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  #31 (permalink)  
Old April 29th, 2007, 07:25 AM
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Fieldmouse - and Aiden - Valid points.

Re. The loss of vessels - These are mainly coastal third world cruise ships that often employ poor practices. For the vast majority - and by this I mean US cruisers out of Miami/Ft Lauderdale to the Carribean and back in 7 days - the likes of Carnival & Celebrity - are pretty hot when it comes to passenger safety.

Indeed, it is wise to be prepared for any eventuality - who's to say that half the crew have not been struck down by some event - that leaves the ship understaffed to perform duties? Hence I refer to my above post - be prepared to take alternative action - but follow the advice of those who (any insurance company will tell you) must do their utmost to protect souls and ship.

With regard to waves etc - it all depends on whether the ship/bridge are aware of its existance. Most cruise ships (that we're talking about) can tackle a 100ft wave head on.. Yes, it will cause a pretty nasty roll and so on - but it can survive. However, side-on (ie. they didn't know it was coming) may cause *some* ships to roll over - but most will right themselves.

In anything we do in life - we live in a certain degree of risk. The poor people affected by tge Tsunami of Dec 2005 were going about their daily business - yet they had to deal with what nature threw at them.

Going to sea, you take on an extra risk - voluntarily - and if you can mitigate some of that risk by being a bit more aware of where you are and what you might need to do - the more likely that you and those looking after you are able to survive.

Anyway - I think we've done this thread to death - but - as my final post on this subject - I would implore all who may choose to ignore or dismiss the mater of muster drill to think again about what their attitude may cause to themselves - and - more importantly - those around them.

Safe sailings make good vacations/holidays.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old April 29th, 2007, 03:49 PM
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What amazes me here is the attitude of some that the ship is in control against nature.

Sailing on a "major American cruise line" on a 90,000 ton + ship built in 2002 and in Europe, we turned around the heel of Italy at 3am, and we got hit by a storm in the MED, wind, rain, lightening, thunder....We got the lot. The Captain said later that "it took them by surprise"

150 mile an hour winds hit that ship broadside,,,and it tilted to one side. Resulting in:-

People running around like headless chickens after they had been thrown out of bed, cabinets opening and dumping contents into the room, tv's flying off shelves. The people in lower cabins with a porthole on the listing side described it as " watching a washing machine fill up" when looking out their porthole. They were under water.

Pools emptied down the lift shafts via the "auto opening doors" and into the atrium and further below, it was a nightmare.

The bridge was being covered by the "night crew", and on a ship occupied by multi national people. It took 20-30 minutes to get the Captain out of bed to deal, and the announcer to explain to people in various languages what was happening.

The Captain said the next day that it had been okay when under question at the “meeting� in the theatre, but admitted if we had tilted another 10 degrees more then the ship would not have come back and gone over.

So maybe the "Poseidon" scenario was not so far fetched.

That particular incident is not "internet rumour" I was there. And because there was no loss of life or the ship. Then, maybe that’s why it did not make the "news"

But we lost all electric power and engines due to the flooding from the ships pools and the storm, so all of this for the people onboard was being experienced in total darkness...imagine being in an inside cabin .

The result was we had to stay in the next port for nearly two days to make repairs...and that was in the tide less MED.

But what it did prove to me was…. take them surprise and you see the true ability to deal with a situation.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old April 30th, 2007, 01:57 PM
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DBG: What an experience! Yikes......

How long did it take before you booked another cruise?????
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Old April 30th, 2007, 02:31 PM
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DBG
Glad you got through that safely. Scarey!
Marty
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Old April 30th, 2007, 04:46 PM
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Mehawk.
We are with you on this one!!!!
We, too, understand the reasons for the muster. Sail way was much anticipated. We planned for 16 months for our Alaskan cruise. We were told to go to the theater for muster. Our cabin was mid ship and we never told where our life boats would be. One in our party had never cruised before and he asked for info from one of the crew members. As it turned out, our life boat was far aft. Can't figure that one out. If an emergery did ocurr our boat would be filled with passengers from the aft section..
When that was over we were already underway, and needless to say we didn't get to experience sail away.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 04:52 PM
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"How long did it take before you booked another cruise?????"

