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View Poll Results: Would you like to see "Suggested Dress Codes" gone?
I would prefer that there be NO suggested dining room dress codes 5 2.02%
I would prefer there be 2 Formal nights, and the remaining nights casual 56 22.58%
I would prefer all nights be casual, but no shorts allowed 40 16.13%
I would prefer the dress codes remain as they are, but be enforced 124 50.00%
I would prefer to dress as I please throughout the cruise 23 9.27%
Voters: 248. You may not vote on this poll

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  #31 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2006, 08:25 AM
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If you want a casual option for Alaska, Regent Seven Seas Mariner is Country Club Casual for the entire cruises. Sports coats for men are suggested (no tie needed) for Captains Welcome Party and you will need a sports coat for Signatures; one of the specialty restaurants.

Of course, shorts, flip flops, jeans, are not considered country club casual.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2006, 01:31 PM
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You might want to look at the poll results before your out of line comments and do not trash the Walmart greeter as he might just direct you to the clothes section of the store where you can hopefully buy your nice jeans for your next cruise!
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Old May 14th, 2006, 01:39 PM
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Default To Tux or Not to Tux

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruise Cynic
Half the guys wearing tuxes are Wal-Mart greeters anyways.
And that makes the rest of us who wear a tux, what???????????
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2006, 03:48 PM
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I'm surprised how many are in favor of stictly enforcing the dress code. Guess it sounds kind of like a police state to me too, and I can't imagine having to witness that and listen to some of the tirades that it might induce. When I think of that, I'd perfer to keep things the way they are.

I like having a suggested dress code rather than having it be mandatory.

Phyll
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old May 14th, 2006, 06:57 PM
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Do away with the 'SUGGESTED' Dress Code.
Do not enforce it. If they intend to, they better make it a level playing field for all. That means No! Smokers smoking where ever they want.
No! Kids and babies with diapers in the hot tubs.
No !Under age drinking and gambling.
When you consider all the things on a ship that are of much more importance to our safety than a dress code ??? Please give it up !!!
I want the staff to be concerned with my health and safety !!! Have the staff waisting their time being DRESS POLICE ???? Are you kidding?
I saw more people dressed to your so called nines after dinner who did NOT wash their hands after the bathroom to rush back to their seats for the show. You want the staff to police and enforce rules? How about policing peoples HYGIENE!!! DO not let them leave the bathrooms until hands are washed !!! You can sit at my table in anything as long as your CLEAN !!!
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Old May 14th, 2006, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyllbo
I'm surprised how many are in favor of stictly enforcing the dress code. Guess it sounds kind of like a police state to me too, and I can't imagine having to witness that and listen to some of the tirades that it might induce. When I think of that, I'd perfer to keep things the way they are.

I like having a suggested dress code rather than having it be mandatory.

Phyll
I'm surprised how quickly a social issue became a forum for political commentary! (a Police State??)

When a restaurant in your city has a sign, 'No shoes no service' and refuses to serve you because you do not have on shoes...is that being a 'Police State'? Or are they just excising their rights as a business owner to set the standards of dress in THEIR place of business?

When a restaurant in Beverly Hills California has a sign clearly in view and stating that all men must have on a jacket and tie before seating him...should that be considered a form of discrimation? Or since their requirements are CLEARLY stated, isn't it your choice if you want to eat there or not? Rather than make a fuss, you can either leave or wear a jacket and tie. Easy, easy.

When you go to Disneyland, have PAID for your tickets for all the rides and then some guy at one of the rides says that your child does NOT fit the height requirements...you don't stand there and insist on your rights...you realize that there are rules, etc. for that benefits everyone. Your child is kept safe and Disneyland is protected against lawsuits.

There is NO such thing as absolute freedom, that's a myth...there are always rules, laws, etc. It's what keeps society together and chaos at bay!

Private businesses have a right to set their standards. It's those differences in standards that gives us choices! And we like choices right?

Imagine trying to run a ship with NO fixed guidelines or rules, trying to please everyone, and thus PLEASING NO ONE! It just wouldn't make good economic sense.

