artguy

Hey Artguy. You state that you are keeping your grades up in school regardless of your parents removing you from school to enjoy the cruise vacations? Is that why there are eleven, yes, 11, examples of poor grammar and punctuation in your post? . Stay in school young man. Your parents are doing you a disservice, bigtime!!
__________________
Michael

Cruised more times than I can remember.

Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

Courage and perserverance have a magical talisman; before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into the air.

Pick your company wisely! Hang around people who are going to help you become all God created you to be.
Reply With Quote
  #24 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 11:07 AM
mehawk's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Houston aka Space City, Texas, USA
Posts: 9,687
Default

I'll supply my 2 cents worth here... It appears to me, or, IMHO, those parents who choose to homeschool their own children are those who, as children themselves, despised the school environment. As adults, and I use the term loosely here, and parents (?), they are showing their own children how immature and unresponsible they are themselves. Yes, there are a lot of schools that are just plain bad, but, when irresponsible parents, that homeschool their own children, come to a forum and state that their 9 year old will read when the child is ready to learn themselves??? Come on! The child is already exhibiting the same self destructive behavior of the mother. What if she NEVER wants to learn to read Ma'm???

I speak from some experience, as my soon-to-be former DW decided to allow her youngest son to browbeat her into submission and, for a one year period, allowed him to be homeschooled by HIMSELF!!! Imagine that. Gosh. He didn't do anything on the curriculum that that one year. The next year, he had to go back to public school and had to catch up as he was a year behind. I'm talking about a high school student here people.

Ok. Off the soapbox I go...
__________________
Michael

Cruised more times than I can remember.

Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

Courage and perserverance have a magical talisman; before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into the air.

Pick your company wisely! Hang around people who are going to help you become all God created you to be.
Reply With Quote
  #25 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 01:50 PM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 3,315
Default

Mehawk,why single out a child from this thread to scold?A child does what their parents wants them to do(supposely).Why single this person out?Just my two cents....oh,and we ALL make grammar errors on this thing all the time.I have a college degree,and i'm sure I make typing errors ALL the time....give the kid a break.
Reply With Quote
  #26 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 02:28 PM
mehawk's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Houston aka Space City, Texas, USA
Posts: 9,687
Default

Will, being a peace officer, it is my nature to help steer a child to the correct side of life to become a fuctioning member of society. So, if a child, who by the way claims to be "16" and in some states, that's enough to command a driver's license which is strongly on the way to becoming an adult, then he needs to take the criticism. If he didn't come off as a "wiseguy", then I would not have given it a second thought. As I had also stated, I had experienced a stepchild who also thought he "knew it all" and had to face failures becuase of this flippant attitude.

I went over my 2 cent's worth...
__________________
Michael

Cruised more times than I can remember.

Good people sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

Courage and perserverance have a magical talisman; before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into the air.

Pick your company wisely! Hang around people who are going to help you become all God created you to be.
Reply With Quote
  #27 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 08:10 PM
Fern's Avatar
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 5,104
Default

Hi Michael,

I'm sure you know that many people, including 16 year olds, post on the web differently than they write in "real" life!

The two major errors in his post are spelling errors. There is no word "alot". This is one of my pet peeves! It's typed that way a lot, but it's wrong!

The other miss-spelling is probably just from typing too fast.

Hi Sandyone,

Where are you I hope we didn't scare you off
__________________
Fern

"A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour."

Carnival Inspiration 2002 Carnival Elation 2004
Grand Princess 2004 NCL Sun 2005
Sun Princess 2006 NCL Dream 2007
Caribbean Princess 2007 NCL Dawn 2008
Island Princess 2008 Island Princess 2009
Golden Princess 2009 Carnival Conquest 2010
Grand Princess 2010 Island Princess 2011
Grand Princess 2011 Carnival Magic 2012
Carnival Dream 2012 Island Princess 2013
Carnival Magic 2013 Carnival Legend 2014
Sea Princess 2014
Reply With Quote
  #28 (permalink)  
Old April 2nd, 2006, 09:16 PM
Senior Member
Admiral
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: My GPS says 12 ft. above 6 ft. under!
Posts: 7,269
Default

There is more learning to do in school than reading, writing, and arithmetic.

Regards,
Thomas
__________________
Book me on your next cruise and enjoy your personal punching bag.
Reply With Quote
  #29 (permalink)  
Old April 3rd, 2006, 04:00 PM
Sailing gal's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 998
Default

You better not blink Fern or alot will be included in the dictionary. I had a Chinese college student ask me how to spell wanna and gonna. I gave up trying to explain to her that they are not words.

Karen
__________________
Ultimately, the only power to which a man should aspire is that which he exercises over himself.
~Elie Wiesel
Reply With Quote
  #30 (permalink)  
Old April 3rd, 2006, 04:10 PM
Sailing gal's Avatar
Senior Member
Captain
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 998
Default

Sandy,
I find your homeschool talk quite interesting. My sister homeschooled her children and we (family members) talked about her as if her children would be "weirdos" and not able to function in the world. Boy, were we wrong. Her son is at George Washington University and organizes events. He is confident but also humble.
I do not agree that homeschool parents are lazy and did not succeed in school but quite dedicated to their children. It takes much self sacrifice and commitment. Colleges actually prefer homeschooled students.
Good discussion!

Karen
__________________
Ultimately, the only power to which a man should aspire is that which he exercises over himself.
~Elie Wiesel
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do you take your kids out of school to cruise? jackiesbooks Family Cruising 11 February 8th, 2008 12:20 PM
Come on...fess up :) taking kids out of school nurseypoo5 Carnival Cruise Lines 46 March 15th, 2007 11:02 AM
Taking the kids out of school for a cruise Family Man Travel Gripes! 266 March 12th, 2006 11:10 AM
Taking kids out of school bakersuzie Family Cruising 47 July 19th, 2005 07:55 AM
Taking older kids out of school SuzJoh Family Cruising 99 February 5th, 2005 06:56 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:18 AM.
design by: Themes by Design

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1