About two months, hey crap happens and you deal. I remember it like it was hell, but put me off cruising, no way.

It is the vacation for those from 6 months to 100+
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 01:02 AM
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My son is a USN veteran and was serving our country during Desert Strike (the interdiction operation just before Desert Storm) while on a Med Cruise. He's shared a few stories with us about just how Mother Nature is, and always will be, "the boss" whenever a ship is underway. One such example was while he and other sailors were on the top deck, the ship suddenly listed so far that he was able to reach out and actually touch the deck while still standing up. Luckily, no one was thrown overboard! Things happen, it's out of our control, accept it and hope for the best.
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old May 4th, 2007, 02:01 PM
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Default Re: Lifeboat Drill

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Originally Posted by mehawk
I can understand and appreciate the lifeboat drill but, why do they have to conduct it during the time that the ship is pulling away from the dock? They could watch a couple of minutes afterwards and do it before they get into open waters. I understand why they do it when they do but wish it was timed differently. Your thoughts??
All my experience is with Carnival and without exception every muster drill is before leaving the dock, I never miss the sail away.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old May 6th, 2007, 05:43 AM
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Default Love Munster cheese, hate Munster drills!

Just got back from our Bahamas cruise from Soverign of the Seas (RCI) and the drill was conducted before we left the port.

You can't use the elevators during this time so walking the flights of stairs to get to your designated Munster station was no fun, with the life jacket on and it was hot!

Men in the back, women up front, 15 minutes standing there shoulder to shoulder....it's not the most fun on board but it's gotta be done.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old May 6th, 2007, 05:18 PM
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Question, if not in your cabin, and somewhere else on the ship could you have found from there your cabin to get your life jacket and then onto your Munster station quickly?

When you have just arrived and still "feeling" your way about regarding direction?
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old May 6th, 2007, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidBgood
Question, if not in your cabin, and somewhere else on the ship could you have found from there your cabin to get your life jacket and then onto your Munster station quickly?

When you have just arrived and still "feeling" your way about regarding direction?
When we've sailed RCCI...there were Staff members at the end of the hallways and at the stairs to direct passengers.

When you go into your cabin...the television is always on giving instructions for the upcoming 'muster' drill. There is also, a map on the cabin door with directions.

Now...we thought this was done on ALL cruise lines...WRONG...it is done on HAL and RCCI...but it wasn't done on Celebrity.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old May 7th, 2007, 04:08 PM
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I was telling my dad about this discussion. He use to be in the navy a long time ago. He said in the navy, on the vessel if the siren goes off, where ever you are on the ship at that moment determines your muster station. If you are in the area of starboard, you report to the starboard station, if you are in the area of the aft, you report to the aft....and so on. This way there is no back tracking and bumping into one another ...running into obstacles...ect. Sounds pretty smart to me.

It does take me a few days to figure out the ship, but I can always figure out a littlle quicker how to get to the aft, star board, ect. This would eliminate a whole lot of uneeded stress in a stressful situation!

He was also talking about "Rough" days at sea where the front of the ship would stay under for a few minutes then pop out and shoot up in the air and just bounced around. I asked them how they dealt with those days at sea. He said, "Oh we just learned how to walk on the walls!"
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old May 9th, 2007, 12:57 AM
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Default Re: Lifeboat Drill

Quote:
Originally Posted by mehawk
I can understand and appreciate the lifeboat drill but, why do they have to conduct it during the time that the ship is pulling away from the dock? They could watch a couple of minutes afterwards and do it before they get into open waters. I understand why they do it when they do but wish it was timed differently. Your thoughts??
Why can't I just get signed off and never have to attend another one, I mean it's not like they ever tell you anything different on number 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, etc. etc.!
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2007, 12:03 PM
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The passengers and crew of the Empress of the North, in Alaska ran aground near Icy Straight and the ship had to be abandoned. CNN reports they don’t know WHAT she hit, but she’s taking on water, so the passengers and crew were evacuated on to other cruise ships, etc.