Sometimes we get what we want...and then find out, its not want we wanted after all!
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Old May 14th, 2006, 08:16 PM
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I agree with Norm!!! Is there any way that we can permit security to use deadly force if necessary?? Perhaps the "offenders" should promptly be escorted to a liferaft and set adrift? Something must be done!!!
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Old May 15th, 2006, 02:01 AM
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I like to dress up but on a 7 night cruise one formal night would be fine. Two is a bit much. I would be interested in doing an all casual cruise but Im not a windjammer kind of gal. Im a Carnival girl who wants to try the other lines as well. I clean up well and it's nice to get dolled up, but Im an over packer. Having to bring resort casual, casual and dressy clothing fills up the suitcase quick. I have to have purses and shoes to match so Im the queen of overpacking. It would be easier to just leave it casual. However having said that I have no desire to see teenagers with those baggy dingy jeans and their underwear showing in the dining room, or grungy tee shirts and hip hop styles, ball caps and skull caps yuck. So resort casual with nice jeans, but no shorts would be fine. Those who want to dress nicer still could and those who want to be comfortable would be able to, but have to dress with some care.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 09:50 AM
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I certainly did not intend my comment to be political in any way. Using the term police state was a bit extreme I must admit, and probably the wrong terminology. I'd just rather not have to deal with the tension that this might cause on a cruise. I go to relax.

Phyll
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Old May 15th, 2006, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev22:17
This is actually fairly easy.
Have you read this?

http://crewoffice.blogspot.com/2006/...-thats-it.html

Tracy
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Old May 15th, 2006, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave the Wave
No.
I love ya Dave! Straight and to the point!

Listen, I feel like not wanting to dress up for "comfort's sake" really is a cop-out by people. My formal clothes are more comfortable than a lot of my casual clothes. Here's a tip for the ladies.....

Find a wonderful pair of black cocktail pants....mine are the "carwash" style with crepe panels on the front and back of the legs. You can find these with partial elastic waists which make them perfect for cruising. The legs are roomy and flowing. Then find two nice cocktail blouses. Seriously, you will look lovely, fit in, *and* be comfortable! You won't have to lug around a big bulky gown and special corset-style underwear.

I really really don't get what all the fuss is, and why people are so opposed to looking nice and following the guidelines.

Tracy
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2006, 11:43 AM
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I would like to see just two dress code options on the ship. Smart Casual and Formal. Formal is fun at least once on the cruise. It really irritates me though when you read the guidelines for what is acceptable to dinner and you have people showing up in shorts and tank tops. Honestly though, we cannot place the blame on our fellow passengers. The Maitre D actually told members of my family that the next evening is formal night, however, we did not have to wear a suit or a dress, we could wear "nice clothes". So when you have dining room attendants advising you this is acceptable, who is responsible?
It definitely needs to be enforced/policed, whatever word we're using now. lol If someone is not appropriately dressed, the Maitre D needs to advise that unfortunately the dress code policy is in effect and the party can still enjoy the other restaurants on the ship. They do this in clubs/bars/lounges, why not cruise ships?
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2006, 12:31 PM
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Phyll, I agree with you. A cruise should be fun and relaxing.

I kind of feel sorry for someone whose whole cruise is ruined because they witness someone wearing clothing into the dining room that they regard as not being appropriate.

I dress in a suit because it is the "suggested " attire; however, I do not want my photo taken, and a suit and tie is certainly not as comfortable to me as dress slacks and a nice shirt. This may not be true for everyone, but it seems that more and more cruisers are changing to more casual clothing after dinner on formal nights.

Cruise lines are a business and exist to make a profit. They will probably lose more customers by strictly enforcing dining room attire than they will by relaxing the rules.

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Old May 15th, 2006, 05:00 PM
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As someone taking their first cruise in 18 years, I have to say I think that dress codes should be adherred to. That said, I think at the minimum that country club casual should be required. Dressing up is one of the things I always hear about from friends who have gone on cruises. Sure, you may wear a suit to work and want to avoid that on vacation but a crusie is more than jsut transportation form point A to point B. The allure of the cruise is what is enticing to me, which includes dressing for dinner.

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Old May 15th, 2006, 06:15 PM
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Tracy...sounds like you stole my formal attire right out of my closet. Black crepe pants, two dressy tops, black hoochiemomma shoes. Men don't have to wear tuxes, a dark suit for formal nights would be fine. The only girls that I have seen on cruises that go way overboard as far as dressy attire is concerned are the teenagers and they're having a ball getting all dressed up, good for them. Jeans, jeans, jeans, why is everyone obsessed with jeans? Somehow, over the years, they have turned from utilitarian attire (think farming and auto mechanic) to haute couture. The only things they're good for are weeding your lawn and washing your car. There is no way you can "dress up" jeans enough to make them appropriate for the formal nights on cruise ships. Come on people, one or two nights on a cruise is something to look forward to, not dread.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 07:16 PM
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Rosetatoo,Right on and I hope others listen to you.Jeans are for the farm and those who want to remain casual all the time not for cruise ships.What is wrong with a nice pair of khaki pants with a sport shirt with collar?Otherwiswe the lido is open for your enjoyment every nite of the cruise.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 07:51 PM
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Ruby,

We live in Central California and don't have occasion to dress formally. We go downtown for dinner and go to the theater. These are not formal events in our area. We dress appropriately, but not formally. We don't have formal clothing, and don't really relish the thought of having to get some for a one week cruise. My husband has a suit, A SUIT, ONE! He has worn it very few times and lucky for him, he hasn't gained any weight and can still wear it. We usually pack light when we vacation and it looks like cruising is not for light packers.