Are we on a roll or what?
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2007, 12:35 PM
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did that just happen? hope the evacuation went smoothly and everyone got off the ship okay.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 01:13 PM
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Nvabill, most of my cruises have been with Carnival also and I have only experienced one cruise where I was actually able to watch us pull away from the dock and leave and party. They did the muster before we pulled away and everyone was able to enjoy sailaway!

That one time... the Celebration in Galveston 2001.
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  #47 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2007, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mehawk
Nvabill, most of my cruises have been with Carnival also and I have only experienced one cruise where I was actually able to watch us pull away from the dock and leave and party. They did the muster before we pulled away and everyone was able to enjoy sailaway!

That one time... the Celebration in Galveston 2001.
You're right in that it happens rather quickly after the muster drill. Sometime you have to run to your cabin to drop off the life jacket and then back up to Lido deck for the sail away! 8)
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  #48 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2007, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbo
did that just happen? hope the evacuation went smoothly and everyone got off the ship okay.
Yup...it was on CNN this morning. According to the report...everything went well, with no injuries, etc. But imagine leaving your ship and your stuff! Not that WE have stuff
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  #49 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2007, 04:32 PM
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You're right in that it happens rather quickly after the muster drill. Sometime you have to run to your cabin and then back up ti Lodo deck!We thank you for the information and when we go on our american cruising we will ask for a lifeboat on the lido deck, thank you for the good advice
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Old May 15th, 2007, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janus
You're right in that it happens rather quickly after the muster drill. Sometime you have to run to your cabin and then back up ti Lodo deck!We thank you for the information and when we go on our american cruising we will ask for a lifeboat on the lido deck, thank you for the good advice
Why thanks Janus!
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  #51 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2007, 05:30 PM
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why do we get angry face as we are polite and thanks you for the help
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Old May 15th, 2007, 06:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janus
why do we get angry face as we are polite and thanks you for the help
Sorry Dave. 8)
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  #53 (permalink)  
Old June 7th, 2007, 06:24 PM
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I was on NCL (SUN) this January (2007) and we did the drill while we were still in port. I remember because we watched one of our friends being escorted up the gang plank by a member of the Port Authority because he was detained when they found a couple bottles of wine and "a corkscrew" in his luggage. It was the corkscrew that almost got him thrown off the ship before he actually boarded. They considered the corkscrew a weapon.
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Old June 16th, 2007, 07:06 AM
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Default Re: Love Munster cheese, hate Munster drills!

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Originally Posted by shogan80
Men in the back, women up front, 15 minutes standing there shoulder to shoulder....it's not the most fun on board but it's gotta be done.
Yes, it's gotta be done ... no question. But it doesn't have to be done in a way that is very uncomfortable and possibly even places some people in ill health at a major risk.

It would take a major disaster at sea for passengers to have to actually go to the lifeboats. What you want the passengers to be comfortable with is mustering to a specific location on the ship if there is an emergency. What better location can you think of than a lounge or dining room that the passengers have been frequenting throughout their cruise. Imagine the panic that would result in an emergency situation where you have passengers trying to remember where their lifeboat station is ... in an emergency ... possibly with limited visibility if the power to the ship's lighting were knocked out? It would be pure pandomonium.

I am in favor of the policy of some cruise lines of mustering passengers indoors for the drill. The passengers are comfortable, can see and hear what is going on, and are more likely to pay attention to the instructions given. Remember, a lot of cruise ship passengers today are older and in less than the best of health. Some have hearing or vision difficulties and thus would be hardpressed to understand the instructions if they were shouted on an open deck where the passenger is uncomfortable to begin with.

In a real emergency, you would probably be asked to muster in a common location anyway. And, if it became necessary to go to the lifeboats, crew members and officers could easily lead them there. There is no reason to conduct the drill itself at the lifeboats at all.

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Old August 26th, 2007, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thasic
Actually, what happened in "The Poseidon" and "The Poseidon Adventure" (the original movie) is impossible. A tidal wave, or more correctly, a tsunami (which is what supposedly hit the ship) only crests in shallow water. When the wave is at sea it appears as an elongated lump of water with a very shallow amplitude (or wave height) only a few feet high and a wavelength of a mile or more.