It sounds like you are making this much more difficult than it needs to be.

>> Back in the 1970's when most gentlemen still owned busienss suts but not "black tie" outfits, the major cruise lines adotped a "modified formal" standard in which gentlemen may wear a dark suit instead of a tuxedo or dinner jacket outfit. If your husband's suit is dark, it will be fine. If not, or if you simply do not want to lug it, all of the major cruise lines now offer rental services. If you send in your husband's measurements or sizes and selection of outfit, they will delvier the outfit to your cabin on embarkation day. You just leave it there at the end of the cruise.

>> If you have a dress that you might have worn as a bridesmaid at a wedding, that dress probably would be very appropriate for formal night. If not, just get a formal cocktail dress that you could also wear to special occasions, such as weddings and funerals, at home.

There's no point in buying something that you won't be able to use.

Another option, if you really don't like dressing up, is to book with a cruise line that does not require dressing up -- and there are several options.

>> Oceana Cruises is "Country Club Casau" every evening.

>> Noreegian Cruise Lines advertises "formal optional" evenings as part of the "Freestyle Cruising" policy.

>> Windjammer Barefoot Cruises is just as casual as the name implies.

>> Most of the smaller coastal cruise lines are casual every evening.

It's simply a question of choosing a line that's appropriate for your preferences.

Norm.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 07:58 PM
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kookylabooka,

With that kind of "police state " mentality you would not have to worry about it because you would be on an empty ship !!!! THe idea behind a cruise is to relax and enjoy !!!!!

You call it a "police state mentality" because I suggest that security should be prepared to act if a passenger gives a hard time to the staff assigned to enforce the policy???

But in reality I doubt that the ship would be so empty. It looks like lots of tolks who post on this board would welcome a cruise line that enforces its dress policy strictly. In reality, it's usually necessary to do the strict enforcement only once before word gets around and passengers do comply with the policy.

Norm.
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  #49 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2006, 08:25 PM
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Fern,

Tell us what you REALLY think, Norm !

What -- did I stutter???

But seriously, it looks like you glossed over a few essential words in reading my post.

Seriously, how are all the staff going to decide what's formal? Is a prom dress formal, but silk pants and a "sparkly" blouse, not? Will they have pictures of formal dress to go by and to show us how to dress?

Most cruise lines publish ample clarification of their standards. There can be some tolerance at the fringes, and equivalent attire from non-American cultures (the Scotsman's kilt, the Bermudan's the formal shorts with satin stripe, etc.). Junior staff should ask their supervisors if they are unsure, as with everything.

What about the people who opt out of formal night and eat at the buffet? Are they not allowed to go to the lounges or the shows unless they dress up?

That depends upon the stated policy of the line. Compare the following stated policies.

>> 1. "The prescribed evening attire applies throughout the ship, except the buffet restaurant and the disco/nightclub, where evening casual attire is acceptable."

>> 2. "The prescribed evening attire is required only at the Catpain's Reception and in the dining room. Evening casual attire is acceptable in the theater, the casino, and all lounges."

I have no problem with a cruise line adopting either policy, but the enforcement should match the stated policy.

If they throw the "offenders" off the ship at the next port, are they also going to throw off the people who drink too much, smoke in non-smoking areas, let their children run wild and get into the adult hot tubs, save seats, etc., etc..

Please reread what I said, only more carefully: "Whenever it becomes necessary for security to escort somebody out of a venue, the chief of security should meet immediately with the offender(s) to resolve the situation. [b} If the offender(s) are obstinate[/b], they leave the ship in the next port -- end of discussion." (boldface added) -- it sounds like you missed the boldface the first time around.

I say enforce the dress code in the dining room and let the rest go.

I'm saying that the enforcement should be consistent with the stated policy. If the stated policy is that the prescribed evening attire applies only in the dining room, enforcement only in the dining room is fine. If the stated policy is that the prescribed evening attire applies in all venues except thsoe designated as casual, enforce it in all venues that are not designated as casual.

I'm also not opposed to common sense in enforcement of the policy -- for example, by extending a grace period to people who are having drinks in a lounge or who are playing at a table in the casino when the evening dress code takes effect (normally 6:00 PM). The reasonable expectation is that people change when they leave the table or when they finish their drinks.

Norm.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 08:45 PM
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Phyll,

I'm surprised how many are in favor of stictly enforcing the dress code. Guess it sounds kind of like a police state to me too, and I can't imagine having to witness that and listen to some of the tirades that it might induce. When I think of that, I'd perfer to keep things the way they are.

Here, the paradigm of "strict enforcement" is that of a velvet glove with a steel fist inside -- gentle and tattful, but firm. More fundamentally, though, the norms of social etiquette demand compliance with the standards of dress prescribed by the host or hostess of a social function -- in this case, the master of the vessel. Since social etiquette requres all passengers to conform to the prescribed evening attire, the need to enforce the prescribed standard of dress should not occur in the first place.

Note, also, that "strict enforement" does not necessarily mean that every cruise line must have formal evenings. If I were in charge of a cruise company, I would have two lines -- one with traditional dress standards, strictly enforced, and the other with a "country club casual" standard every night. If the company were big enough, I would introduce a third line with a standard of "clothes required" (also strictly enforced!).

I like having a suggested dress code rather than having it be mandatory.

You misunderstand. What's "suggested" by a person who olds authority is expected -- not optional.

Norm.
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  #51 (permalink)  
Old May 15th, 2006, 08:49 PM
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CWolsten,

Do away with the 'SUGGESTED' Dress Code.
Do not enforce it. If they intend to, they better make it a level playing field for all. That means No! Smokers smoking where ever they want.
No! Kids and babies with diapers in the hot tubs.
No !Under age drinking and gambling.
When you consider all the things on a ship that are of much more importance to our safety than a dress code ??? Please give it up !!!
I want the staff to be concerned with my health and safety !!! Have the staff waisting their time being DRESS POLICE ???? Are you kidding?
I saw more people dressed to your so called nines after dinner who did NOT wash their hands after the bathroom to rush back to their seats for the show. You want the staff to police and enforce rules? How about policing peoples HYGIENE!!! DO not let them leave the bathrooms until hands are washed !!! You can sit at my table in anything as long as your CLEAN !!!


I don't hear anybody suggesting that a cruise line should not also enforce other rules. I say enforce ALL rules. Nonetheless, other rules are not the subject of this thread.

Norm.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 09:03 PM
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Tracy,

Have you read this?

http://crewoffice.blogspot.com/2006/...-thats-it.html


That's a perfect ecample of the problem with ambiguous policies. I agree with one of the replies, though -- if you have to ask, try again!

Find a wonderful pair of black cocktail pants....mine are the "carwash" style with crepe panels on the front and back of the legs. You can find these with partial elastic waists which make them perfect for cruising. The legs are roomy and flowing. Then find two nice cocktail blouses. Seriously, you will look lovely, fit in, *and* be comfortable! You won't have to lug around a big bulky gown and special corset-style underwear.

Actually, it's even easier than that. Get a velvet leotard with long sleeves and a full length velvet, silk, or satin wrap skirt in a coordinating color. It will fold compactly for packing and be compltely acceptable on formal nights.

Norm.
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Old May 15th, 2006, 10:46 PM
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Folks, we can all say whatever we wish as far as the so-called " dress codes " go but we all know that the cruiselines aren't going to do a darn thing.
Come one, come all. Come dressed, undressed in various stages, or anything and everything inbetween. Just be sure to bring your wallet. That's the only thing that matters in the long run.

On the nude cruises, do ladies wear jewelry on formal nights? Do the guys have to wear a tie ?? Just curious.
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Old May 16th, 2006, 08:38 AM
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when we get dressed up enough to wear a suit or black tie to dinner we usually go out dancing or to a lounge afterwards. We don't go home and change back into casual clothes.
that's not because it's too far (we live 40 miles from downtown), but we wouldn't change even if we lived 4 decks and a few hundred feet away.