A cruise ship would likely not even feel the wave pass beneath it while in open water. The wave begins to crest as it approaches the coast, all the energy of the wavelength being trasfered to the amplitude of the wave, thusly creating the wall of water.

Beyond that, most tsunami never reach an amplitude any where near what was depicted in the movies. The tsunami with the greatest height ever recorded was under 30 feet, and most are 10 feet or less, so even if a wave managed to crest in the middle of open waters, it would hardly have enough force to severely rock a huge cruise ship, much less topple it.

I have a background in the US Navy, but the information is easy to find online.
If you had payed attention to the movie, you would hav noticed the captain called it a rouge wave, not a tsunami. Rouge waves do happen and hav sunken ships.
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Old August 30th, 2007, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbo
Here is something odd to add to the lifeboat drill that I don't care for...
on NCL .......some muster stations are on the decks where others musterstations are in the main theater. As I recall on carnival everyone meets on the decks right? What about other cruise lines? I know if the ship is going down, the last place I want to run to is the theater! (much less my cabin for my life jacket).
Holland America makes everyone muster at their actual lifeboat station out on the open decks. I used to think that was best, until I experienced the drill on other lines in a nice comfortable lounge or theater.

The whole purpose of mustering is not necessarily to go to the lifeboats. In fact, very rarely will it ever be necessary to go to the lifeboats. The purpose of muster drill is to muster everyone into a common area so that all can be accounted for and IF it is necessary to go to the lifeboats, people can be led there in an orderly, safe manner.

At least when you have the muster drill in a lounge, everyone is comfortably seated, the people running the drill have the benefit of microphones so that everyone can hear, the temperature is controlled so that everyone is comfortable and can thus pay attention to what is going on. These conditions, at least to me, make for a very informative muster drill. You can't get these conditions out on an open deck.

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Old October 19th, 2007, 01:04 PM
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Muster drills have always been before sailaway on all of my cruises. I have never been on a cruise where any passenger cabins have been below sea level including the old Festivale and Mardi Gras. Was not the Sea Breeze the former Festivale?

Laura
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Old October 19th, 2007, 04:57 PM
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Think of any cruise you have been on, looked out at the open sea and no land in site with people everywhere and usually isolated from their room and "life jacket".

I have read some "opinions" above re "third world", sinkings....was the Titanic "third world????? Accidents happen and usually when no one expects it, a sudden fire, or hit an object....We are now in trouble.

Have you tried being in a Q for anything on a ship? How good was that, how many stood on your toes or tried to walk in front of you?

God help anyone if 3,000 people then find themselves in an emergency, trying to get back down stairs to get their life jacket on, and then back up the stairs to the muster station

More will be lost in that , than the ship actually sinking
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Old October 21st, 2007, 09:52 PM
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[quote="kimbo"]NCL also does the drill after you leave to open waters.

Here is something odd to add to the lifeboat drill that I don't care for...
on NCL .......some muster stations are on the decks where others musterstations are in the main theater. As I recall on carnival everyone meets on the decks right? What about other cruise lines? I know if the ship is going down, the last place I want to run to is the theater! (much less my cabin for my life jacket).[/quo

We have always been in port for the muster, and no, they're not fun. Worst muster ever was on NCL Majesty where we were all herded into the theatre amid screaming and angry crew (women) who had to write down our name and stateroom number before we could sit down. God help you if you sat down first! While one woman screamed instructions from the stage to the center group, two more screamed to the people on either side...all at the same time. Apparently never thought of using the mike on stage and letting the crew on the wings do the flight attendant thing and demo the lifejacket etc. We were then herded on to the decks where we were packed like sardines (small ship) and were held hostage in the blazing sun for a ridiculous amount of time. Perhaps one more reason why we have never been on NCL again.
The muster is important, just as knowing where the fire exit is when you stay at a strange hotel. Our musters have always been on the deck but our kids were on Mariner and muster was quite lax, few lifejackets actually on and everyone sitting in the theatre. In an actual emergency I expect you would grab your jacket and run to the nearest lifeboat.
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