I say different lines should have different suggestions. These do not need to be enforced heavily (no gestapo on ships). I think the more upscale don't need encouragement to weat what they wear, the majority don't need to be told, and trailer park will take their park with them wherever they go.

banker
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Old May 16th, 2006, 10:14 AM
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Very well said,banker,and you are right about the upscale lines normally not a problem and they usually do not appeal to the trailer park group.Most of us who have been on numerous cruises know where most of the dress code problems are and maybe these ships should look at a more casual attire and let those who want jeans every nite have at it.
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Old May 16th, 2006, 01:20 PM
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banker,

I say different lines should have different suggestions. These do not need to be enforced heavily (no gestapo on ships). I think the more upscale don't need encouragement to weat what they wear, the majority don't need to be told, and trailer park will take their park with them wherever they go.

The "rub" seems to be what you call the "trailer park" who find their way onto upscale lines, then don't conform.

BTW, I really despise the "trailer park" stereotype for ignroatne buffoons who don't know proper social etiquette. The people I knew who lived in mobile home parks, including my aunt, would not have acted in that way and the people that I know who did lack training in social etiquette never lived in a mobile home ("trailer") park at any time in their lives.

Norm.
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Old May 16th, 2006, 01:30 PM
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Norm, you finally said something that I agree with.

Neither wealth nor status can define a person's true worth. However, I don't think that people who prefer to dress casually are buffoons.

I really don't notice what others wear on formal nights. I do think that I would notice someone in a baseball cap, tee shirt, flip flops and shorts and I don't really believe that any of the major cruise lines would permit it.

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Old May 16th, 2006, 02:01 PM
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After 6 cruises w/Celebrity, I would like to see them drop the semi-formal nights and just go with the 2-3 formal nights and the rest CC casual. for myself it's not a big deal, but my husband hates having to bring a sportcoat and a suit. With the weight restrictions for the airlines, it is going to be harder to pack all that stuff and not pay extra $$.

I can honestly say I have never seen anyone in inappropriate clothing in the dining room but maybe I wasn't looking very hard. But I do think the cruiseline should enforce their rules for the benefit of the many who do follow them.
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Old May 16th, 2006, 07:18 PM
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Paul,

However, I don't think that people who prefer to dress casually are buffoons.

I did not apply the term "buffoons" to people who prefer to dress casually. Rather, I applied the term "biffoons" -- very charitably, I mihgt add -- to people who sign up for a vacation knowing that certain standards of dress will apply and then do not conform to those standards of dress. There is a big difference.

There are some very good options for people who do not want to dress up for formal evenings on a cruise.

>> Some Regent Seven Seas cruises ("luxury" segment) are "all casual."

>> Disney Cruises and Oceana Cruises (both "premuium" segment) offer cruises that are casual every evening.

>> Norwegian Cruise Line ("mainstream" segment) advertises "formal optional" evenings rather than "formal" evenings.

>> Windjammer Barefoot Cruises is just as casual as its name implies. Shorts and "T" shirts are acceptable all the time -- even at dinner.

>> Several of the coastal lines that operate smaller vessels also offer an "all casual" cruise product.

The point is that there are "all casual" options available in varying degrees across all segments of the market, and opting out of formal evenings is just a matter of choosing an appropriate cruise line when booking one's cruise vacation. There's no excuse whatsoever for booking a cruise that includes formal evenings and then showing up at the formal evenings in inapporpiate attire.

Norm.
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  #60 (permalink)  
Old May 16th, 2006, 07:30 PM
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shofer,

After 6 cruises w/Celebrity, I would like to see them drop the semi-formal nights and just go with the 2-3 formal nights and the rest CC casual. for myself it's not a big deal, but my husband hates having to bring a sportcoat and a suit.

Then why not book your next cruise on a line on which the evenings that are not formal are casual? There are enough such lines so finding one that suits the rest of your lifestyle and does not have "informal" evenings should not be difficult.

With today's large cruise companies, the "cruise line" has become the branding that differentites one product from anohter. The "Celebrity Cruises" brand caters to an upscale clientelle, most of whom respond quite posibvely to the "informal" evenings that differentiate this brand from others. We all are best served by more differentiation between products rather than less, as greater differentitaion means more real choices. A scenario in which all lines are virtually identical would mean no real choices at all.

With the weight restrictions for the airlines, it is going to be harder to pack all that stuff and not pay extra $$.

The secret is to take two smaller suitcases rather than one big trunk. The included limit (two checked cases weighing not more than fifty pounds each, plus a carry-on and a personal item, all per passenger) really is quite sufficient even for a three-week trip.

I can honestly say I have never seen anyone in inappropriate clothing in the dining room but maybe I wasn't looking very hard.

I noticed a lot less inappropriate attire on Celebrity than on Princess. I also noticed a major increase in inappropriate attire on Princess after that line dropped its "semiformal" evenings a few years ago.

Norm.
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